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7

I had it explained to me this way once by someone with way more experience mixing and editing dialog than me: "When having a conversation with someone, are you normally standing 3-5 feet away from them? Or are you right next to them pressing your ear against their ribcage when they talk to you? Because that is the sound that a lav usually captures." A ...


3

Wireless is the way to go. Try feeding the boom op what's coming out of the mains via a Comtek feed. Have your boom op transmit via a Lectro setup. That way the boom up is fully unrestrained by cable tethers. I boom op'd on a feature a long time ago and the mixer preferring working this way - it was fantastic, freedom for both the mixer and boom op to be ...


3

Both mics are important. A boom microphone sounds more natural than a lavalier microphone which is (should be!) very close to the body. The thing is, the louder the background is, the more background-noise level you'll have on the boom. So it's a compromise every time: Do you take the more natural signal but you have all the background on it, or do you take ...


2

I'm a boom and i absolutely hate comteks!! Terrible terrible sound....I've been using the sennheiser EK 2000 and like it much better! Longer range and much better sound. If we don't have a wireless transmitter for the boom mic, i prefer using a duplex cable, and have the monitoring trough the cable as well.


2

Rifle or shot gun microphones are a must in all applications but the advent of lepal or lav microphones have really helped in situations ,for example an extreme wide or wide shot and at the end of the day you just can not get that boom in there that Lapel is helping to pick up that dialogue even if its a guide track its a pretty good decent guide track which ...


2

When both persons speaking are visible I memorize the lines while the actors practice (having a script at hand might be helpful) and pan the mic between both. If the scene is split into shot/ reverse shot, I also try to get both but my priority lies on the person on-screen. Especialy when the boom operator isn't experienced, too much panning might overburden ...


2

Do you memorize the dialogue and aim the microphone back and forth between the two people when their lines come up? yes This allow you to anticipate one's sentences ending and be on place for beginning of next character's sentence. Notice that it's important that your microphone is aimed at the person speaking. Which means your microphone can be between ...


1

I have had experience with the rain jammer by rycote and found it to be an amazing addition to your kit. I am not affiliated with rycote but do like their products. http://store.locationsoundcrew.com/en/remote-audio/127-remote-audio-rainman-boom-mic-rain-cover-for-zepplin-rycote-kit-4.html Gets kinda heavy under rain machines but your mic is completely ...


1

I've no experiencewith this, and am not affiliated with rycote: http://www.rycote.com/products/rycote_duck_rain_cover/ You could probably rent it to check the usage and protection value. Good luck


1

You can always buy your own insurance for liability and/or equipment, but most production companies have their own insurance that will cover you.


1

I can't afford a Comtek feed yet, but wireless feed with Sennheiser G3s works a treat in the meantime.


1

Boom or lav, that is the question? Justin and Guido have covered this topic well - so it really comes down to the framed shot, location, and post budget to dictate what you use. I am a documentary sound op and my lavs rarely leave my kit. When I’m recording in locations that are ambient specific, the soundscape is as important as the dialogue. Shotguns are ...


1

I use the mkh70 in very reverberant indoor spaces with great results. Only challenge is its size if the ceilings are low as you will have difficulty physically fitting it above their head. For general purpose indoor dialog go with the schoeps cmc6 with an mk41 capsule. Gold standard for indoor dialog recordings. If the price is an issue you can find the ...


1

Contrary to most here apparently, I find in reality I am often feeding a little bit of lav mic into the boom track to boost a word or sentence which is slightly off mic, or using some frequencies of the lav mic to give more presence to the boom perhaps in a wide shot where the boom is not placed ideally, or using the lav mic as a main mic and using the boom ...


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