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8

One of my classmates at Vancouver Film School is 47 years old and has no experience in sound design and is actually good at his work. Its how badly you wanna learn. As far as finding a job goes, I know people who've been in this field for a very long time but still don't have a job. Finding a job has got to do more with how good you are at your work (1st) ...


6

The CME UF-series keyboards support a built-in MIDI-over-wireless system. My first guess was the Rockband wireless keyboard. Unfortunately, it doesn't appear to transmit MIDI data over its bluetooth connection. If you are up for a DIY project, here are some instructions on building a wireless MIDI link using XBee radios. Should be able to fit inside the ...


5

Pretty certainly yes to 1 here, this is an area where most PC laptop manufacturers apparently don't care for quality at all – namely, to answer 2, they tend to use the cheapest microphones and preamps available (it has little to do with software), which is IMO absolutely ok because 3. you should always use external microphones if you care for quality at all, ...


5

how far away? is your macbook air connected to speakers? Your file has a "loudness" (RMS level) -> player volume (gain) -> system volume (gain) -> audio interface voltage specs (gain/level) -> amp (gain) -> speakers (sensitivity). So it's impractical to try and "compute" it with that many variables. Grab an SPL meter. There are SPL meter smartphone apps ...


4

Drive 1 - Put the OS, all applications, plug-ins etc Drive 2 - All media, so projects, samples, audio content etc. The basic rule is that the operating system and applications should be on a drive together and you shouldn't put any media on that drive. S all projects, samples etc on the second and subsequent drives. Hope that helps, Mike.


4

Here is 4 channels for $250 with mic pre amps and dedicated outputs should you need them. There are a handful of 2 channel units for under 200 here is a 4 channel right at the $200 mark. You are brushing right up on the lowest quality level at that price. You may sacrifice quite a bit of quality which may impair what ever research you are doing. Side note: ...


3

Just do it. Know that you're taking a risk financially, because there's no guarantee for work (you have to be active in finding it) and there are a lot of people working in and studying for the field, with the same or stronger determination as you. So you need to be active in networking and giving yourself out as someone that people trust and will want to ...


3

No you are not to old. I started at 30 and have been doing it successfully for 28 years now. Get an entry level job (driver, apprentice, assistant) at a sound house. You will meet people and you will learn how it is really done. A HUGE part of success is who you know. You will find out quickly if you have the feel, the talent, the creativity and the ...


3

I hate to bring bad news but I don't think you can have a single NTFS or HFS+J/HFSX filesystem that will work stable to read and write data across both Windows and OS X computers. In 15 years of fiddling with drives and all sorts of filesystems I haven't once found a software solution that would write in a reliable way to a non-native FS, especially long ...


3

Audio monitoring is application dependent. For example, when using Ableton Live all you have to do is to set up a channel using EXT.IN (or whatever input your using) and change the the monitoring from AUTO to ON. Most application will have you change the monitoring of a specific channel to on - some of them you'll just need to 'arm' the track, which ...


3

The right way to do this is open the project in GarageBand and export each track as its own audio file. Then you can import the audio files into a PC-based multichannel audio editor and continue working. Failing that, though, notice that the GarageBand project is a folder, and inside the folder there is a “Media” folder that contains the individual audio ...


2

Sonnox makes a plugin for music mixers to quickly A/B what different MP3/AAC bit rates will sound like. It might be the solution that you are looking for. http://www.sonnoxplugins.com/pub/plugins/products/pro-codec.htm


2

Just to echo, here's my desktop rig: Drive 1 (120GB SSD) - OS, Applications, Plugins Drive 2 (1.5 TB) - Personal documents, music, videos, client information Drive 3 (1 TB) - Pro Tools Audio only Drive 4 (1 TB) - Video for Pro Tools only (all in DV25 format, using DVCPRO codec) Drive 5 (1 TB) - Sound FX Library (all linked to SoundMiner) I also have ...


2

Gotta add another +1 for Reaper as a sound design tool. The guys that make Reaper are super fast about making big changes and additions to their software for an insanely reasonable price...and they unfortunately go widely overlooked. AND THEY LISTEN TO THEIR USERBASE I used to be a big protools guy, mainly because I used it in school and never really gave ...


2

I think your question is actually very misleading. Some Windows based laptops have far superior sound to Macs, and some are much worse. The thing Macs have is consistency, as Apple has control over the entire hardware, whereas there are a million different Windows laptops. So for your 3 questions: 1 - not better generally, nor worse generally, just more ...


2

I suggest returning the Macbook Air and getting a Macbook with Firewire. USB interfaces will give you latency when monitoring the recording signal, unless you have one that allows for hardware monitoring. (Perhaps someone else can speak about this. My interface is supposed to have this, but I've never used the feature. I also don't know what will work with ...


2

Mac Minis are great for Qlab audio, and are also cheaper than a macbook pro or a macbook air. We have several mac minis at my school theatre (Ithaca College) for just this purpose. If you're looking to do video though, make sure you use something with a discreet graphics card (ie. NOT a macbook air or 13" macbook pro).


2

JBridgeM (for Mac OS X) is out... http://jstuff.wordpress.com/jbridgem/


2

The dB level depends on what you are playing and how far away you are from the speakers. The only way to get an accurate estimate of the SPL is to use a SPL meter.


2

You can do this by selecting from the top menu Edit->Tempo->Show Tempo List, and then click on the + symbol to add a new tempo change. The default starting point will be the location of your time bar, though you can change that and the expected tempo by double clicking on the values that appear listed in the Tempo List window.


2

PlayStation Eye is one of the best and cheap recommendations. It is a microphone array with 4 microphones in row with only 35 dollars. Check amazon


2

What I would advice would be to use a mixing software like Native Instruments - Traktor for mixing tracks together. If you prefer non-live mixing you should definitely learn how to use a software like Ableton - Live. Your setup may vary depending on your needs, but one important thing in a live mix is not recording an audio feedback from your microphone. ...


2

A procedure that would definitely work: for each file ${f}.wav, Split it up to M/S stereo, i.e. to a file ${f}_M.wav and a file ${f}_S.wav. For instance with ffmpeg -i ${f}.wav -filter_complex "[0:0]pan=1c|c0=0.5 * c0 + 0.5 * c1[mid];[0:0]pan=1c|c0 = 0.5 * c0 + -0.5 * c1[side]" -map "[mid]" ${f}_M.wav -map "[side]" ${f}_S.wav If f.wav is actually mono, ...


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