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Behringer UCG102 is one of the cheapest guitar interfaces for PC/MAC. It costs a little over £20 but not that much. However I'd advise against buying the cheapest interface. If you can't afford anything better at the moment, than I suggest to save some money and then buy the better interface. Otherwise after playing for couple of weeks it may turn out that ...


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You really just need the best of everything you can afford - as an extreme example, marrying a dual 6-core Xeon to 2GB RAM & a 64GB 4200 rpm drive would be rather a waste. Very very broadly... CPU clock speed will give you raw power. CPU core count will give you multi-threading; higher plugin count. RAM will give you 'room to breathe' for everything ...


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The right way to do this is open the project in GarageBand and export each track as its own audio file. Then you can import the audio files into a PC-based multichannel audio editor and continue working. Failing that, though, notice that the GarageBand project is a folder, and inside the folder there is a “Media” folder that contains the individual audio ...


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I know I'm a little late here, but I just ran into the same problem and was trying to find a solution. It turns out that I was pumping a stereo signal into a mono input and then listen to the stereo signal mixed from that, which created that 'half' sound. Be careful with the type of cable you're using to split the signal. Some of those 1/4" splitters only ...


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The product you linked is the one for the job. And since you give to your condenser mic the power it needs to operate, you can connect it anywhere you could connect any dynamic mic, such as a simple XLR-USB audio interface.


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The audio processing speed is dependent entirely on the speed of the CPU and RAM in the machine. Storing the DAW software itself on a slow hard drive will not have any effect at all on the processing speed. What will be critical however is where you store the audio that you are working with. Most DAW's will buffer audio to a certain extent, mitigating the ...


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The internal sound card of the computer is most likely the problem. These onboard audio components are very cheaply made, meaning they are not designed to avoid interference from other components and power lines inside the computer and they also don't have the filtering to remove interference once it enters the audio path. Get an external audio interface: ...


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I've made this For about $6 total. It's a simple impedance matcher that allows you to use your own sound card. If you feel like tinkering, you can't really get cheaper than this. The quality is okay-ish, and could certainly be improved by fiddling with the capacitance a bit and adding more shielding. For anything more serious, I'm using a modelling unit; ...


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a. Make the setup work with the new balanced audio cables and restore the fidelity of the audio. You don’t have new balanced audio; you have unbalanced stereo going into a balanced input which does not work and is why the audio sounds horrible and like things are missing. (Because they are.) b. Change the setup in a way that the 1/8" to 2x 1/4" ...


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I replaced the unbalanced cables with 1/8" to 1/4" cables, thinking that would fix it. That's still an unbalanced cable. Your PC output is unbalanced, any cable connected to it will be unbalanced. You could insert a DI between the PC output and the mixer. Use a passive DI or an active DI with a power supply. Experiment with the Ground lift switch. ...


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They do argument, that the OS does not need to run on a fast hard drive That maybe made sense a couple of years ago when SSDs were expensive and small, so you'd use them for the most critical data only. These days, the price difference is small enough to just go for the SSD for everything except archival storage. I have two computers from the same year, ...


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Hey James, What version of PT are you using? When you save copy, are you saving it as 5.1 - 6.9 or earlier? That will shorten character names exceeding 31 characters. And the letters that get dropped aren't random, they are vowels only, so no worries. James


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Try Jingle Palette. It's free. It supports various audio files. And, in my experience of using it, it's very stable.


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The output of the pc is going to be at a voltage level (line level) that is way higher than the phone is expecting (mic level). You need an 'attenuator' between the pc and the phone that will drop the level by between 30dB and 40dB. If you are savvy with electronics, you can build an attenuator with a few resistors.


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Well, apparently there can be a lot of factors: a better signal definition (how small are the bits that count; good chips allow for a true 20bit sound, while a lo-end will struggle hard to achieve even a 15bit resolution — and is likely to fail at that;) how wide is the actual passband of DAC filters; linear and non-linear distortions introduced, the ...


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I would recommend against using an external mixer for EQ in this case. You have a professional quality audio interface with full DSP capability. You can simply apply the desired EQ prior to output without needing to go through a mixer. You will get higher quality and more feature rich EQs than you will be able to get with a cheap mixer. You are literally ...


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I believe the reason your connection is not working is because the way things are connected, the mic1 output doesn't only end up in the mic input of the tablet but also to the mic2 output. Same with the outputs. Ideally what you need is an audio interface with multiple (2x) inputs and outputs. This would allow you to control each level individually but you ...


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There seems to be an mono unbalanced output on the receiver that you can connect to PC/laptop using an mono cable and an adapter however you would yield better quality recordings if using an mixer or external audio interface. Here's the link to the quick start guide: http://cloud.akg.com/8361/1377067421783_23_6.pdf


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Electret condenser microphones will deliver output even without plugin power. Really, really bad, low-gain high-noise output. So you better make sure that the plugin power is actually switched on. Depending on your audio hardware and your operating system, there may be utilities for controlling the plugin power, and of course the simplest way to be sure ...


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ableton has a drag n drop feature that allows you to place a wave or mp3 in a midi track and get kind've interpretation of what the melody and harmony is, though you may have to use your sensibilies to extract the parts you want


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This sounds like an audio to midi converter. By analysing the audio file, you can retrieve pitch and duration information which coincidentally is what you require to generate midi note-on and note-off messages. Something like this?


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First of all, we need to get audio running from your digital piano into the computer. This means you need an interface. Here's a link for a very basic one that's also pretty easy on the wallet: http://www.amazon.ca/Ultra-Low-Latency-Interface-Digital-Output/dp/B000KW2YEI I have the same one which I found at a local music store for around $30 CAD. The ...


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The CD input on most amps doesn't use the pre-amp section or EQ, it's just fed to the last part of the amplification and in to the speaker at maximum volume. What that means is that you'll have to change the volume of the feeding signal from amplitube. So in essence you will be using only the speaker of your bass amp. - Some info, the RCA cables are ...


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I like the idea, but you will want to keep impedance in mind. The thing to remember here is that your bass is outputting an instrument level signal, and your bass amp is designed to handle that signal. When you run the bass through the scarlett though, it is accepting your instrument level signal from the bass, processing through the VST, and being output ...


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The mic100 only has balanced in/outs. If there is some specific reason you want to use this piece of gear then I would suggest you get a DI-Box. It takes a 1/4" unbalanced and gives you a balanced XLR output. The pre-amp is not needed in a functional sense for what you're doing so keep in mind, unless you're trying to get the "sound" of that piece of gear it'...


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EMV is very much correct but there are a number of things you can do to reduce the hum. Make sure all of the audio equipment is on the same circuit to help reduce chance that you are in a ground loop. Add a ferite clip to the analog audio cable. Change the surge protector that you are using. Different pieces of equipment can be more sensitive to cheap ...


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