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1) A DAC's job is to create an analog sound signal from digital samples. Digital audio is, at it's most basic, a series of digital samples that indicate the amount of pressure change happening at that moment (as determined by a mic creating an electrical signal based on those changes in pressure and then that electrical signal being recorded by an ADC, ...


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0dBFS 1kHz sine defines a peak value. Alignment of audio levels is usually done at an RMS level of -18dBFS or -20dBFS depending on the standard you are applying. The line level alignment level that the amplifier will use depends entirely on the manufacturer. For the sake of argument, let us consider that the alignment level is -18dBFS. -18 dBFS = 0 dBu = ...


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Digital signal is digital signal. You might not have much in the way of processing options provided by hardware on a cheap sound card, but digital output shouldn't be any different from any quality level as long as it produces the signal reliably. That said, you may be able to get a sound card with a good DAC in it cheaper than a stand alone DAC since a ...


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The only possible theoretical benefit is that the DAC is less likely to introduce artefacts, as its resolution is considerably higher than the source. I reality, this should be so negligible, I'd suggest it gives no difference to the listener.


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Strictly speaking a "DAC" is a "Digital to Analogue Converter" which is a specific and critical component of the audio processing chain that connects a digital audio processing system with your hearing. However, it is also used to describe a hardware device that works as an "external audio device" specifically for replaying higher quality audio than can be ...


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I am looking for a hardware to plug-in the headphones. Please explain WHY you can't just plug them into the existing headphone jack on your device (Macbook?) What is the difference between ... DAC A DAC is a Digital to Analog Converter. In order to actually HEAR audio out of any digital device (llike a computer or music player, etc.) you must convert the ...


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If you store at high enough sampling rate / bitrate and bit depth, digital storage will be better, because it does not degrade. Every form of analogue storage degrades over time, whether played or not, whereas digital storage will replicate the exact same output every time. The bitrate is important though, as in order to store sound digitally, you have to ...


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From a sound design point of view, digital recordings are a lot easier to edit and this opens up a world of possibilities for us. For example, editing in a DAW can be done pretty much visually but splicing tape is an art that, from what I've heard used to take years to master. And from a storage point of view, studios used to be clattered with bits of tape ...


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PS: I'm NOT talking about sending the digital output to a device with its own DAC, but more precisely producing two analog outputs. Actually, you are. For a device to have a unique audio stream, it must be associated with it's own DAC. Switching audio feeds between the various output DAC's within the sound interface is handled in software as part of the ...


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Depends on the converter. When I enter '5.1 DAC' in Amazon's search box, the first couple of results are converters with only 2 RCA outputs. There are also DACs with 6 outputs (which is what you want), like this random example. These are designed to take audio encoded as DTS, AC3 or other 5.1 codecs. If you can supply that as a source, you're ok. You just ...


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This will depend entirely on the output level from the DAC. If it is sufficient to drive the input of the PA, then you should be good, otherwise you'll want some kind of preamp before the PA input stage.


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I have great news for you! What you are trying to do (re-amping) is actually very common in the recording world, and there are boxes specifically designed for this purpose. Radial makes a great re-amping box (ProRMP). here are some links with more information http://www.radialeng.com/prormp.php https://www.puremix.net/blog/how-to-reamp-getting-out-of-the-...


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No. And of course, "theoretically" it is not "exactly the same". But 16bit resolution is more than your reproduction and listening equipment is able to deal with. Higher resolution DAC and ADC are useful in the audio creation chain. But if you are consuming a finished product, 16bit/48kHz contain more detail than you can discriminate and the weak link ...


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Sounds like a buffer problem to me. Try increasing the buffer in the software and see if it fixes the problem. Both items you bought are very decent so I doubt it's a hardware problem, especially with the symptoms you describe.


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The ADC (Analog-to-digital converter) and the DAC (Digital-to-analog converter are the gateways between the real analog world of electrons and the digital binary world; While it is possible that some converters are controllable via firmware/software and thus conceptually are upgradeable, it fundamentally imperative that some sort of hardware exist that ...


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Your title question is different to the main question you ask in the body of your post, so you may want to change it a little! However, in response to your main question:- DACs, whether external audio interfaces, or the internal audio chip in your cellphone, are just like any other piece of hardware; their performance can be tweaked and (possibly) improved ...


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All the ultra-low latency DACs are either Firewire or PCI, not USB. Completely by coincidence, I was looking at Gearslutz yesterday & came across this Audio Interface - Low Latency Performance Data Base : There's far too much data to even try to summarise, & also 29 pages of discussion over the main post. I might try to squeeze some kind of précis ...


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I have a 2008 Macbook hooked up via headphone jack to my McIntosh receiver. The sound is incredible (this is also true for my 2004 Dell laptop). I have a much newer HP laptop that puts out terrible sound through its headphone jack. Thus I purchased the dragonfly 1.5 and now it sounds fantastic. Then I put dragonfly on my 2008 Macbook. I would defy ...


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For the large part the quality of the DAC is like any other quality/price assessment: You get what you pay for. A cheap speaker set is not likely to contain a DAC better than the one in your computer/interface. However there may be a few other advantages with the external DAC: It is physically separated from the CPU and mainboard. This alone will most ...


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