6

That is the result of bad isolation of either the DAC or the ADC. If the internal circuitry of the interface and the actual capture or playback circuitry share a common power supply, the operation of the electronics itself cause a distortion to the power being supplied to the capture or playback circuits. Capture and output both rely on a fixed reference ...


5

Your friend is probably talking about one of the Sennheiser MKH mics. Possibly the 416 or the MKH40. These are great mics, but are perhaps overkill for what you are proposing to use them for. Often people use these because they are recording at extremes and need the low noise (such as recording quiet atmos at night) or the resilience these mics have. For ...


5

Most people have difficulty hearing 18 kHz, except at very loud levels. Quite possibly, even with perfectly flat transmission, you'd have trouble hearing that frequency while the voice level remains bearable. Now, partly because the very high-end is hard to hear, hifi speakers tend to boost them quite a bit so as to sound particularly "crisp" – not ...


4

Ears are not a very good tool for sound measurement. I would spend a couple of bucks on a sound analyzer app for your phone - I have SignalSpy on the iPhone - and set it to spectrum analysis. Hold the microphone near your headphones and "listen" to the sound. You should see a nice spike in the spectrum: something like this Sound was generated with ...


3

frequencies above what microphone allows Microphones have a frequency response curve. This is a random example: The exact shape of the diagram is different for each microphone, but they all have one thing in common: the response will be as close to flat as possible in the range we're usually interested in (20 Hz- 20 kHz for full-range audio microphones), ...


2

Purely a personal opinion, but you'd have to go a very long way to beat a DPA 4006 [used to be called Brüel & Kjær, or B&K] http://www.dpamicrophones.com/en/products.aspx?c=item&category=191&item=24010 about £1200 or so for a new one, not cheap, but truly transparent sound.


2

Thinking about my personal process, I normally alter my process based around what I'm mixing. For your typical rock mix, the drums form the foundation around which everything else is built, so I generally at least get them close, but then vocals and guitar are what people focus a lot of listening on, so I normally move to them pretty quickly once I have a ...


2

I just like to add that it seems a bit overdone to buy a specific mic for +20Khz recordings, if you do not have a very good reason (besides a little experimentation). You could also invest in a very good portable recorder (perhaps the new sony pcm-d100 or a nagra). This will give you the best of both worlds (high freq, and great converters). I've recorded at ...


1

I do not think it is possible to record the noise you hear and if you want to know why I will explain in detail below The Yeti has different sensitivity with different settings. Make sure it is in position 2 which should be Omni directional which is the most sensitive according to the manual. Ideally humans can detect sounds at a level as low as 20 micro ...


1

I suspect that most sounds dogs hear are still focused below 20 kHz, with only some extra overtones that reach higher. With humans it's also this way: we only can properly distinguish sounds up to about 8 kHz. Higher frequencies are still well sensible, but they don't carry much useful information for us, mostly just a feeling of openness / clearness / ...


1

I would check out the level difference range speced for that frequency range. My guess is that those headphones reproduce 15Hz and 18kHz alot lower than 1kHz.


1

If you want cheap and you can solder, it seems that cheap electret capsules could also be used - at least according to this article: http://www.wildlife-sound.org/equipment/technote/micdesigns/ultrasonic.html This is contrary to what is stated in the WM 61 datasheet, but hey...if it works. Earthworks and DPA also uses electret capsules in many of their ...


1

I've had this problem today with a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 USB interface and some new Yamaha HS7 monitor speakers. The problem is likely to be dirty power. However, is simply fixed with the addition of a cheap Ferrite Ring - a magnet basically that is wrapped around your USB power cable to the sound card. If you're in the UK you can find them at Maplin - ...


1

Well, since I just ruined a recording yesterday, here is another pointer: don't let your microphone cables run across the laptop's switching power supply on the ground. Balanced cables may be good for a lot of electromagnetic abuse, but there are limits. So keep a distance between the analog and the digital parts of your setup and particularly avoid direct ...


1

I have the exact same interface and was hearing the exact same noise, except it was not there when I bought the interface. It does seem to be a power-supply-related problem, turns out the noise only appeared when I was plugging it into a USB hub, not the computer directly. So, while this may or may not be the cause of the author's problem, other people in ...


1

I hade the same problem and here is the solution : go to system preference sound input find Yeti Stereo Microphone reduce the input volume Mine was at 100%, that's why I heard the exact same sound. I Hope It helped.


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