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7

That effect is called Backwards Reverb - the simplest way to do it is to reverse the waveform, then add a normal reverb, then reverse it again. Many DAW's have a backwards reverb plugin which effectively does exactly this, but without you having to do the reversing manually, but I don't think Fruity Loops has this. I did find this tutorial specific to ...


6

I almost always end up EQing my reverbs, although sometimes convolution reverb presets work without alteration. It truly depends on what you are sending to the reverb and what else is happening in the mix. Un-EQed reverb usually covers the full frequency spectrum, and if you're talking about many elements in a mix then adding broadband reverb can result in a ...


6

To add to the other ideas here, it's often the layered complexity of outdoor reflections that gives them a natural feel. Real spaces, indoor or outdoor, never sound exactly like a reverb preset. I find it fun to design a bunch of options and mix-and-match—my usual strategy is to take 3-4 sends from the dialog/FX tracks and create corresponding aux tracks, ...


6

Usually a convo verb can give decent results, as Dave mentioned. I find that even with that, it all comes down to the predelay and late delay parameters which 'sell it' though primarily, in my opinion. Predalys and late delays, and how they're used, are what give the reverb that character "slap" off the walls (or, the trees) that we recognize in real life. ...


5

Yeah, forests are tough. Altiverb has some good forest verbs. Try an in game worldized reverb with heavy damping, a short tail and a longer predelay. I've found predelay to be the most important setting for real world verbs like this. It should almost sound like a long slapback verb. Try more than 80ms and experiment.


5

I have impulsed a number of ways. Balloon pops, belt snaps and tone sweeps through speakers. I like the speaker sweeps the best. Sound Forge comes with acoustic mirror and you can find the tone sweeps on their site. Acoustic mirror can deconvolve after you record the sweep. Voxengo deconvoler is another great one that you can even batch process. It can also ...


5

If you want high quality, then don't use a digital audio recorder as your microphone. Get a good condenser mic, a sound hole mic or a mic you can mount in the sound chamber of the guitar itself and then if you need more reverb you can use a traditional effects unit or effects petal depending on if you are using a powered mic or not.


5

In theory, yes. A filter is known as linear if it is both additive and homogeneous. For an additive filter, the filtered sum of signals is the same as the sum of filtered signals. (Homogeneity means that gain or attenuation can come before or after the filter.) Most digital reverbs, including all convolution reverbs, are linear filters. In practice, also ...


4

I've toyed around with the demo quite a bit, and it's on my "to purchase" list. There are just a couple of higher priority items ahead of it at the moment. It's an impressive piece of software. Like RX2, I always describe it as a "reduction" tool, not a "removal tool. While it's got a bit of learning curve before you start getting the best results, those ...


4

Have you tried any convolution reverbs? Most of those would have an outdoor sample. I know the stock one in logic has a few. Convolution is really IMO the best approach for recreation of a real space like this. Good luck dude.


4

Hey Geronimo, why don't you experiment with re-amping the dialogue track through a slightly open door. Even if the result isn't usable, you'll at least have a very solid reference that you can aim for with regards to verb and eq. speaker in room A -> half open door -> mono mic in room B from camera perspective alternatively you could shoot an impulse ...


3

ValhallaRoom for warmth Revibe/Reverb one for hifi/bright LX480 for natural/transparent space - might replace with the newly cheap LXP bundle from Lexicon or Michael Carnes new Exponential Audio "Phoenix" depending who goes AAX first DVerb for small room/ambience TL space and Valhalla Shimmer for more out there stuff - not including delays like Echoboy ...


3

Headphones. You will sacrifice dynamics but considering the sound of the room, it may be worth it. How many mattresses? Anything less than 5cm thick will only tackle high frequencies.. Record a slow sine sweep or pink noise then look at your room modes. You might get away with corrective EQ? Nothing will help the flutter other than wall treatment or throwing ...


3

For the guitars retro reverb would be vacuum tube driven springs as found in a 1963 to 1965 Black Face amp such as the Super Reverb, Deluxe Reverb, etc,. Also Fender and others had a standalone tube driven spring reverb that was far superior than the amps mentioned. Many effect boxes emulate this sound, Zoom does it pretty well. I have a replica Uncle Spot ...


3

Yes, there are ways to try to reduce echo, but they also negatively impact the sound with artifacts. You can use features like gates to try to cut off when someone stops talking directly, but those are probably best applied after recording. There is nothing that you can apply, in software, at the time of recording that you can't apply later. You don't ...


3

Resonance and reverberation are, indeed, more or less just two aspects of the same phenomenon. The difference is whether you focus on what happens to the time-domain representation (reverb) or frequency-domain representation (resonance) of a signal. For instance, when you seed a room with a short impulse and observe how a microphone picks up a far longer ...


2

Checkout this page. If you want go deeper try this one from J. Smith


2

You need to experiment with Altiverb (from Audio Ease). The exterior IRs were created for this very purpose and often you will get stellar results just from the presets.


2

There's a preset on the TC Electronic System 6000 Reverb, which you often see on big dub stages, called "Big City." It is a pretty long reverb mixed with multi-delays. It's also on the VSS3 plug-in. That would be a good one to analyze.


2

It's not just about laying on a load of reverb, you ideally need to EQ and level the various sounds in your soundscape too. The further away something is, the more of the top end you need to remove, 'muffling' the sounds. In addition to playing around with tweaking 'concrete' or 'city' -style reverb presets, try experimenting with a few sounds in your '...


2

I've used the "Outdoorverb" by xoxos on a few projects and have had good results. It's a freeware VST plugin for PC, so unfortunately PT (and MAC) cannot run it. It's a tap delay-type unit which incorporates a pitch variance. It's an interesting little plugin. Recommended if you can run it. http://rekkerd.org/xoxos-releases-outdoorverb/ Good luck with the ...


2

I did a test drive with this plugin, and I honestly didn't like it at all. Call me old fashioned, or say that I may enjoy a pleasant bit of organic noisefloor in my dialogue tracks, but I wasn't turned onto this tool. I was turned onto the concept, but in implementation I didn't like it. The interface although cool looking, I didn't find very intuitive. ...


2

One thing that always helps to get something in a special Place -> Reverb/Impulse Response Reverbs. One thing so -> Don't always think you need a big reverb for wide locations. Sometimes small reverb create a better image of a big wide place, imho. If you want go get your hands dirty -> Go into a wide,rock canyon (or similar, maybe a stadium etc.) and ...


2

Try clean 909(first)/808(second) Kicks and tune them to around 45 Hz. Then use gates reverb if you want but really be careful with the amount ant eq setting on the reverb channel. Also fine-tune the pre delay a good amount of time. Then something that i think he used is parallel compression with some distortion. This can help you make the reverb tail rumble....


2

If you want to add reverb to your signal, then you need a reverb unit. There are two ways to approach this. You can use a standalone reverb unit, or you could use a plugin running on a computer (as well as an audio interface to get audio in and out of the computer). The computer gives you more flexibility, but it also gives you more latency (that is, ...


2

It's rather obvious, but anyway sayin': whatever device produces the reverb, it will do so as an electronic signal, not as sound right away! So you foremostly need a PA to make this audible in a large hall. With such a somewhat large-scale PA, there comes a console that nowadays almost always has a DSP unit built in (or a proper 19" reverb unit). Using a PA, ...


2

I will have multiple reverbs with the same setting routed accordingly if I need a room for more than 1 group. Otherwise it stops you from printing your mix and all the associated splits and deliverables in one pass.


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