0

Ok so, in order to get a Masters degree I have to pass a grad review, in which I flunked once. I have second Graduate review scheduled in Aug and I want to clear it this time for sure. In the first review test, my professor, asked me many questions looking at my pro tools session. I could answer few question. The first question was, what is your job on this, I was bit stuck, and failed to explain him. I request you all to sort what exactly is my job description upon my interest.

So my interest in whole audio is, I very much like to put the sound effects for films, animations from the sound libraries and also add some music to it. (I don't Compose music)

so while working on pro tools for this kind of work, what would be the job description for this and also please give some resources where I can get more familiar for the same.

Please help me.. Thank you so much.

3

In my opinion, your role is defined not only by what you do for a project but by who you work/interact with and with what authority. So a few options:

  • Are you the only "sound person" on your project? Do you interface with the director yourself? Will you be the one in charge of signing off on the final audio product before it is shown/submitted to the director for approval? In this case, you would be the "sound designer", a title which basically indicates that you control all-things sound for the project. Sometimes this is interchanged with "supervising sound editor", but that to me indicates that you have others on a team for you to supervise...
  • If you do work on a sound team, are you the leader? In that case you can call yourself the "supervising sound editor". If you work under a team leader, call yourself a "sound editor".
  • If your job also includes mixing all of the elements (Dialog, SFX, and music) together for the final mix, you should tag on "re-recording mixer" to your title.

This is a very formal set of titles for what is, perhaps, a less formal workflow, and you certainly don't want or need to credit yourself as the "supervising-re-recording-sound-designer-editor" if you did all the work yourself. It's definitely good to understand which of the roles your work falls under, though. It helps me gauge my progress in a design and manage my time. Check out THIS link for more info on roles in film.

Hope this helps!
Best,
~Matt

| improve this answer | |
0

Hi there, sounds like you were doing the job of a Sound Designer.

| improve this answer | |
  • Or Sound Editor depending on what one considers appropriate. Or an Audiographer as a less known designation. – Internet Human Jul 1 '13 at 2:04
  • Or tracklayer might also be appropriate! – Fred Pearson Jul 1 '13 at 5:26
  • I would second Sound Editor. You specifically mention placing sounds in from a library, if you're not going to be designing sounds from scratch and don't do manipulation and conjuring of those sounds, I would say it's Sound Editor. – Dave Jul 1 '13 at 18:15
  • @Dave Lets not start this. There's already: socialsounddesign.com/questions/14687/… : "The next time you hear someone refer to sound editors as someone who "Just pulls from the library to cover stuff" tell them that they are full of crap and speaking from inexperience." -Chris Assells – Internet Human Jul 1 '13 at 19:12
  • HAHAHA! Don't take me out of context. There's an explanation that goes along with that rather incendiary quote. Like everybody in the industry this guy can call himself whatever the hell he wants. – Chris Assells Jul 4 '13 at 1:36
0

Can I get more detailed answer please? The answer should be very specific, related to the job what Iam doing in a pro tools sessions. Please Please Please. Thank you

| improve this answer | |
  • You're editing audio and you're creating (or helping to create as a part of a team) a soundtrack for a piece of media by doing that. – Internet Human Jul 1 '13 at 9:57
0

Hi,

I am in the very same shoe. I think the job title is Sound Designer as mentioned above. If you create the sounds in a recording studio you can call yourself a Foley artist.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.