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7

I had it explained to me this way once by someone with way more experience mixing and editing dialog than me: "When having a conversation with someone, are you normally standing 3-5 feet away from them? Or are you right next to them pressing your ear against their ribcage when they talk to you? Because that is the sound that a lav usually captures." A ...


5

I'm not sure I understand if you mean fix it in post or on set... If it's in post: I'd start by setting the levels so that they match somewhat. If the BG noise is too high in one scene I'd try and de-noise it. If the de-noising don't sound good, just forget about it and try to cut around it. Setting the levels and using EQ to match the previous clip can ...


4

Erik makes a very good point. More and more, mixers schedules don't permit to be choosing between sides. As an editor you should be confident in your tracks to just choose your best sounding side and go with it. However... There are situations that require boom and lav to make it even acceptable without looping. (Or typically getting it the best it can ...


4

You cant... So either you spend a lot of time trying your very best to make the phase perfect, to then realize that the mixer promptly chooses the best mic for the job and mutes the other (or uses it pretty low as a room mic). Phase issues sound VERY different in a near field monitoring than it will on a dub stage. So choose your sounds/mics wisely. Well, ...


3

Wireless is the way to go. Try feeding the boom op what's coming out of the mains via a Comtek feed. Have your boom op transmit via a Lectro setup. That way the boom up is fully unrestrained by cable tethers. I boom op'd on a feature a long time ago and the mixer preferring working this way - it was fantastic, freedom for both the mixer and boom op to be ...


3

Both mics are important. A boom microphone sounds more natural than a lavalier microphone which is (should be!) very close to the body. The thing is, the louder the background is, the more background-noise level you'll have on the boom. So it's a compromise every time: Do you take the more natural signal but you have all the background on it, or do you take ...


3

If it were me, I would have asked the director: "Why isn't the lighting the exact same on the beach as it is in the hallway? Why didn't you place the key light in the exact same spot and have the same exact exposure and backlight as you had from the sun on the beach than the florescent light in the hallway? Lighting guys I know would have lit the scene to ...


3

.One extra thing apart of the already mentioned above. As sound dudes we are very aware (much more than mortals) about the sound quality of our recordings. To add consistency to your recordings a trick is mach your best (cleanest/driest) recordings to your crappiest one (after you have done everything you can to improve this bad recording) People tend to ...


2

If you keep your radio mic in a similar area all the time (which can be difficult with wardrobe changes, but that's part of the challenge!), that should be consistent and not contain too much noise. A big thing to watch out for though, is clothing rustle. Booming is a trickier proposition. You want push that thing so far into frame that the camera op starts ...


2

As a side note. I have been known to add crap to sell less than stellar performed ADR. Example several shots of couple walking and talking. Down stairways corridors etc. Lavs unusable. Added reverb (of course) and fake lav noise rustling. As viewers we have been used to hearing lavs ins scenes like his and the added rustle really sold it. Without it it was ...


2

One simpler method of doing fine phase adjustment such as Tyler describes might be to use a phase adjustment plugin such as Radix's Auto-Alignment plugin. Haven't had a chance to test it out yet but worth a go perhaps? (I think Voxengo do one too)


2

Firstly, directors get a kick out of running the sound guys down unless, of course, they're doing it for free. Secondly, if you can close your eyes and still get a reasonable idea of the location just from listening, then the sound is good. Only reduce location noise when it detracts from the focal point of the recording. Even then, don't overdo it - just ...


2

When both persons speaking are visible I memorize the lines while the actors practice (having a script at hand might be helpful) and pan the mic between both. If the scene is split into shot/ reverse shot, I also try to get both but my priority lies on the person on-screen. Especialy when the boom operator isn't experienced, too much panning might overburden ...


2

Do you memorize the dialogue and aim the microphone back and forth between the two people when their lines come up? yes This allow you to anticipate one's sentences ending and be on place for beginning of next character's sentence. Notice that it's important that your microphone is aimed at the person speaking. Which means your microphone can be between ...


2

Rifle or shot gun microphones are a must in all applications but the advent of lepal or lav microphones have really helped in situations ,for example an extreme wide or wide shot and at the end of the day you just can not get that boom in there that Lapel is helping to pick up that dialogue even if its a guide track its a pretty good decent guide track which ...


2

I'm a boom and i absolutely hate comteks!! Terrible terrible sound....I've been using the sennheiser EK 2000 and like it much better! Longer range and much better sound. If we don't have a wireless transmitter for the boom mic, i prefer using a duplex cable, and have the monitoring trough the cable as well.


1

I can't afford a Comtek feed yet, but wireless feed with Sennheiser G3s works a treat in the meantime.


1

I have had experience with the rain jammer by rycote and found it to be an amazing addition to your kit. I am not affiliated with rycote but do like their products. http://store.locationsoundcrew.com/en/remote-audio/127-remote-audio-rainman-boom-mic-rain-cover-for-zepplin-rycote-kit-4.html Gets kinda heavy under rain machines but your mic is completely ...


1

I've no experiencewith this, and am not affiliated with rycote: http://www.rycote.com/products/rycote_duck_rain_cover/ You could probably rent it to check the usage and protection value. Good luck


1

You can always buy your own insurance for liability and/or equipment, but most production companies have their own insurance that will cover you.


1

Boom or lav, that is the question? Justin and Guido have covered this topic well - so it really comes down to the framed shot, location, and post budget to dictate what you use. I am a documentary sound op and my lavs rarely leave my kit. When I’m recording in locations that are ambient specific, the soundscape is as important as the dialogue. Shotguns are ...


1

I use the mkh70 in very reverberant indoor spaces with great results. Only challenge is its size if the ceilings are low as you will have difficulty physically fitting it above their head. For general purpose indoor dialog go with the schoeps cmc6 with an mk41 capsule. Gold standard for indoor dialog recordings. If the price is an issue you can find the ...


1

Hi Stringer, I would use the mkh60 for outdoor scenes. The 70 is maybe a bit overkill, it ofcourse depends on how close you can get to your actor(s) and weather conditions. If you're already using the 418 then the 60 is a nice match, since to sound a like. The 418 is a bit noisier then the 60 but still sounds good. Other well used mic's are the schoeps ...


1

As far as my experience goes, if you are doing location sound for a project,a proper recce has to be done to find out whether location sound is possible for the given script and location.I have seen some directors doing location sound thinking that ADR is expensive.What they really don't know is that, sync sound can be tougher and expensive. Given your ...


1

Studio 1's Mic Boom Poles (also know as a fishpole) are built using strong, but lightweight aerospace aluminum making them affordable for videographers, news crews and filmmakers.


1

Contrary to most here apparently, I find in reality I am often feeding a little bit of lav mic into the boom track to boost a word or sentence which is slightly off mic, or using some frequencies of the lav mic to give more presence to the boom perhaps in a wide shot where the boom is not placed ideally, or using the lav mic as a main mic and using the boom ...


1

In my opinion you can't combine boom and lav in the same scene at all, it's a HUGE difference in character between 'em. The lavs have a much more "flat" sound, and where you might very well match up two different boom-mics to appear consistent by filtering, you can't really do that between lav and boom as the change in flatness and liveliness gets very ...


1

Generally speaking, if I'm doing the dialog editing and I have both tracks, I listen to both of them individually. Then I'll pick the best one and mute the other one. Most of the time the boom mic wins, but there are cases where the lav comes out better. I wouldn't really try to mix both of them together simultaneously. Think of it as a primary and an ...


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