6

I heart soundminer. My general sm workflows: create an "import" database that you use for tagging sounds with metadata before adding them to your libraries. Quarantining new sounds and manipulating them outside of your massive databases is quicker and cleaner than putting them into your big database and adding metadata there. The reason is because ...


6

Noise Reduction always makes things sound different, not necessarily better. Not everything needs to be pristine.


5

how about: don't use bright mics on bright sources also, headphone gain affects an actor's read. edited to add: don't eq things when they're soloed out - eq relies on context


5

I've seen people use Live in so many different ways. That's one of my favourite things about it, it allows you approach things in new ways. I used to use session view mainly when I started out with it, but these days I use the arrangement window more. It really depends on what I'm trying to achieve. I've found the session view useful for a number of things, ...


4

A gem from Randy Thom: An omnidirectional mic placed close enough to a sound source becomes effectively directional. It's all about S:N! :-)


4

When designing a layered effect, mute layers/regions once in a while- What can't be heard/felt is only clogging up your signal path Low frequency energy adds up really quickly


4

Spend more time watching the video and less time with your eyes glued to Pro Tools. This is something I try to keep in mind because it can be so easy to get sucked into the computer screen. Automation Preview mode is also a god send.


3

The way i work usually is that i open the OMF in a new session based on the template in pro tools. I separate and clean the OMF like sending all you sfx to your template sfx tracks or taking two mono tracks of the same thing and putting them on a stereo track etc... Afterwards i delete all unused tracks and i do a "save copy in" and rename the project ...


3

"i'm afraid i could confuse a low amplitude region with an empty one" Hiya, if you delete the "Audio Files" folder after spotting all offline clips will be greyed out. The recordings have a colour, so you will easily be able to tell what's a spot clip and what's a recording.


3

Good question, I'm interested to hear how others chime in on this. First off, I almost always have a build session and a stem session. The build is what I edit/create in, the stem is what I deliver to the stage for mix (a tidied-up build session). I'll talk with the super/mixer before I deliver in order to know just how much unwinding he/she would like to ...


3

I think you need to look at the universe of possible solutions, try some of them out, and observe how they impact your work. Then decide which solution is the most effective solution for you. Some possibilities for you to try: Create a giant project with all your samples and all your FX chains. Does this get unwieldy? Is it easy to find your way around? ...


3

When working on documentary's, I like all of the interview dialogue staggered across 6-10 Dialogue tracks. I'll add a few extra b-roll tracks for footage containing dialogue happening under an interview. The interview / b-roll with any dialogue is printed into my Dialogue Stem. I create a few Production FX tracks for any b-roll or nat sound without dialogue....


2

I think that nowadays, what it really comes down to is communicating with the supervisor and the mixer. With digital workflows, it seems that there's no hard-and-fast answer for almost ANYTHING any longer. Having experienced both receiving tracks that were somewhat of a PITA on the stage, as well as delivering those, I've realized that really what it comes ...


2

My signal flow varies, but i follow this flow for most large mixes, it not only makes it digestible to combine 100's of sounds into a few minutes, but it saves cpu power. audio track > it's stem (aux) > stem master fader > stem track > (print this, and disable all above tracks, you can go back to the later if need be) printed stems stem track* > Master ...


2

I will second Ryan in his assertion that post-processing is saved for later. Anything you can fix with an edit is better served with that edit than with noise reduction. It doesn't matter how good the algorithms and processors are, noise-reduction will affect the parts you want to keep as well. Experience helps you figure out when you're reaching that point ...


2

I am studying sound design, so there is not much I can say, but the thing that came to me like some kind of angel from the heavens was when i found out about the elastic audio, while editing the dialogue for my second project. During the first one I would ask my ADR friends to start over and over again in order to synch the speech with the picture... and ...


2

So you open a pre built template first and then import the omf. That's the way I would do it but I have seen a few on line tutorials open the omf first and then import the template. I was just wondering is there any advantage in doing it that way.


2

"What do you expect from the picture editor?" At the mix I always expect, "Can we hear what's in my OMF? I like what WE did."


2

Rather than focus on your source sounds, think about how any sound can fit within a mix. Some people spend hours trawling through sample packs when they could of used 100's of sounds they passed. THe trick is making the dynamics and frequencies sit between everything else. Relativity baby...


2

There is no difference between both, it's just a way of working. I do both.


2

Using an aux track would require you to re-route the audio of each track involved into the aux, and recording automation on the aux track wouldn't affect the automation of the sub-tracks. The VCA is purely a control- and automation-based system, meaning 2 things: Assigning tracks to a VCA has no bering whatsoever on their audio input/output routing. In pro ...


2

We did a whole tonebenders episode on this topic with Paul Virostek. I personally edit what I need, backup the originals and then never think of them again. Dustin keeps all of it and I have no idea how he goes back through the source recordings. I find soundminer to be a huge asset for this kind of thing, because it lets me tag the files as I see fit and ...


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