8

Paper spike tape. Not that sticky, good for sensitive surfaces. Gaffer's tape. Stickier, the standard, gentle on most surfaces. 3M Micropore tape. Excellent for lav placement. Double-sided wig/toupee tape, for similar. Self-adhesive Dr. Scholls moleskine, for buffering the edges of a lav from cloth rubbing when concealed. Electrical tape, for its actual ...


8

It's important to remember that a compressor does not make a sound louder, it reduces dynamic range. By bringing down the peak values, you give yourself more headroom to bring up the overall signal level (so the quieter parts can be louder). It is that "make up gain" which makes a sound louder, not the act of compression. The choice between using ...


6

It really depends on you. If your DAW (Ableton) does everything you want, then you're good to go. VSTs come in when you want to do more. You may decide the reverb isn't quite what you want, or you'd want a vintage synth, or orchestra, or electric piano sound, or better drums beyond what comes in the package... that's the time to look at VSTs. That's not ...


6

Forum suitability: sure, this concerns music production much more than music playing, so it would seem more appropriate here. Generic kernel will make dropouts ("xruns") more likely even when using jackd with realtime priority. The jitter introduced in Midi is not that much of an issue since signals are time-stamped in the kernel and traditional 31250bps ...


5

It depends on the sound I'm trying to create ;). Pragmatically, it also depends upon the availability of a quiet, reflection-free outdoor spot vs. a foley studio — both of which can be hard to find (or afford). A project that calls for a more stylized foley track might best be served by a foley studio with an enormous assortment of props, shoes, pits, cloth,...


5

For electronic, hip hop and house, you should be able to get a lot done with samples of the classic drum machines. Things like the Roland TR-808 and TR-909, the Linn Drum, and other classics. If you google around, you can find plenty of free or donationware sets. There are also commercial sets that are very nice, though most good software samplers will come ...


5

No, that doesn't make much sense. The point of a maximiser/limiter is to exploit the 0dBFS range as thoroughly as possible, but 0dBFS is only a meaningful range at the very end of the mastering process: it's the highest level that can be expressed by the consumer format you're exporting to. OTOH, digital plugins use floating-point arithmetic internally, ...


4

Here are some techniques and things I used improperly for a long time that I think will help you. Luckily for you, I've researched a lot of techniques for dubstep and EDM in general. And I have a lot of experience with NI Massive. What I did for a long time was use the EQ too boost the loudness of my instruments which is NOT what you want to do. Using the ...


4

Assuming we're thinking about the same thing, it's not octaves, it's harmonics. The difference being that harmonics are doubles of the original harmonic, meaning for example the first overtone of 250Hz being 500, the secon one being 750 and so on. They are pretty hard to come by because they are mainly used to remove hum and such, though it can indeed be ...


3

I'm not a FL Studio user, but I'd be surprised to find that there are no active forums full of FL Studio users. That said, the other DAWs you suggest break down as follows: ProTools is said to be great at audio and weak at MIDI. It seems to be the go-to choice for full-serivce professional studios. As far as I know, you can't run VSTs natively in ProTools, ...


3

Here are the tapes I most often use on set: Medical Transpore tape (same as micropore above)_works well for placing lavs on actors skin and clothes. Medical Cloth tape (white)_When transpore doesn't work and for concealing wires on or beneath white clothing. Waterproof medical tape (skin tone)_used occasionally for moist situations and for concealing wires ...


3

Hi there, make sure you check out Designing Sound from Andy Farnell. The book takes a practical, systematic approach to the subject, teaching by example and providing background information that offers a firm theoretical context for its pragmatic stance. Many of the examples follow a pattern, beginning with a discussion of the nature and physics of a ...


3

Real Life delivery formats 44.1/48 kHz @ 16/24 bits Files formats Specification of the Broadcast Wave Format (BWF) - EBU RF64: An Extended File Format for Audio - EBU Standard Mixing Levels for Movie Theater, DVD, TV, Internet, Radio and Games gearslutz thread Interfaces AES/EBU TV : ATSC A/85 EBU R128 Video Game Sony ASWG Apple iTune Mastered ...


3

Vienna Ensemble Pro Take a look at Vienna Ensemble Pro (VEP, VEPro). There is a Master/Slave feature that let you process VST instruments (and ordinary VST effects) on other computers (and you can mix Macs and PCs). The master sends MIDI commands to the slave, and the slave returns the result samples. All through a plain cabled ethernet connection. Here ...


2

I recommend looking into a free online course from a site like Coursera . There are also plenty of books available: The Sound Reinforcement Handbook by Gary Davis or Modern Recording Techniques by Huber could be a good resource for learning about the subjects you mentioned.


2

If you want to make modern electronic music you will need something else that the good old TRs ;) You can try a slightly different approach than pure samples if that's an option. As a producer of European electronic music I found ReFX's Nexus helpful from time to time. This is a so-called ROMpler (software based), a mix between sampler and synth, which ...


2

Loudon Stearns of Berkleemusic.com runs Introduction to Music Production course on Coursera. It's free. I can't recommend Loudon's courses high enough. If you hooked up, you may also choose to take his paid Berkleemusic.com course. It will blow you away. I promise. As for the choice of gear and software, it strongly depends on the kind of music you want to ...


2

A solid understanding of, and lots of experience with mixing is of course difficult to do without. But I wouldn't necessarily consider that a trick. I think one of the industry standard tricks is TC Electronic's Finalizer. It uses a combination of frequency based compression, limiters, normalizers, etc. to really fill out the frequency space. They're not ...


2

Ah the loudness war... Some of what you can do is in the mix... take out what you don't need. If you don't need above 400Hz in a pad, then cut below 400Hz on that pad. You might not hear a difference but that will have been adding to your audio level. Low cut everything you possibly can to where you possibly can... As you mentioned club music, then ...


2

I'm honestly not sure what you are asking here. Compression does not increase the "volume" of a signal, it decreases it. Compression makes a quiet portion of the sounds louder relative to a louder portion by reducing the signal strength when the signal strength is high. Often a gain is applied after compression to keep the signal strength up, but this ...


2

Pan and EQ each differently. Then mix them all to provide a wash/bed. Then ride the levels so that they take turns "poking" out.


2

The only way to do this would be to use a vibration meter that records vibration spikes on a graph. This would be similar to the machines that detect earth quakes, volcano eruptions. If you mean record the vibrations in some type of sound format, this is impossible sound IS vibration, they are not two separate things if you did not want any sound then you ...


2

To sum up the 3 general steps you have listed (Lets use a rock band as an example) 1. Make Song (Record Initial Tracks): This is typically the stage where the audio is actually recorded and the sampled/synthesized tracks are created. This is the stage that occurs in what most people call a "Recording Studio". In keeping with our example this is the stage ...


2

Dave's answer is correct, However, in the context of FL Studio and electronic music in general these steps are much more intermingled...for example, if a shuddering kick drum is an important element in your track you may want to work on the filters, reverb, compression, saturation, for that while still sketching out other elements, so you will get a better ...


2

Tempo can be an illusion. I suspect what is happening is that your loop sounds great at 191 (it was written that way) but at 96, different things stick out. Things that sounded good with speed might seem to drag, because the swing or pulse was never meant to be the focus, and now those things are made much more obvious. I'm just sort of shooting in the ...


2

Headphones are not really optional for recording vocals, because you don't want the backing tracks to bleed into the vocal mic (usually). Also, you should look at some kind of acoustic treatment. The best thing to have would be a walk-in closet where you can set up the vocal mic and headphones and put up some treatment to diffuse and absorb sound to reduce ...


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