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5

Yeah, forests are tough. Altiverb has some good forest verbs. Try an in game worldized reverb with heavy damping, a short tail and a longer predelay. I've found predelay to be the most important setting for real world verbs like this. It should almost sound like a long slapback verb. Try more than 80ms and experiment.


5

If you want high quality, then don't use a digital audio recorder as your microphone. Get a good condenser mic, a sound hole mic or a mic you can mount in the sound chamber of the guitar itself and then if you need more reverb you can use a traditional effects unit or effects petal depending on if you are using a powered mic or not.


5

In theory, yes. A filter is known as linear if it is both additive and homogeneous. For an additive filter, the filtered sum of signals is the same as the sum of filtered signals. (Homogeneity means that gain or attenuation can come before or after the filter.) Most digital reverbs, including all convolution reverbs, are linear filters. In practice, also ...


3

Resonance and reverberation are, indeed, more or less just two aspects of the same phenomenon. The difference is whether you focus on what happens to the time-domain representation (reverb) or frequency-domain representation (resonance) of a signal. For instance, when you seed a room with a short impulse and observe how a microphone picks up a far longer ...


3

Yes, there are ways to try to reduce echo, but they also negatively impact the sound with artifacts. You can use features like gates to try to cut off when someone stops talking directly, but those are probably best applied after recording. There is nothing that you can apply, in software, at the time of recording that you can't apply later. You don't ...


3

Headphones. You will sacrifice dynamics but considering the sound of the room, it may be worth it. How many mattresses? Anything less than 5cm thick will only tackle high frequencies.. Record a slow sine sweep or pink noise then look at your room modes. You might get away with corrective EQ? Nothing will help the flutter other than wall treatment or throwing ...


2

Checkout this page. If you want go deeper try this one from J. Smith


2

One thing that always helps to get something in a special Place -> Reverb/Impulse Response Reverbs. One thing so -> Don't always think you need a big reverb for wide locations. Sometimes small reverb create a better image of a big wide place, imho. If you want go get your hands dirty -> Go into a wide,rock canyon (or similar, maybe a stadium etc.) and ...


2

Try clean 909(first)/808(second) Kicks and tune them to around 45 Hz. Then use gates reverb if you want but really be careful with the amount ant eq setting on the reverb channel. Also fine-tune the pre delay a good amount of time. Then something that i think he used is parallel compression with some distortion. This can help you make the reverb tail rumble....


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It's rather obvious, but anyway sayin': whatever device produces the reverb, it will do so as an electronic signal, not as sound right away! So you foremostly need a PA to make this audible in a large hall. With such a somewhat large-scale PA, there comes a console that nowadays almost always has a DSP unit built in (or a proper 19" reverb unit). Using a PA, ...


2

If you want to add reverb to your signal, then you need a reverb unit. There are two ways to approach this. You can use a standalone reverb unit, or you could use a plugin running on a computer (as well as an audio interface to get audio in and out of the computer). The computer gives you more flexibility, but it also gives you more latency (that is, ...


2

I'd be far more inclined to try fix it at source first. There are several plugins I've tried that attempt to de-verb, but none anywhere near as successfully as just not recording it in the first place. Simplest trick would be to hang a heavy blanket, duvet or similar on the wall behind you [or hang it over a spare boom stand etc, close up behind you], ...


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I will have multiple reverbs with the same setting routed accordingly if I need a room for more than 1 group. Otherwise it stops you from printing your mix and all the associated splits and deliverables in one pass.


2

The definition you gave seems to have the definitions for resonance and reverb built into one, which makes it more confusing. From a physics perspective, everything has various resonant or natural frequencies. Here's a little tidbit if you're interested. These characteristics are known better to musicians as harmonics. As I learned in physics: Resonance ...


2

See previous discussion here, SPL De-Verb is probably what you're looking for. You can watch a comparison between SPL, iZotope, Zynaptic in this YouTube video.


2

Convolution reverb would be your best bet here. Find an impulse response that is recorded inside a stadium and run the plugin via auxilary send so you don't wash out the initial sound source. Make sure to also EQ the reverb if needed, Space Designer comes with a built-in EQ but you can also use a typical channel EQ as well.


2

Have you tried worldizing your samples? It won't cost you anything but your time and you'll undoubtably learn a lot in the process. Also, try reaching for complex delays in lieu of reverbs. Soundtoys EchoBoy is a great choice if you have it, otherwise nearly any delay plug will help get you started.


1

In general the order matters a great deal. You'd generally want your chain to go something like Filters/EQ -> Compression -> Time effects (Reverb/Delay). EQ first because you usually wouldn't want to be compressing frequencies that aren't going to be there after passing through the EQ. Specifically with Reverb / Delay that would probably come down to ...


1

Most likely a different algorithm. Do you think the manufacturers would be able to sell more expensive hardware units if the same algorithms of their boxes in the thousands dollars would be available as $99 plug-ins? I don't think mere numerics "problems" are able to make substantial changes. It's true that they are related to accuracy, but the ...


1

So as I understand you want to add effects on the "live monitoring" while not adding effects on the recording. This can be done. You just need to run the "live monitor out" of your yeti microphone through a reverb effect, and then to your headphones. So how can you do that easily? The simplest way is to just buy a hardware reverb, and run the live ...


1

@mohammad_rafigh I actually didn't know that was why it was called "thick" that's interesting. I will add @stormy that there is a lot more going on than reverb in those two tracks so I am curious what other effects you are trying out on your drum sounds. Everything has to mesh and work in harmony in a certain way. But on the reverb front, I will only add ...


1

after hearing tracks you mentioned in comments I can say that yes you can do it using a thick plate reverb as well as a spring reverb. but it needs some modifications. a plate reverb system uses an electromechanical transducer, similar to the driver in a loudspeaker, to create vibration in a large plate of sheet metal. a pickup captures the vibrations as ...


1

That is most likely a real Space Echo (RE-201 / RE-301) and not some plugin chain. We have one in the studio and use it for exactly such things. Those tape delay devices are very tough to imitate using software. The exact same question has been discussed at Gearslutz - one reply states that Kevin is using the RE-20 Space Echo (the pedal version) along with ...


1

You need to use EQ/Equalization on the dry voice and boost resonant frequency with a narrow notch filter. It might match closer if you then apply a basic reverb afterward, but it will take some trial and error. The important thing about modal frequencies is that practically they are just a higher amplitude of that frequency. If you can identify one or two ...


1

Check out this video: Although the person in the video doesn't set the same parameters that you would like to control with a macro, the process is still the same. Click on the upper-right corner of the macro knob you would like to have control OSC pitch and then click on the box that is linked with said parameter. After this,...


1

I generally call the tool I use for this "a sound guy". You can automate it though by doing some dynamics processing on the input to the effects unit. You need to use a device called an expander on the feed going to the effects unit (or have an effects unit that provides it's own expander). An expander is a lot like a compressor, but the ratio goes in the ...


1

The various effects are quite simple: There is pitch shifting, some delay, a fair amount of reverb, and a bit of fade and panning, and the vox are cut in and out - but the most important thing is the filtering. A lot of the vocals are run through a low pass filter, chopping out a lot of the treble. As cworner commented, we'd need to hear your attempts and ...


1

I dont know why no one has mentioned it but if you go for vintage style reverbs there are 4 ways to achieve: Spring reverb Plate reverb Actual big space on recording Reverb chamber 3 & 4 are hard to have nowadays. Spring reverbs can get pretty pricey like AKG 20 but there are many other cheaper, also spring reverbs have a signature "boing" sound ...


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