3

If you keep under the safety limits in your listening levels and time exposed and take breaks from listening (I've heard 15 minutes break per 45 minutes of listening), then I think you should be safe. Notice that ear fatigue can lead to having to raise levels in order to get the same listening sensations. That's an alarm for that you should take a break. ...


3

There's no inherent risk in prolonged use of headphones provided the volume is kept at reasonable levels (at least according to my otorhinolaryngologist). Aural isolation is not a problem, on the contrary, the protection from environmental noise provides a rest to the ears that can be beneficial. Another thing is the tiredness caused by intensive ...


3

I've found mixing in a bit of pink noise, tightly band limited (to taste) around the 'ring' frequency, can add to the realism. I've used this in an 'ear recovery' scene by slowing blending in this 'hiss' volume while simultaneously widening the band limit - then dissolving that into a bit of diffuse reverb as the scene's location ambience recovers... r


2

Try messing around with some basic sine/saw/triangle wave generator between 1 and 3 khz or so. Play around with the harmonics. To add movement to it, you can try automating some very light reverb in it or playing with the phase as well. If you automate some light saturation or resonance in it, it could make it sound more painful.


2

I created a similar effect when I recorded some feedback by accident. I actually used it later on for a short film. It can be heard in the second clip right at the end here - https://vimeo.com/41311896


2

I'm in film presentation and I'm very surprised how many edits that stand out like sore thumbs because of NTSC squeal at 15.75k. If you can't hear that high, maybe an RTA would help. High frequencies that mixers don't catch can be very annoying to some.


1

You can easily deliver stereo-like effect on a mono channel by pan-pot, but then you'd face two major problems: The result is reasonable with non-rhythmic tracks, e.g., recording of talks, but it is quite poor when it comes to music, particularly when the music's beat is highly accented. You'd probably still need directionality in order for the brain to ...


1

If you think you're hearing is not as good as it should be for your age range, then get checked out by a hearing specialist. To try and maintain your hearing: Limit exposure to loud sounds as much as possible. Calibrate your monitor system to a sane level. When working, monitor at low levels as much as possible. Wear earplugs in loud environments (...


1

Be sure that your audiologist actually tests with signal frequencies that high. All the 'standard' hearing tests I've had here in the states — including those from the House Ear Institute testing at NAMM shows — only test to 8k ! very disappointing to say the least... r


1

I tend to agree with @Bit Depth's comment. If your clients aren't having a problem, perhaps everything is fine. What you might choose to do at some point is ask some pros whose ears you trust implicitly to give you some spectral and mix balance feedback to see if they notice any issues. In general, you are probably fine to do many kinds to audio tasks. ...


1

I read your post a couple of hours ago and have been thinking about it since. If your employer and or colleagues are not complaining about the balance of your mixes it does not sound like you have a problem. Everyone is going to hear it slightly differently for a number of perceptual and physical factors and all you can do is mix it as you hear it. ...


1

@Kyle Yeah, exactly signal generator/sine wave, but don't forget what you can do with all the other sound in picture or in the mix. Having the right sound has a lot to do with context. For example, a cut-off filter on ambiences to focus attention to the 1st person, atmo reverb up and direct low, and the classic muffled heart beat and muffled breathing (...


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