5

If you're specifically after something that's versatile, the Shure SM57 is the best microphone you'll find for that budget. It can be used for pretty much anything, it sounds good live and in the studio. Even big budget studios and concerts still use them for snare drums, guitar cabs, and vocals. The more important factor you should be considering is ...


4

1) A DAC's job is to create an analog sound signal from digital samples. Digital audio is, at it's most basic, a series of digital samples that indicate the amount of pressure change happening at that moment (as determined by a mic creating an electrical signal based on those changes in pressure and then that electrical signal being recorded by an ADC, ...


3

To be honest any mic can do Foley, I've seen Foley done with an sm57 which is historically an instrument mic. Foley has much more to do with technique than what mic you are using, 80% of Foley is the art and creativity. I have done Foley with an SE1 mic which cost less than £100. As such in an emergency as long as your Foley technique is good, everything is ...


3

Working on headphones for a 5.1 mix is not a good idea. Nevertheless, what you might be looking for is a 5.1 to binaural renderer. An example of such a product can be found here : http://smyth-research.com/technology.html What I would suggest is doing most of the job (editing, premixing stems, filtering, etc.) on a stereo monitoring system (therefore ...


3

Digital signal is digital signal. You might not have much in the way of processing options provided by hardware on a cheap sound card, but digital output shouldn't be any different from any quality level as long as it produces the signal reliably. That said, you may be able to get a sound card with a good DAC in it cheaper than a stand alone DAC since a ...


2

"...is that statement true?" No, that statement is wrong. Whilst they are more sensitive they're are still directional and will reject sound from the sides. Most home studio owners own a condenser.


1

There are a few things to consider before deciding what equipment you need because there are so many options; Such as, budget and how large of an area you need to cover with the system. You can buy portable rack mount cases from a few websites. You will also need to buy a mixing console with a number of inputs that matches or exceeds your mics/computer ...


1

I would seriously consider a good lavalier mic. You can get a variety of clips & adapters to fit them to just about anything & so tiny you can hardly tell it's there. You can use them wired or wireless. My absolute favourite is the DPA 4060 - however, they're about £$€ 400, not cheap at all - but you can give this mic any job & it will do it ...


1

Both of the ones you have selected are good units, you will always encounter problems in this situation. Zoom as Tascam also make some nice units but much of what I have read about them is in relation to recording things like live concerts. When you watch those great videos of lectures chances are the speaker is wearing a mic (or at least standing in front ...


1

These are really broad questions. In terms of a mic. At $50 your in the Chinese unbranded territory type of microphone and most (I would imagine) couldn't give you an opinion on one that would be worthwhile. You really need to be in the $200 range before your getting into worthy entry level. I would look for a second hand bargain on eBay. Maybe old sm57 or ...


1

I own the sontronics stc 3x and use it at home all the time it has a unidirectional polar pattern which helps to reject some of the background noise , and quality turns out to be decent.


1

Yes the Lavalier can go to directly into a smartphone, just make sure you purchase the Micon11 connector together with the Lav. The Lavalier needs one of the "Micon" connectors to work anyway, it's a modular system that allows you to use the Lavalier with a whole range of devices, from 3.5mm minijack, XLR, smartphones (TRRS) or various brands of wireless ...


1

At that price range it really isn't all that important as most will have similar build/sound quality. It's not until you get in the hundreds of dollars when it becomes a choice of sonic qualities. Most people would regard a $70 mic as garbage. The question you should ask is, will it work? And how long for?


1

Yes, that microphone is probably reasonably good. It is very low-price compared to the kinds of microphones found in professional studios. However many of those cheap Chinese clones perform remarkably well considering their very low price.


1

Firewire ports are definitely hard to find on a PC laptop; I'd suggest looking for USB3 or eSATA instead. You'd need a new external, though, but non-SSD hard drives are silly-cheap per Tb these days. A couple of things extra to mention; firstly, PT8 is a 32-bit application, so its only ever going to be able to use about 3Gb at most of your RAM, even if ...


1

If you're looking for something legit, you're probably out of luck. I've made this search many times before and came up dry. Lots of splitters, but no mixers. Your best bet is probably this. It's a super basic "rat's nest" electronics project, and you should be able to pick up the components for pretty cheap. Any RadioShack will carry them, and you might ...


1

you could buy a (2nd hand) behringer mixer and some rca>jack adapters: http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/UB1002FX.aspx not a perfect but a cheap solution


1

Hello there! Well, I would go for great mics first, then splash on a recorder later. I mean, great mics have been pretty much the same (makes, models, technology) for decades, while recorders keep getting better, smaller, cheaper every year. OTOH, if working on a production requires a recorder with timecode, then a Zoom won't cut it...


1

Just find this thread here :)


1

Interressting. Seems to be somehow affordeble. Are there some testers of this anywhere ?


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