11

I guess you'll be able to reach the desired result by applying these effects: EQ - Boost around 2KHz and cut everywhere else. (You can play with the frequencies and see which one suits you the best. To do that just boost one frequency and swipe it across the area). Distortion - After setting the EQ, you could add just a bit of distortion to the signal. P.S....


8

The easiest solution would be to just use apple's say text-to-speech program. Try $ say hello on the command line. Any sound can be broken down into a series of sine waves. The easy way to do that is via the Fourier Transformation. Then you can re-synthesizer with an inverse-fourier tranformation, which essentially means playing back the sine waves with the ...


6

Unfortunately the plugin settings are non-automatable, so I found a workaround: I created a summing track stack with the necessary registrations as subtracks, and I mute them when the corresponding registration is not selected (using automation). This way, I can even mix various registrations like organ stops (e.g. Principal + Flute) or use another ...


5

Unfortunately your theory of how the human voice is made up is not accurate enough to make this possible - you just can't get the detail. However, there are a wide range of examples of partial emulation of vocal tones, using combinations of effects and notes - see Steve Vai's guitar at the start of California Girls or Greasy Kid's Stuff for a couple. He ...


5

I haven't personally worked with Logic or Mainstage much, but the basic steps I'm outlining here seem to be fairly DAW-agnostic, and I have applied them in both Reaper and Ableton Live so I presume they work similarly. I'll talk about Logic here since that seems to be the more common choice. Concepts There are a couple of basic ideas you're going to use ...


5

Filtering a signal to remove certain parts of the spectrum on the face of it (and intuitively) should reduce the perceived sound level. This is what common-sense would tell us. However, when it comes to the reshaping of sound with filtering, lowering the sound level doesn't always equate to lowering the peak level. Yes, the perceived sound level may reduce ...


5

I don't know for ES2 in particular (as I've not used it), but in other synthesizers this can mean that an oscillator waveform is not starting on a zero-crossing when the key is depressed. If this is the case, you have one of two immediate options: Adjust the phase of the oscillator, or alternately, force the oscillator to always begin on a zero-crossing. ...


4

I'm not sure how deep AppleScript support in Logic is, but that would be the first place to check. If AppleScript won't do it, then you might try just directly processing MIDI. If you don't need results in real time, then it is easy. Just code up a MIDI processor using your favorite language and library (easy libraries exist for perl and Python. I suspect ...


4

That is Apple's Logic in mixer view. You can see another view of the mixer under the heading "Pro mixing in all its glory" here.


4

It's because it's a summed audio track. There are peaks and valleys now that have completely changed. think of three separate waveforms with totally different wavelengths. Now, you imagine the peaks and valleys getting summed together. Suppose that you remove the longest ( lowest ) wave. Now you will have parts that are quieter and parts that are louder ...


4

I believe you can use the Flex Tool you mentioned in your comment to do what you want. Here is a tutorial explaining how: http://apple-logic-studio.wonderhowto.com/how-to/warp-time-with-flex-time-tool-logic-pro-9-398064/ Hitting Command + T when you have the matching number of measures selected in the cycle region, the audio clip in the track you have ...


4

The best way I can think of removing the vocals is splitting the stereo track into its respective left and right mono channels. After that, invert the phase of one of the mono channels and you will get the vocals cancelled out. The downside to this is that there is a high possibility that it might change how the stereo track originally sounded like. Another ...


4

If your aim is to simply be able to see the buss/aux tracks in the "Tracks area"... http://support.apple.com/kb/PH13024?viewlocale=en_US ...then you can make the "busses"/"auxes" visible in the "Tracks area". This can be done by going in the "Mixer" window and Ctrl clicking anywhere in the channel strip you want to have shown in the "Tracks area". Then ...


4

To move the whole automation, you have to select the entire area of the automation first, then move it. BUT.. This is a common problem, that pretty much everyone solves the same way. Do not under any circumstances automate the final volume of a track...EVER. In Ableton you drop a utility effect on the track and use it to do volume automation. This way ...


4

We call 'wet', the return from an FX processor. 'Dry' is the input signal to the effect. So if you turn 'wet' down and 'dry' up, the signal will pass through the effects unit unchanged. The reason many effects units have a dry/wet setting is so you can either use them as insert effects, or send effects. An insert effect is one where all of a channel's ...


3

In Live, the spacebar plays from the start marker position. However, fn + left arrow (OSX) or Home (Win) should move the playhead to the beginning. If you're using a MIDI controller for transport control, you can double-tap the "Stop" button which will return the marker to the beginning as well.


3

You can either trim the end of the region by dragging it from the right bottom corner of the region. Or you can use the scissors tool (Esc, then 5), split the region 8 bars in and delete the half that is silent (then double click Esc to go back to the pointer tool). Alternatively, in the piano roll, you can set the end marker for the region - it is shown ...


3

This is the case with many mid to high end audio hardware - the compute intensive tasks are handed off to processors on the card so that your CPU doesn't need to handle them. For creating/mastering/mixing multilayer projects, especially those with plugins or real-time effects or transitions in any DAW I would recommend an external card to handle these tasks....


3

First off, I think it's cool they didn't just ask you to make it sound like Transformers! But I think it's a difficult task because the sound in the clip is very stylised and not actually in very tight sync to the action. It feels like you hear more swooping/flying around and atmos than actual synchronised movement sounds, so perhaps part of the challenge ...


3

I'm not going to say which platform is better, but when I'm hiring new people at our post facility, if they don't know Protools they usually don't make it past the first round of cuts. I'd take advantage of the educational discount if you can, it will give you a leg up knowing multiple platforms.


3

There's a lot of indirect value to owning pro tools, from hundreds of people across the globe being able to relate when you (inevitably) start cursing its limitations or bugs, to actually being able to hand your work down the standard role chain of bigger post-production projects. Pro Tools 9 (and 10) is excellent value, even the vanilla (non-HD) package, ...


3

I feel your choice of plugins might get you near the sound you want to hear in your song (heck, they might even get you somewhere better!) but as for recreating the distinct sound of AM radio (specifically AM TALK radio)... well, I'll just say that your way seems like WAY more work than it needs to be and start with the explanation. Before we start ...


3

Phase inversion may help. Take a clean (no post-processing) mono vocal track and a clean mono instrument track. Invert the phase of one of them, and start playback. Listen closely while adjusting the relative playback positions of the tracks (offsetting a few samples at a time), to bring them closer to phase alignment. You may notice a slight improvement ...


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