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...if most consumer-grade audio playback systems are not designed to be flat or accurate, why is it considered practical to write, mix, or master your music on "flat" monitors? Because most consumer-grade audio playback systems are not flat or accurate... The goal of a "flat" near-field studio monitor is to let you hear what is actually going on, while ...


3

May I ask what kind of experience you have in the audio field? It would help us give a more useful answer for you, with the right level of detail. I'll offer a general response for now though: You've got two options: Record your piano piece straight into audio editing software. Audacity would be a good choice if you don't have a favourite already; it's ...


3

If you take a look at any studio you will most likely see a few sets of monitors in them, someone beat me to the NS-10's but its worth going into a bit more depth on why they are so important historically. First off flat monitors (or close to flat) are useful as they generally have a wide range and you can hear everything you need to though them from bass ...


3

I would like to expand on the caveat in @Rory Alsop's answer, since to me he answers one part of your question (can I play it back so I can hear it?) while relegating the arguably far less trivial part (can I record an ultra/infrasonic sound?) to a caveat. So what are the hardware/software requirements to record inaudible frequencies? I will concentrate on ...


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Two possibilities I can think of. First, if they are in-ear headphones (typically have some foam or soft plastic sleeve that looks like it could fit in to your ear) then they are actually designed to be inserted in to your ears. Improper insertion can result in bad sound transmission and very poor sound quality, particularly on the lower ends. It would ...


2

I have researched this several months ago and I did not find a solution. When you say "Each headphone would have a USB dongle." I assume that you mean that each headphone will have its own BlueTooth transmitter. But the problem is getting some way to send the audio presentation out through several USB outputs concurrently. There may be expensive ...


2

A MIDI file only contains information on which notes you're playing. The sound attached to each note is not part of the file (which is why a MIDI file is much smaller than an audio file). What you're looking for is a sound module or software synthesizer that can replicate the sound of your Yamaha keyboard. One common format for this is a VST plugin - a ...


2

Let's assume it's a problem with audio signal flow within Cubase (the version I'm going off of is Cubase 7 or 8 Pro): In Devices > Device Setup..., under VST Audio System, make sure that your device driver is the one selected in the dropdown menu at the top of the window. In the same menu, click on your device name in the list under VST Audio System and ...


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try importing the audio into another DAW or audio player and do some elimination testing.


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There is a program called PhonoPaper made by a Russian group. It is essentially a graphical representation of sound that can be read by a camera and specific software. Quite cool, if somewhat novel. http://warmplace.ru/soft/phonopaper/ There is possibly some way of reading a sonograph image back into sound. Perhaps look into SSTV technology too which is ...


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The pinned playback is available on a freshly downloaded 2.2.0 Mac Audacity.


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Seems like you should be able to use midi messages to launch clips from within Ableton, rather than doing it from within a drum-rack. That might be easier, and you wont be ham-strung by the volume envelope of a simpler/sampler device. If you use the Release Enabled mode on the Sampler device, that should do what you need. It's the button (it looks like ->|...


1

I've used Native Instruments Kontakt sampler to achieve exactly what you're looking for, to produce a radio show with pre-configured audio clips mapped to different notes of a MIDI keyboard. It's able to do one-shot sample playback and can certainly manage more that 60 seconds (which seems very limiting of Ableton!). Maybe there's a cheaper option out there ...


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It controls how loud you want the playback to be. By playback we mean pre-recorded material (it was recorded first and now you 'play (it) back').


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Well it turns out that I had something plugged into the headphones socket which gates the outputs to the monitors. It works!


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This is very easy to do in Ableton with follow actions, but you can probably get a similar effect in Logic with EXS24. Load a dozen or so samples into an instance of EXS24, then use Logic's arpeggiator to throw random notes at it. You may need to use multiple instances of EXS24 in order to make use of all 400 of your clips.


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Maybe this software would be of some help: http://soundplant.org/


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Audition version 12 (CC 2019) To prevent auto-scroll from being turned on, uncheck: Edit ► Preferences ► Playback ► Enable auto-scroll when starting playback or recording To disable auto-scroll when it is on, press A or press the auto-scroll button at the top-right of the timeline Audition version 5 (CS 6) and above Edit ► Preferences ► Playback ► ...


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Studio monitors are very practical, not to mention an all-around wise choice. The two foremost reasons in my mind are: 1) As an engineer, you NEED to be able to hear exactly what's going on in your audio... no more, no less. Studio monitors gives you this ability - depending on what grade of monitor you purchase. Consumer payback systems cannot give the ...


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