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7

I had it explained to me this way once by someone with way more experience mixing and editing dialog than me: "When having a conversation with someone, are you normally standing 3-5 feet away from them? Or are you right next to them pressing your ear against their ribcage when they talk to you? Because that is the sound that a lav usually captures." A ...


3

Both mics are important. A boom microphone sounds more natural than a lavalier microphone which is (should be!) very close to the body. The thing is, the louder the background is, the more background-noise level you'll have on the boom. So it's a compromise every time: Do you take the more natural signal but you have all the background on it, or do you take ...


2

Rifle or shot gun microphones are a must in all applications but the advent of lepal or lav microphones have really helped in situations ,for example an extreme wide or wide shot and at the end of the day you just can not get that boom in there that Lapel is helping to pick up that dialogue even if its a guide track its a pretty good decent guide track which ...


2

Well, the obvious way to tackle pop / rumble is a hefty low cut. On spoken voice, you can usually do away with everything below 120 Hz, sometimes even higher (up to 500 Hz may be suitable in some rooms). Add a shelving filter to take away some of the low mids a bit more gently. The danger is that you end up with a thin “telephone-like” sound. ...


2

The main issue when speaker B spills on speaker A microphone (be it a lapel or not) is the relative level between A and B on A's mic. By reducing the sensitivity of the transmitter, you are not changing this ratio, you are probably just under modulating the radio link (which is not good!). Don't reduce transmitter sensitivity to solve a spilling issue. ...


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It depends how close you are to each other but yes the closer the microphone is to the source the lower the gain has to be to pick up the sound.


1

You have a few different options. You can use some gates on the lapel mics and set the threshold high enough to cut the TV bleedover, but not the character dialogue. This has the downside of potentially sounding unnatural, and you'll have to tune the attack and decay of the gates to get the speech to not sound choppy as it cuts in and out. If the TV sound ...


1

If you record dialog in the field, the audio you record should be clean, and flawless, and the dialog crisp and intelligible, under all possible conditions, including the vacuum of space. No, it isn't easy to uphold this ideal. But it is the demarcation between sound captured by a professional, vs. a non-professional. In my book, which is a bit different ...


1

Izotope denoise can help but I've had better luck with the declick or decrackle modules, depending on the length, spectral repair can be even better but takes more time. Cloth rustle can appear in many different forms and vary a lot depending on where the mic was placed and type of cloth.


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Sounds like a job for iZotope RX. Using denoise with an isolated cloth rustle as a noiseprint to learn you might be able to lower the cloth sounds but I doubt you would be able to remove them entirely without affecting the voice dramatically.


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Chris, what happens when you move the mic another button down?


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I second Jesse's comment. The octave above the fundamental, which usually sits between 200-300 Hz is the 'box' frequency that presents so many problems. This simple roll off + Notch should fix the problem. If this is still not working then first of all check the mic is working properly (perhaps swap the mics around the presenters) and if all else fails try ...


1

Hey Chris, have you tried notching the 2nd or 3rd harmonic in the presenter's voice? I sometimes find that this creates more boomy-ness than the actual fundamental frequency. You can search for it using a boost with a high Q setting or use an EQ with a spectral analyzer such as Fabfilter Pro-Q. Also try hunting for some vocal clarity just below 2k and giving ...


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Boom or lav, that is the question? Justin and Guido have covered this topic well - so it really comes down to the framed shot, location, and post budget to dictate what you use. I am a documentary sound op and my lavs rarely leave my kit. When I’m recording in locations that are ambient specific, the soundscape is as important as the dialogue. Shotguns are ...


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Historically radio transmission has been moving up in the frequency spectrum VHF = very high frequency UHF = ultra high frequency you may expect better quality and lower power requirements (higher battery life) from UHF, but the experts say the benefit is usually less battle for channels and smaller antennae. Familiarise yourself with the legalities of ...


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