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18

I don't know where you read about USB interfaces needing to "compress the sound", but it's nonsense. For your application two channels will do; at 96 kHz and 24 Bit that's less than 5 MBit/s: even USB-1.0 can handle that without compression. and USB-2.0 is already more than ten times faster, so even in multichannel applications it's often plenty good enough. ...


16

The Fast Track Pro is an audio interface. It takes an analog signal and converts it to digital, and provides a way to connect to the computer. The USB microphone simply has a built-in interface. It comes down to what you want. If you specifically don't want to always use the Fast Track Pro, then the USB mic might be a good option, although like you said, ...


7

I bet this won't be the best answer but let's give it a shot shall we? Different DAWs do different things. I wouldn't recommend Ableton Live or Propellerhead Reason for someone who wants to record a live band - both DAWs are oriented to a more software generated sound and sample handling situation. The same way I wouldn't recommend Pro Tools for someone ...


6

I don't think it's coming from your microphone because there is a small stereo width to the noise at all frequencies. The microphone can only produce perfectly mono sounds. Here's an enhanced spectrum of the noise: - Very noticeable are the sequence of peaks at precisely 1kHz, 2kHz, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (not 8), 9, 10, 11, 12kHz etc.... These are very unlikely to ...


6

Please, please, please get a mic with an XLR over a USB connection unless you are just cranking out podcasts. If you are recording songs, you will eventually want to introduce a nice preamp and maybe some analog eq and compression into your signal path. This will be impossible of the A/D is built into the mic.


6

It was bound to happen before long: - Not easy to achieve technically and I can't vouch for its quality but I know two guys who have facebook "liked" this product and one of them does live gigs. The trick is to efficiently take a slice of the 5V offered from the USB and efficiently convert it to a higher voltage that is more practical for audio mixing such ...


5

A good digital signal should either get there or not. Minor differences in cable quality are not going to have any impact at all other than latency. Latency is simply the delay in how long it takes to get to point a to point b and won't impact the sound quality significantly. USB is a digital signal, so a "premium" USB cable is a load of crap. There is ...


4

I had a quick look at your device, it says the USB input is 16 bit / 48 kHz and that the device uses asynchronous sample rate conversion and 24 bit DACs @ 192 kHz. S/PDIF and Toslink are identical at the bitstream level and both are consumer variants of AES3 which supports 16 or 20 bit at 44.1 or 48 kHz. the HiFace2 says it has very good clocks, which ...


4

Focusrite Scarlett and an SM57 should be just fine. Combine it with a DAW like Ableton, Pro Tools, Cubase, Reason, Logic, etc, and you'll have a good setup. leftaroundabout mentioned many of the main reasons so I won't repeat them all, but the main reason is that USB2 is often not the bottleneck for recording applications unless you're doing extremely ...


4

The ProFX8 will let you record only a stereo channel (or 2 mono) at a time. I am not familiar with Traction, but in Cubase you can go to menu Devices > Device Setup and choose the Mackie from the first option field (Asio driver). Then you might need to go to Devices > VST Conections to route the channels to the right input. Here you can choose in ...


4

It depends on your device. Some Android phones support a headset input through the headphone jack (such as through this device [Traveler Guitar MI-10]). In that case, a simple adapter can allow you to feed an audio line in. Other devices allow what is called host support for USB. If this is the case, then you may be able to use a USB audio interface if ...


4

This keyboard should work just fine. The keyboard hooks up to the computer via USB. The computer then needs the proper USB MIDI driver to communicate with the keyboard. A quick Google for "m-audio 88es linux" got me this result among others which seems to say that at least someone got it working.


4

A few quick notes At stage volumes, you really really want to be using a SSD Drive. You will have issues with normal platter style HDD's at stage volumes due to vibration Even with a SSD, you're going to want to sit the laptop on some vibration damping type material. Grab some mopads (designed for acoustically decoupling speakers) and sit it on that, ...


4

That is the result of bad isolation of either the DAC or the ADC. If the internal circuitry of the interface and the actual capture or playback circuitry share a common power supply, the operation of the electronics itself cause a distortion to the power being supplied to the capture or playback circuits. Capture and output both rely on a fixed reference ...


4

If you won't be using it on stage or with other MIDI gear apart from a computer, a USB only on your keyboard controller should be okay. (Personally I find the connection more stable) Modern PC's should allow you to route the MIDI signals to other USB-MIDI devices plugged into the PC within the OS or software. In my experience with Macs, you can do the ...


4

Here is 4 channels for $250 with mic pre amps and dedicated outputs should you need them. There are a handful of 2 channel units for under 200 here is a 4 channel right at the $200 mark. You are brushing right up on the lowest quality level at that price. You may sacrifice quite a bit of quality which may impair what ever research you are doing. Side note: ...


3

I find such arguments generally invalid. The whole point of digital is that the signal is transmitted as-is, without loss or coloration. Now, one might make an argument from the standpoint of interference (e.g., if you're running your USB cable alongside a thinly insulated power cable with a 10kw load), but such arguments are silly as well. If someone out ...


3

Well, it turns out that our worthless electricition did not properly ground the outlets in this room - I used a tester to verify this. This would explain the humming noise in my recordings and also some other unmentioned audio problems I've had in the past. I'm going to fix the grounding for the outlet and assume this problem will be solved. I was able to ...


3

If you look at the information on the web page you linked to, this is by design: Channels one and two have independent gain trims, while channels three and four are configured as a stereo pair at the level and pan controls. and The MultiMix 4 USB mixer has four input channels, all of which can accept a 1/4" line input. You can can plug XLR ...


3

The usual reason for these being external are: No conflict with internal devices Size and heat requirements Requirements for multiple interfaces: midi, spdif, line-in, mic etc User interface requirements - mixer controls, EQ etc Occasionally power requirements - an externally powered sound card can provide a lower noise floor, higher quality and dedicated ...


2

The easiest way is to use a 1/4"mono to 3.5mm stereo adaptor (guitar cable to headphone cable). This isn't hard to make (with some rudimentary soldering experience) from a cheap guitar cable and a pair of broken headphones (usually less than $20). Also, many cheap adaptors exist to downsize the 1/4" guitar plug to a 3.5mm headphone plug.


2

Maybe a Sound devices USBPre 2 ? http://www.sounddevices.com/products/usbpre2/


2

Echo make reliable interfaces and I'm gutted they've killed off much of their lineup. I'm hoping there's an Echo8 in the works.. Apogee Duet seconded. MOTU's Microbook looks promising but I'm hearing from people having trouble.


2

For those of you who have been using this successfully in the field, could you please post full names and model numbers of the USB battery packs/power supplies you have been using with the USBpre? Thinking of getting this to double as a 2-channel field mixer with my Fostex FR-2, as well as a PT interface.


2

The problem may be less with the hardware and more with your choice of software; Audacity isn't exactly professional-quality, and it doesn't come with ASIO support out of the box for licensing reasons. See http://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/ASIO_Audio_Interface for more information.


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