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4

I'd have to second Ian's sentiments here. It's not as simple as "Go work overtime.". The games industry sounds similar to TV and often it's not possible to record new sounds. Before I worked in the industry I was all "I'll never use libraries!" and now I'm actually working to deadlines and see what production is actually like, I'm thankful we have libraries ...


4

I share Shaun's sentiment, mainly as I too work in TV. I disagree with Conant who's response seems a little naive to practicalities of life. I would love to record all the sounds I need but there simply isn't time (and budget) to do such things in the world of quick turn around TV work. Besides, another argument is why would I spend time and money ...


4

It's really a question of schedule and the time available. In an ideal world, I prefer to record things from scratch. There just isn't always time for that (not in TV audio at least). However, there are occassions where it's more efficient to record from scratch than to spend time building a complex sound from library components. I try to spend down time at ...


3

Time and budget hardly ever allow for recording everything you need. We try to record the more unusual or signature stuff as much as we can for each proect. Watching the cut of a show and then going out to record always leads to me recording in a different way, trying to get the specific stuff I need, rather than a complete recording set; unless time allows....


3

If you want classic, but slightly recognizable cartoon effects: http://www.sound-ideas.com/hb.html


3

Doing a series of commercial ads for survivor , they by this im referring to the agency ( agency team of blue haired , bad dressed , cell phone glued freaks ) wanted the following within their ads Ad 1 : Sound of piranhas eating meat of a man's left leg. Ad 2 : Sounds of a a python slowly crushing a human arm Ad 3 : A squawk of a parrot that has just been ...


3

A classic Sound Ideas 4000 series should help you. http://www.sound-ideas.com/4000.html


3

The following is just an opinion from just another freelancer. In my experiences, I have never found a sound from a library that completely matches picture or fulfills the need with just that one layer pulled right off the hard drive. Usually its layering many different sonic characteristics together to create a full sound that matches the style and ...


3

To echo a bit of what @Shaun said, it's definitely preferable to record your own material and build your library. Time and budget don't always allow, but when they do it's a perfect occasion to build your personal stash of sounds and set yourself apart from all the rest.


3

Really nice work! I recorded some printing presses last year, and found the big industrial ones to be incredibly challenging to get just right. I was really running and gunning in a massive industrial complex though. Sounds like you had the opportunity to sit and do a study on one machine, which is very cool IMO. What was your recording setup?


3

Well, you can get the Boom Library's Designed Guns for $128, which is very reasonable. If you're looking to spend less than that, I'm afraid you may be sacrificing quality for expense. Try freesound.org, try recording your own gunshots, or try purchasing single gunshot sound effects from any of the various online libraries that offer single sound effect ...


3

Your best bet still is to get a decent commercial sampler with an included sound library. Look for things like Kontakt or Mach Five. Unlocked Kontakt libraries (full version not Kontakt Player) will give you access to the original samples. This will save you a lot of trouble and the quality you get should be adequate. If for some reason (licensing is the ...


3

I'd prefer to have it just chopped into sections 4-5 minutes long and have them labeled a,b,c,d,e etc. It makes it easy to import a short section when you only need 30 seconds of ambience but then you can piece them together if you need long sections.


2

I make about 90% of my living from stock libraries and instruments, though the vast majority of that is from direct sales. I still do have some good relationships with 3rd party distributors that are worthwhile. People do definitely by sfx, different types for different markets. I think most people on here sell dry material geared toward sound designers to ...


2

Hi Bala, it sounds like you still have more market research to do before you're ready to launch. I'd go check out the kontakt forums for a good source of guys that are already out there doing it. Once you see what they do and what they charge you'll have a better idea of where your stuff fits in the marketplace. Aditionally, go look at soundiron.com and ...


2

This, too: Warner Brothers. http://www.sound-ideas.com/wb.html


2

Hi, this is another sfx library that is good: http://www.sound-ideas.com/rocky.html


2

Sound Dogs might be your best bet: http://sounddogs.com/ If you want a lot of door sounds, you could check out Sound Ideas door library: http://sound-ideas.com/9000.html


2

The Macaulay Library at Cornell licenses their recordings.


2

Visit the companies listed here: http://designingsound.org/sfx-independence/ Pick and choose libraries from the various companies, there is a lot of reasonable priced stuff out there.


2

Found this and it's exactly what I was looking for! http://boomlibrary.com/boomlibrary/products/sci-fi Hopefully this helps someone! :)


2

Have you checked out Frank's set? I like to record where I can, but his is a pretty comprehensive starting point if you need a jump-start on variety. As far as recording goes, more brittle types of leaves work best I find - palm trees (and other such stalky things like corn fields), and a set of brittle winter maple tree leaves I recorded at my family's ...


2

Well, it's up to you of course. But from the point of view of the consumer, I think it's reasonable to expect some kind of discount for buying 10+ units. Perhaps you need to have a special rate for 5+, 10+, 25+ and quote a discount for them. It's generally good to keep the customer happy. If you think you got a good deal somewhere you are much more likely ...


2

We did a whole tonebenders episode on this topic with Paul Virostek. I personally edit what I need, backup the originals and then never think of them again. Dustin keeps all of it and I have no idea how he goes back through the source recordings. I find soundminer to be a huge asset for this kind of thing, because it lets me tag the files as I see fit and ...


2

Freesound.org is a user-submitted collection of free sounds, of varying quality and intent but the search function might allow you to find what you need. There are four different licenses used on that page, so make sure to know the terms and restrictions (some prohibit commercial use, some require attribution). You can filter by license using the right ...


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