5

I've seen people use Live in so many different ways. That's one of my favourite things about it, it allows you approach things in new ways. I used to use session view mainly when I started out with it, but these days I use the arrangement window more. It really depends on what I'm trying to achieve. I've found the session view useful for a number of things, ...


3

When working on documentary's, I like all of the interview dialogue staggered across 6-10 Dialogue tracks. I'll add a few extra b-roll tracks for footage containing dialogue happening under an interview. The interview / b-roll with any dialogue is printed into my Dialogue Stem. I create a few Production FX tracks for any b-roll or nat sound without dialogue....


3

"i'm afraid i could confuse a low amplitude region with an empty one" Hiya, if you delete the "Audio Files" folder after spotting all offline clips will be greyed out. The recordings have a colour, so you will easily be able to tell what's a spot clip and what's a recording.


2

We did a whole tonebenders episode on this topic with Paul Virostek. I personally edit what I need, backup the originals and then never think of them again. Dustin keeps all of it and I have no idea how he goes back through the source recordings. I find soundminer to be a huge asset for this kind of thing, because it lets me tag the files as I see fit and ...


2

My signal flow varies, but i follow this flow for most large mixes, it not only makes it digestible to combine 100's of sounds into a few minutes, but it saves cpu power. audio track > it's stem (aux) > stem master fader > stem track > (print this, and disable all above tracks, you can go back to the later if need be) printed stems stem track* > Master ...


2

Using an aux track would require you to re-route the audio of each track involved into the aux, and recording automation on the aux track wouldn't affect the automation of the sub-tracks. The VCA is purely a control- and automation-based system, meaning 2 things: Assigning tracks to a VCA has no bering whatsoever on their audio input/output routing. In pro ...


2

I'd be more inclined to remove the white noise from the speech than try add it back in the silence. There are some very good paid plugins that can do it - personally I use a lot of the Waves plugs, X-Noise etc - but there are freeware alternatives. Noise Reduction is one that Google turned up. Untested but for free you can try it & see if it's any good ...


2

I do this all the time. Position the playhead at a convenient/natural point between songs, select all the regions, and "Split Region(s)". At this point you will have a "song" and "the rest of the audio". Place a marker on the first set of regions. Make the song work. When you are satisfied create a new "Alternative" and move to the next song (position ...


2

If it is all one band doing one contiguous concert, I wouldn’t want to break that up into 16 projects, because you will likely want to treat each channel in basically the same way. It likely really is just one drum recording, one guitar recording, and so on, even though it is many songs. If you split it up, the things you do to the drum track, you might have ...


2

First of all it requires 'Experience' ! Second of all take some break and listen to the stuff after a day or two and use different kind of headphones to judge your sound design. Also sitting not too close to the monitors helps a lot. But still you have to listen to people's opinions, we often miss things here and there or we just over do.


2

What is best to do if you record something specific is also record the room 'silent', so than you get the environment sound of the subject your recording. Add these layers together and you'll get your 'white noise' in a less artificial way.


2

The Session View makes most sense when you are using a dedicated controller like the Push in order to trigger scenes. Check out to see someone using a Push controller to build up individual clips, arrange them in scenes, and then play through the scenes.


1

The whole idea with noise is that it is random sound. You can't really easily produce a noise that replicates what was there, so your best bet is to actually use the noise that was present or apply noise reduction to reduce the noise level (if you can get satisfactory results). As Yadli mentioned, if you have a quiet part, you can sample the noise from ...


1

I think the easiest at least from more of a video based standpoint is to have a meeting and have each person concentrate on a certain aspect of the sound design. Maybe 1 person could do the more natural sounds and another the more designed sounds. You can probably share mixdowns everyday (or as often as makes sense) If you have worked together and know ...


1

A/B is also called checkerboarding. You can use it for when a scene changes or anytime you need to apply processing that is radically different than the section of audio that came right before it. It can be used in other ways as well, such as if room tones aren't matching between shots and long fades are needed. I'm sure you already lay out tracks like ...


1

If the original track contains a section of just the noise, you can make a loop with that and keep it playing in your new track when you mute the original one. If not, you'll have to do some filtering to extract a noise loop. Personally I don't think it's a good idea to generate white noise from scratch to mimic the original. It sounds different.


1

heres is the solution! thats what i wanted. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sound-report-writer/id492004803?mt=8


1

I don't know if this is what you really looking for, but Sound Devices made app for I-phone "CL WIFI" in witch you can make sound report, and manage your metadata. But like I said it's for Sound Devices


1

Here are some solutions: Virtual Audio Interface This would be your best option. For OSX you have soundflower* for Windows you have Jack Audio* both are free :) You route the audio from your DAW into the virtual audio interface and than choose the virtual audio interface as an audio input in Team Wiever or Skype. Online DAW: If you don't have to use ...


1

I would suggest setting the grid to show time instead of measures. You can also set the tempo to 60 bpm so that it aligns with seconds, and maybe change the time signature to 10/4, or whatever amount of seconds you may want in another circumstance. By changing the time signature you can customize the grid so that it will fit the regularity of your samples, ...


1

I suggest a spotting session with the client before you cut anything. Sit down and go through the material with pen and paper in hand. Other than that, clients really do change their mind a lot. Having no supervising sound editor is not unusual in low budget features. But in your case if the bureaucracy is keeping you from getting in touch directly with the ...


1

I have a "to edit" folder on my hd where i copy all raw files if i don´t have the time to edit them right away, which is the common situation. When i find the time, i edit the single sounds, clean them up with RX, change gain(if needed) and write metadata into them (twisted wave). After that i rename them and save them into the dedicated folders and import ...


1

I know, this is an old post, but in case new user found this, here are some tips every soundminer user should know: Creating a clearly arranged database structure for your sounds. Create a database for a: all sound currently in use, b: all purchased libraries, c: all your own sounds, d: all production music - find a logic which works for you. We recommend ...


1

This is an area I'm also keen on exploring, particularly with respect to synthesizer-based sound design. Most traditional controllers are performance interfaces, rather than interfaces for the actual design of sounds. Clearly design and performance are linked as any sound that is designed is going to require performance at some point, even if this is only ...


1

My design controllers lately have been: My midi keyboard controlling Structure, a sampler plug-in My Wacom tablet (as a mouse) to control the x/y parameters of GRM Tools I've found this setup very useful (and fun) to perform motors, vehicles, whooshes/swishes, vocal processing, weapon movement, and such.


1

I do use physical controllers for designing sounds. I use Pro Tools for my work environment, and Pro Tools is very bad at allowing out of the ordinary controllers to interact in meaningful ways with the main DAW features. A MIDI controller, usually a keyboard, is good for controlling plug-in instruments like a sampler for great expressive use of pressure, ...


1

I have turned down projects in the past but I now very rarely do that (unless it's a project not worth doing, that is). I've found that it's much better to have a couple of sound editors that you can trust to ship on extra workloads too, if necessary. Plus, it's often great experience for younger sound guys. They do the groundwork and I can qc and final mix ...


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