14

You're likely to find that artists that have basslines that stick out well on both proper studio monitors as well as crappy laptop speakers are utilizing a bunch of layering of sounds to create a cohesive bass sound that spans various frequencies (besides the low ones you'd expect). Even when I'm using a bass sound that is essentially a sub (sine wave) bass,...


13

There are a few misconceptions here. Normalization, in the most basic sense, raises the gain of the ENTIRE track to a nominal level. What you are trying to do with normalization is maximize signal. The relative dynamics of the track are not changed. There are actually two types of normalization, but the most common is peak normalization, where the loudest ...


12

Ok the first and most important thing to realise is that dB is a relative scale, it is essentially a ratio but because we deal with such large ratios it is also a logarithmic scale to make the numbers more manageable. So to use dB as a measurement we need to specify a reference point. For dBu, the reference - 0dBu is 0.775volt. Now dBu is a measurement of ...


8

On the microphone front, you will find that a lot of the better quality microphones have XLR connectors and many require phantom power. Because of this, you can't simply buy a good microphone and plug it straight into your computer without an good audio interface as well. However, for screencasting, where you generally require just one microphone, you can ...


8

This is just a limited (or clipped through distortion) sound wave added through the normal mixing process, to a lower frequency soundwave. I've created a simple example to demonstrate what I mean. The higher frequency sound wave; Let's pretend it's a nice brass instrument: The brass instrument is then clipped for whatever reason: The ...


7

There are two questions here that I think should be addressed separately: Question 1: "is this a bad method of practice?" As I understand it, the reason it's considered "better" to compress individual tracks and not the master bus is because you have a finer degree of control, especially in today's digital world where you could instance a compressor on ...


7

There are 5 stages/phases in a Album production: Recording > Editing > Mixing > Mastering > Printing. It's worth naming "Pre-production", which is before the 5 steps and can be very important to make things go better. Pre-production can be a wide variety of things. All from making the music arrangements, defining artist identity, vision, and intention; to ...


6

Your real problem is most likely recording technique and possibly the gear you're using. A good sound recorded properly doesn't need any EQ to sound professional. Where you place your microphone is the most important thing in capturing a sound and works just like EQing when in the right hands.


6

The important thing about such sounds is that the sources aren't coherent, neither the deviations in rythm and frequency nor the actual audio phases and amplitudes follow any predictable relationships. That's unlike the extra signals normal chorus/delay/phaser effects add, where the modulation is usually at best periodic and the relation very simple, only ...


6

There's possibly not really enough space in a stack exchange answer to actually get to the root of the problem ... though I see the other answers have made valiant efforts, and no doubt you should study these, and they may indeed cover the answer, but still ... The fact that you a) notice, and b) have the humility to ask shows me that you both have an ear (...


5

I think your decision not to master these recordings is a good one. It's definitely a violation of Union rules to put group ADR in your personal library. Those actors rely on sessions to make a living (sometimes a very good living, but they gotta eat). Good group ADR actors can bring alot to making a project come alive, so it's best to keep them in business....


5

Templates, templates, templates Know your hot keys front and back To do the above, practice, practice, practice so it becomes muscle memory As George said, organize your workflow into jobs, passes, or procedures - scattered workflow is the quickest way to get gummed up - in it's most simply form, do all editorial together as one, and do all mixing/processing ...


5

To get the Kickdrum out of Laptopspeakers -> Layer a small click sound, rimshot, hi hat, etc. To get the Bass out -> layer it with saws or use parallel distortion or fm to get some higher harmonics out edit: also the right amount of white and pink noise can give the impression of a burst -> helps with those edm genres to give a big bass drop on small ...


5

The process you're describing is broadly known as mixing, and there are a few basic parts to it: Setting volume levels appropriately using track levels and equalizers Moving the sounds left and right in the stereo field (known as panning) Moving the sounds "forward" and "backward" in the mix, generally done using a reverberation effect Getting a good blend ...


5

No, that doesn't make much sense. The point of a maximiser/limiter is to exploit the 0dBFS range as thoroughly as possible, but 0dBFS is only a meaningful range at the very end of the mastering process: it's the highest level that can be expressed by the consumer format you're exporting to. OTOH, digital plugins use floating-point arithmetic internally, ...


5

Back in the days of analog & vinyl, rolling off the extreme bass frequencies had three primary reasons . No-one would ever hear it the needle would tend to get thrown out of the groove with extremely low frequencies, especially if it wasn't centred, or was out of phase. There is far more energy needed to shift bass than treble, so the overall volume ...


5

Here, is there any common low-end level that every song should has? No or Does it just set by ear? Yes. In fact, it should be set by ear, not by eyes. Don't bother with what the spectrum analyzer tells you, it is dumb and doesn't know or say very much. You have to listen for the right sounds. or Does it depend on the music genres? Definitely. Hip-...


4

You can use something like Waves MaxxBass or RBass to create upper harmonics that can be heard on smaller speakers. You could also saturate or distort the mid to high end on a separate track and blend it in with the original.


4

Obviously, you need to find the correct frequencies – what gives definition to the kick is actually something like 6000 Hz rather than the bass frequencies. But the most important thing is, trivially, that the kick is simply loud enough. It is the only instrument you should allow to reach 0 dB. Don't try to get your mix loud by giving too much power to the ...


4

One thing that would help us help you a lot better is you posting your kick+bass mix, and the kick and bass separately. That way we can solve the issue and tell you how we did it and what you probably were doing wrong. Otherwise we are stuck around a thousand possibilities of who knows what is your problem. I suggest you to do this so we can give you a more ...


4

In addition to jdlugosz's comment about its effect when the sound is reproduced (which should be an answer) it also provides additional headroom in the (digital) recording itself. The sub 30Hz content could push higher frequency content above the top of the scale. Since it's not going to get reproduced, there is no harm in removing it, and there is the ...


4

You will note that this emulates the effect of a DC blocking capacitor, in a record player on clipped vinyl... i.e. no 0Hz being passed. This waveform's clipping slopes exclusively the same way, towards zero. Unless this were a mixture of a triangle, and a square (clipped) wave, of the same frequency, with a phase difference of 90 degrees, Marc W's example ...


4

This is a very big topic, I will start by redirecting you to a very useful site/article: Mastering for Vinyl from Recording magazine. Also I would like to state that I'm not a mastering engineer, I'm a mixing engineer only working with analog gear, so I'll try to tell you what we keep in mind when going for vinyl. The article is far more detailed and ...


4

"I mix everything as loud as possible". There is your problem. Right there. Mixing music is not about making it "loud". If you think it is, you are focussing on the wrong thing entirely. There are any number of resources available to you to learn how to mix - too many to list here. One tip I will give you is to focus on spectral balance and dynamic range....


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