Hot answers tagged

7

I'm not saying this answers everything but the Fletcher Munson curves give an indication of how our hearing is sensitive to some frequencies and not others. Here is the graph taken from wiki that shows the FM curves and the ISO equal loudness curves for various sound pressure levels: - A small side-note. As the sound intensity drops our ability to hear bass ...


5

I think you've misunderstood what Frequency is, with respect to audio. Whilst 'Frequency' typically is 'how frequently something occurs', in audio it's how many times a sine-wave oscillates in a second, rather than how many things you hear in a second. eg. A standard kick-drum track at 60 BPM means you'll hear a kick-drum sound once-per-second. That actual ...


5

I think you are working to a false premise. It is not actually the sensitivity of the microphone that is they key to this - you can take any half decent mic & keep turning it up. Sure, there will be some noise floor, but this is almost irrelevant. What is different is perception. The human ear is controlled by the human brain. Aside from the fact that ...


5

The simple answer is no. If you make air move, in the audio range of humans, and not too quiet, then there is no duration short enough that it can't be heard. And a millisecond is a very long period of time for the human ear to react to a sound. Your options are: use ultrasound, as you mentioned use very low volume (may or may not work for you) accept ...


5

Amplitude Taken from here: The human ear can consciously discriminate amplitude differences of about 1dB, and experiments show subconscious awareness of amplitude differences under .2dB. Although a complete answer would probably have to account to the equal loudness contours - we may be able to tell a 1dB difference with 1kHz, but not so for 100Hz. ...


4

I used to have a tone sweep from one of the convolution plug ins as my ring tone. It worked really well because it was a chirp, followed by a few seconds of silence, and then a tone sweep low to high. The chirp and pause gave me time to answer it if i was in a room, and the tone sweep cut through when i was in noisy locations. The only caveat is that the ...


2

There are a few things going on here and if you can provide a bit more detail I may be able to offer a better answer. What kind of headphones are you using? What kind of D/A are you using (the headphone jack on your phone/computer or an interface)? Do you experience this with speakers as well? For reference, what are the tracks in question? To address ...


1

I think people have misunderstood that this is a hypothetical question. Anyway, in short, playing two sound sources simultaneously on your computer will add them together (double the power / +3dB, etc). This can be observed by having multiple mono tracks in a DAW, using your computers motherboard output if necessary, muting all tracks and progressively un-...


1

Sound through the air is insanely complex. It is impossible for more than one source (even a "perfect" speaker emitting a pure sine-wave) to actually combine additively with an identical source. And when you get to something as complex as the human voice, even if you had an identically-trained pair of identical twin singers, you could not get them to "add" ...


1

It's simple really; Your speakers can't reproduce a 1Hz sinewave, and if it could, you wouldn't hear it due to the limits of human hearing(plus, due to the size of the speaker cone, it would have very little energy). If your speaker could reproduce a 1Hz sinewave, you would see the speaker cone moving in and out with a one second period. If you were to play ...


1

It may be that the compression is causing you this discomfort. There are certain types of music I cannot listen to as even medium bitrate mp3's as the compression method used does some nasty things to certain frequencies. When a track has a lot of information (ie lots of low end and high end detail) mp3 compression doesn't behave well, so you get odd ...


1

Mute the track you are recording to and make sure to turn off the microphone in windows playback.


1

The tone I've used for years has been a tune that started with a rhythmic high-hat... instantly recognizable once it's locked into your head. With four bars before the melody comes it, it's enough time to mute or answer while the tone is still pretty quiet and unobtrusive. Then another four bars with a mild melody, before finally a bit of lyrics. Has the ...


1

Yes, what you ask for is impossible, it's like wanting to take a swim but not wanting to get wet I'd say. You can get one, but not the other. If you wanna blast away in the car or being in a dense crowd and still hear the phone, there is always the option to fire away a square-tone at full blast in the vicinity around 1 to 3 KHz. But at least in the crowd ...


1

If you think you're hearing is not as good as it should be for your age range, then get checked out by a hearing specialist. To try and maintain your hearing: Limit exposure to loud sounds as much as possible. Calibrate your monitor system to a sane level. When working, monitor at low levels as much as possible. Wear earplugs in loud environments (...


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