Hot answers tagged

9

If you use a new crappy cable, it's going to sound worse than a well-made and cared for high-quality cable that's 10 years old. But by the same token, a well-used workhorse cable that's been cared for properly for 10 years might not sound as good as something studio-grade. Age really has nothing to do with it. Quality, construction, and care are what ...


7

It's a modular system. You need the microphone module, which you have, and the power module, which you apparently don't have. According to Sennheiser documentation you need the K6 or K6P power module. http://en-us.sennheiser.com/directional-microphone-shotgun-film-broadcast-me-66


6

XLR typically gives you a 'balanced' connection, whereas the Jack connection is unbalanced. An unbalanced connection is very susceptible to electromagnetic interference - the mains hum you get from a guitar plugged into an amp, for example. For a high signal level instrument, like a guitar, this is often not a problem, but for a low level signal like a ...


6

Fred42Vid's answer is good (though the 1/4" jack is probably a balanced TRS). I wanted to add something, though; on a mixer, when you have both a TRS and an XLR, they sometimes have subtly different signal paths. Specifically, the microphone input is often run through a second op-amp to boost its signal by about 20dBu before the main gain stage (controllable ...


5

It would be very unusual for equipment to put phantom power out to TRS inputs. One reason is that connecting an unbalanced TS connector would shorten one line with phantom power but not the other, resulting in a high bias voltage for whatever equipment. Another is that TRS sockets are forming connections almost nilly-willy when plugging in which makes them ...


4

It sounds like there was a manufacturing problem with the mic to be honest. Return it to the Guitar Centre and explain/demonstrate the difficulty you are having with the xlr connector. I'm sure they will offer you a replacement/refund since they've sold you a microphone which doesn't actually fully connect to a standard xlr.


3

Yes it is just fine to connect and disconnect mics from your H5. If you are recording or monitoring the inputs you will likely hear a pop or click.


3

If the mic uses phantom power, be sure to turn off the phantom on the H5 before connecting/ disconnecting. It's ok to have the H5 switched on otherwise.


3

Yes, they do wear out eventually. As pointed out already, the life time depends greatly on use and quality. Even with a cable that seemingly works sound quality may get drastically reduced. See below. The type of defects you will start to see over time, can be categorized into three main areas: mechanical damage corrosion dry out/cracking Mechanical ...


3

A really good way of waterproofing XLR connectors outdoor are these casings made by Stanley for outdoor power socket connectors: http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-39387-Protect-Protection-Connector/dp/B0036DEC0W/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1360791701&sr=8-2&keywords=cable+connector+protector+outdoor+garden They fit XLR connectors well, and have used ...


3

XLR connector pros compared to jacks/TRS connectors: It is not as easily pulled out (it locks when connected). It is thicker; thus more rugged The physical interface is larger (pins into tubes), thus better electrical connection. The physical construction makes it much harder to cause disconnection failures due to pulling and pushing. The signal ground is ...


3

You just use two balanced audio cables with XLR on the speaker side and 1/4-inch on the audio interface side. That is a very standard pro audio cable.


3

Yes, microphones like the AT899 give you the option of using internal battery power OR phantom power (from the XLR). Yes, microphones like the Rode Lav require phantom power without the option. Yes, the more phantom power is sucked out of your Zoom H6, the faster it drains the available battery power. You are almost always better off running equipment ...


2

Two decent options are 1) using waterproof Neutrik connectors (pricey and requires custom cable making) and 2) use of silicone tape. Called 100mph tape in the military, it adheres only to itself. You make a single, narrow, very tight wrap around the mating point of the cables, and a wider secondary wrap over that. Stuff's neither cheap nor re-usable but is ...


2

You can get adapters for this, but the sound will be much better if you get a sound card that has the TRS outputs, or if you use an external breakout box (USB or Firewire, USB on most PCs.)


2

You shouldn't have an issue with one split off of a mic. You should probably use the battery power option on the NTG2 , just to keep things simple. In general, this method will probably work better with a set of higher input impedance pre-amps. That's just a general observation, as I don't know what the input impedance on the H4n is off the top of my head. ...


