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8

The easiest solution would be to just use apple's say text-to-speech program. Try $ say hello on the command line. Any sound can be broken down into a series of sine waves. The easy way to do that is via the Fourier Transformation. Then you can re-synthesizer with an inverse-fourier tranformation, which essentially means playing back the sine waves with the ...


8

To reflect on your first question, Randy is referring to a psychoacoustic principle that falls under something called "scene analysis." I don't know that he's necessarily read a ton on psychoacoustics...but whether or not he has, the different effects are something that you begin to pick up on after a certain amount of experience. Basically, what's going on ...


6

The first is that he said that one of his huge trade secrets in sound design are sounds that continually change in pitch just slightly. This way, they clash less with music and dialog and can be heard better through the mix because they're constantly changing. This makes a tone of sense and is genious. The question is...what would you use to do that? I ...


6

You are most likely experiencing the non-linear frequency reception of the human hearing and the frequency response in your playback system. As listener you perceive a constant loudness of steady tones roughy following this chart (Equal loudness contours or "Fletcher-Munson" curves): In addition your headphones or speakers frequency response curve is also ...


5

Drum tuning is largely dependent on the style of music being played. A jazz kit will usually be tuned to exact pitches in a scale, such as the snare being tuned to the root, one tom tuned to the fifth, one to the third, one to the root an octave lower, etc. A jazz kit will also usually be tuned such that the top and bottom heads are in tune with each other....


5

I think you've misunderstood what Frequency is, with respect to audio. Whilst 'Frequency' typically is 'how frequently something occurs', in audio it's how many times a sine-wave oscillates in a second, rather than how many things you hear in a second. eg. A standard kick-drum track at 60 BPM means you'll hear a kick-drum sound once-per-second. That actual ...


5

There is a MIDI spec for sending MIDI Tuning Messages, but not all synthesizers support it. Some specific synths that have good support for alternative tunings: The Access Virus has a sophisticated predictive system called Pure Tuning (seems to have been around since the Virus C, also present in the more recent TI series) Korg is generally very good about ...


5

Unfortunately your theory of how the human voice is made up is not accurate enough to make this possible - you just can't get the detail. However, there are a wide range of examples of partial emulation of vocal tones, using combinations of effects and notes - see Steve Vai's guitar at the start of California Girls or Greasy Kid's Stuff for a couple. He ...


4

Two thoughts... 1) The song is currently in the wrong key for the sound you are aiming for, vocally. The only fix for that would really be to re-record it in a more suitable key. 2) There are plugins available that can adjust the formant** of a sound without changing the pitch. Probably the best tool available for that is Melodyne [imho] which can adjust ...


3

As you mention that you have experience in programming, the Essentia library might fit your need. Essentia is an open-source C++ library for audio analysis and audio-based music information retrieval released under the Affero GPLv3 license (also available under proprietary license upon request). It contains an extensive collection of reusable ...


3

There is a VERY simple way to do this, as I have needed the exact same effect before. Click in an empty plugin window, go to Audio Units > Apple > AUpitch this will allow you many many semitones of pitch shift with the ability to automate smooth changes. Hope this helps


3

Have you tried that? http://www.littleendian.com/overview/


3

You're talking about a sampler. Anything else (an effect plugin) will eventually require an infinite amount of memory as you fill up its buffers faster than you can empty them. Then there's the problem with knowing when to start playing slowly. Look for the varispeed elastic track modes on your DAW.


2

http://serato.com/pitchntime-pro ^^^^^^This will do exactly what your looking for, I literally use this plugin everyday. Its really easy to use and you'll get the results you want instantly. I highly recommend pitch n time pro.


2

No it isn't; neither is it possible in wavelab or any other piece of software I've come across. Maybe someone out there knows differently? What you are asking about is the ability of software to detect (sometimes) very subtle changes in pitch. Vocal pitch changes are not uncommon even for the most perfect of singer and it is the human brain that ultimately ...


2

The generic term for this is vibrato, though it wouldn't usually move 'between octaves' but rather in smaller increments like semitones. Applying a low-frequency oscillator to the pitch pin on a tone oscillator would achieve the effect. The amplitude of the LFO would control the degree of pitch shift over time, and its frequency would affect how rapidly it ...


2

Sample rate or playback rate is just the speed at which your software or hardware reads through the audio buffer and plays back what it finds. Just adjusting the sample rate speeds up or slows down the rate at which the waveform is read, which effectively shortens or lengthens the waveform contained within. Consider a 440 Hz Sine wave. If you play that sine ...


2

Sounds like you're looking for an arpeggiator. With some plugins, you can either program a step-sequenced arpeggio, which triggers on a MIDI note event. These will mostly be atonal/chromatic, and won't necessarily adhere to any scales that you're using. There may be some that have this intelligence however.


2

It is possible to do a smooth pitch bend with Logic and the Pitch Shifter II plugin, but it isn't easy. The core problem is that Logic is built around MIDI, and most MIDI messages are 7-bit. A 7-bit number can represent any of 127 different values, which isn't very many when you are dealing with pitch bends. Fortunately, Logic does support a special kind of ...


2

Processing has good sound libraries such as Minim and apparently a new factory library check this link.


2

Firstly it's nice to see someone making use of RS5000! Sadly, though, it works in the same way as most samplers in that it achieves the pitch changes simply by playing back the sample data at different speeds. Within Reaper you could do the work using ReaPitch which would also allow you to do formant correction to compensate for the vocal sounding ...


2

The smallest interval a human can hear depends somewhat on the register and timbre of the tone (and it varies from person to person), but generally speaking the smallest detectable difference is around 5-6 cents, according to this study from 2006: D.B. Loeffler, "Instrument Timbres and Pitch Estimation in Polyphonic Music Archived 2007-12-18 at the Wayback ...


2

It's going to be difficult to come up with an absolute number, because it will vary greatly between individuals. I suspect it will also vary with age, exposure to music, and any number of other factors. That being said, this question has been asked on some of our sister sites: https://biology.stackexchange.com/questions/31059/whats-the-frequency-resolution-...


2

In the most basic form of pitch-shifting, we play a sample faster or slower. This has some side effects along with the desired pitch shifting - the duration and the formant of the sound are also shifted. In your case, like Thomas already mentioned, it is the shifted formant that causes the squeakiness. A formant is formed by the resonances inside a ...


2

There‘s a tab where you can set the algorithm. Usually setting it to „melody“ should fix this.


2

There is no 100% certain way to determine which equal-tempered scale standard was used as tuning basis for a song. However the vast majority is A440. Many electronic instruments don't really give you any choice. However you ask how to determine it. You'll need to do a spectrum analysis and sum up the energy around the fundamental frequencies of the scales. ...


1

It's simple really; Your speakers can't reproduce a 1Hz sinewave, and if it could, you wouldn't hear it due to the limits of human hearing(plus, due to the size of the speaker cone, it would have very little energy). If your speaker could reproduce a 1Hz sinewave, you would see the speaker cone moving in and out with a one second period. If you were to play ...


1

There is: Surfer Eq by Sound Radix: http://www.soundradix.com/products/surfer-eq EDIT: Just clarification on the plug-in: It bases the EQ curve on the fundamental pitch of the source material, so it will shift in response to changes in pitch. Meant mostly for instruments or tonal material (music) but also useful for sound design.


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