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Based on a suggestion by Jojek in a comment, I tested the DC output using a sinusoidal signal of stepped amplitude: The results are given for 90dB SPL, 80dB SPL and 70dB SPL as read on the meter display. The plot also display the RMS value of the DC signal provided by the SLM. Barring measure error, the result matches the specifications of 33 mV/dB ...


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Assuming that your app is working at all, the most likely explanation is that the microphone circuit in your tablet contains a high pass filter (a filter which removes low frequencies). This means that the sounds that are bothering you, which are low in frequency, will be recorded as much lower in level than they actually are in reality. You may be able to ...


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I believe it can be very clear in the programing language Mathematica, because you can graph and listen to a function with very similar commands. You can graph a function with this command: Plot[Sin[2*Pi*440*t],{t,0,0.003}] On the other hand, you can listen to the function if you replace Plot with Play, and replace the 0.003 (which means 3 milliseconds in ...


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If you can create points representing instantaneous amplitude (or pressure, doesn't really matter as long as you save it as a linear number rather than logarithmically) centered around a 0-line where the system is in its static state, rather than SPL, and make 44100 points per second, you have audio. The frequencies arise from the varying amplitude over time....


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Depends entirely upon the context in which you are operating. For instance: a signal that is peaking at -20dBFS is amplified by 6dB will subsequently peak at -14dBFS. a signal that is peaking at -10dBFS is attenuated by 10dB will subsequently peak at -20dBFS. This works on the basis of simple addition and subtraction. The 'combination' of more than one ...


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I was shocked that when cranked to max, the sound pressure was significantly lower than with the cheap amp. Did you measure this, or was this perceived loudness? If it's perceived loudness: distorted sound can be perceived as louder than clean sound. And this is a big difference between cheap and expensive amplifiers: the expensive one will be able to ...


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If you want the freq response curve (transfer function) of your speaker, or room, or any piece of gear you can use this software or other similar programs: https://www.rodetest.com/ Just hook up an audio interface, a line out to a power amp, and a mic and you can send sweeps thru just about anything. Much quicker I think. If you're really fancy you can ...


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