2

It depends on what features the 1/4 inch supports, but at best it would tie the XLR. Most likely, the XLR is the better option. XLR cables are balanced, which greatly reduces the amount of noise they pick up. 1/4 inch cables can support a TRS mode that uses a balanced signal, but often (most of the time) for guitar cables, they do not. It is possible in ...


2

In addition to Rory's answer, it is also important to remember that XLR is a locking connector (though the lock isn't always utilized) where as 1/4" (the more common term for what I assume is being referred to as JACK) is a non-locking connector. It is susceptible to accidentally being pulled out. It also has some inconsistency in application. 1/4" cables ...


2

I don't have enough rep to comment, so I'll answer as best I can. First, I think the biggest thing you're going to need to deal with is the room in which the meeting takes place and the arrangement of the people speaking, physically, within that room. If the meeting can take place in a room that's relatively small, has some thick carpet on the floor and ...


2

Normally the phantom power would only be present in the XLR inputs of the interface. For example, the Focusrite Scarlett, a very wide spread model in the market that has combined XLR and TRS connectors, clearly states in the user manual: 48V phantom power switch for mic inputs - enables 48 V phantom power at XLR contacts of both Combo connectors. Note ...


2

The splitter cable you're using combines the 2 stereo inputs into the 3 pin XLR connector, putting the left channel in pin 2 and the right in pin 3, or the other way around. You can only use that type of connection with a system that specifically uses XLR type connectors for stereo signals. That's not the case with normal performance and PA devices, where ...


2

Actually, the mic pre amp you are mentioning is a pre amp plus a processing chain (a dynamics processor and some filters and eqs). You cannot emulate the pre amp itself in software as amplifying the mic signal is inherently done in the analog domain. The cost of a mic pre amp is related to the analog components included, their selection and association to ...


2

I'm in full agreement with audionuma's answer, but just to add that a 3 grand mic preamp will not fix a 10 buck microphone. As you didn't mention in your question what mic & preamps you currently have, this is a bit of guesswork, but assuming it's a fairly basic setup, you can gain a reasonable amount of sound quality by using a USB pre-amp - they ...


2

3-pin is usually for balanced mono lines - a single balanced mic, etc. 4-pin can carry a mono signal to a headset & a mono unbalanced mic return. 5-pin can carry stereo to a headset & a mono unbalanced mic return. 6-pin can carry stereo to a headset & a mono balanced mic return. If you try to reduce a 5 or 6 pin setup to run over 3-pin, ...


2

The microphone signal level will typically not be strong enough to produce acceptable quality at the AUX (line level) input. You need a pre-amplifier to convert the signal from one to the other. Most mixers have one or more; you can also use a standalone pre-amp, and some of them can run on batteries. There are also microphones with built-in pre-amps, but ...


2

You cannot connect a USB microphone to an XLR port. The signal from the USB connector is simply a data-stream whereas the XLR port requires an analogue signal input. What you are proposing cannot be achieved. You have the wrong type of microphone. Any attempt to connect one to the other may damage the microphone. Do not attempt this.


1

It will most probably work fine. The only difference would likely be the impedance, pro level equipment typically having higher impedance (200-600 Ω) than consumer products (< 100 Ω). All this means is that a consumer device may be easier to drive (higher volume in headphones) and that the microphone may put out a stronger signal. This all depends on the ...


1

According to the service manual (available on the AKG website) the phantom power is 3.9v and is connected to pin 3, so the microphone connector should have pins 2 and 3 shorted. If I understand this correctly, the included cable won't have this short and will only connect pin 1 (ground) and pin 2 (signal) so there shouldn't be any risk. I have used the PT 40 ...


1

With a condenser microphone the 48-volt DC is applied to both audio lines, so it cancels out because the signal is sent as a difference between those two lines. With a headset jack the signal for each speaker is sent as the offset between a conductor and the ground line -- this is the same circuit as that used for delivering the phantom power. As a result ...


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