6

The CME UF-series keyboards support a built-in MIDI-over-wireless system. My first guess was the Rockband wireless keyboard. Unfortunately, it doesn't appear to transmit MIDI data over its bluetooth connection. If you are up for a DIY project, here are some instructions on building a wireless MIDI link using XBee radios. Should be able to fit inside the ...


5

The biggest thing is going to be careful EQing and using microphones as close to the actor's mouthes and as directional as possible. Feedback occurs when the amount of amplification applied to the microphone signal becomes enough that the background noise that the microphone picks up from the speaker is louder than the signal it is amplifying, thus forming ...


4

I went through the same problem. I do a lot of documentary, and therefore I'm in various countries requiring different blocks. Forgetting about the legal aspect of things, all blocks should work in most places. You might get a bit more RF interference in some countries, but within the range of one of the blocks from the EW100 G3 series, you should be able ...


4

First, you will need to provide a power amplifier for each different speaker cabinet. You did not mention what model you have so we don't know what power, what kind of processing, etc. you would need. Then you will need to divide your signal (source not disclosed) into the channels appropriate for each speaker cabinet and come up with five wireless links ...


3

Hi Would be great if it were possible, but as far as I know the output from the receiver is mono and there is no way of getting a stereo signal from it. You would need to look into the Sennheiser IEM systems as these are stereo.


3

Have a look on stage audio sales sites for 'wireless monitors' - there is a huge range. The cost may be a little high, but generally the bandwidth on these devices is very good.


3

I use two rechargeable nickel metal hydride AA batteries with a wireless mic. They don't last as long as normal batteries, but I only need it run for two hours without recharging so it works well for me.


3

This just requires using advanced enough wireless systems. Shure ULX-P for example can support 1440 different frequencies. They most likely mix in to subgroups and then mix subgroups together. Large concert tours will use upwards of 160+ channels so dealing with 60 vocal channels really isn't that big of a deal, especially for a recorded environment ...


3

Advantages: saves you rolling out 2 long cables. Disadvantages: it's a 2.4 GHz system so there's potential for interference from wifi. they add a bit of delay, although 4 ms is not horrendous. you have to remember to recharge the batteries for each gig. every 3-5 years you have to replace the batteries because they wear out. I use a couple of wireless ...


2

It sounds like the wireless receiver outputs a mic signal, not a line level signal. So if you take it in as a line level signal it's going to be very quiet. You either need a line level transmitter/receiver pair or a good mic preamp between the receiver and the camera. EDIT: Iain beat me to it :)


2

Yes, it can be done, but you'll have only mono sound on the 5D. Next week I'll start the post of a project where they've done it this way: For the audio to get in the 5D, they used this mic adapter: (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/674341-REG/Beachtek_DXA_5DA_DXA_5DA_DSLR_Cameras_Passive.html) The sound girl send a mono mixdown signal, wireless to ...


2

My first guess is no. In order to get synchronous playback from your recording device, while playing video back from a 5D, you would need one device to chase timecode from the other. The 5D has no provisions for timecode whatsoever (and they can have slippy internal clocking for video to begin with, so watch out for that in post). In that post you linked to, ...


2

I have worked with those cameras before. Wireless is generally not a good idea. If you do go that way, make sure that you are also recording on your recorder as back up. What you can do is run a wireless link from the camera to your SD for timecode. If you do have to run cables, then make sure you have a great cable guy with you and good quality long XLRs. ...


2

Just off the top of my head, another possible way to do it would be to thread the lav wire through an elastic band, twist the band so it grips the wire, and then use hair pins to clips a loop of the elastic band to the hair. Just might be less troublesome than a tape/hair situation.


2

I use the Micron Explorer 100 series wireless, and have to say they sound really good. I used sennheiser g2 500 systems before and they were really noisy. I have one G3 500 IEM system and while the sound quality is better than the g2 systems, i think that microns will be a better investment if you want to do this professionally. The range of my systems is ...


2

If you've got the budget to work with a Lectrosonic's 400 Series, then just do it. It's the best thing I've ever worked with on a production before and well worth the money. I've had a pair of Sennheiser G3 100's for a year now and they've worked pretty well for me. If you've got Tram's and COS-11 mics that will work with these transmitters, I'm sure it'll ...


2

I've been having a very good experience with Lithium-Polymer 9V rechargeable batteries in my Sennheiser wireless lapel mic. I was able to buy two batteries and a charger for $50.


2

I don't have direct experience with wireless speakers, but I can offer the following reasoning on why you should prefer wired speakers: Most of the frequency spectrum is allocated to licensed users. Products like wireless speakers, bluetooth headsets and WiFi run in the unlicensed ISM bands of 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz and 5.7 GHz. There isn't a lot of bandwidth to ...


2

Compression followed by expansion is often called "companding" and is used in various fields to reduce noise. It is effective in reducing the final level of noise that is introduced between the compression and expansion steps. It will do nothing to improve noise introduced after expansion, and could make noise introduced before compression worse, or leave it ...


2

Musical theatre, more often than not, uses head-worn lavalier microphones that are positioned very close to the mouth. This gives a much greater signal-to-noise ratio for the Front-of-House mixer to work with. These mics are often flesh-coloured so that they are almost impossible to see. Lavalier mounting in musical theatre is a craft that requires an ...


1

You can use wireless repeaters to increase quality over such distances. You need to have 2 pairs of Receiver and transmitter. Connect the Output of one Receiver with the Input of the Second transmitter. Also gain the Signal a bit on the second transmitter. Use different frequencies for each pair.


1

If in the UK... The main reason would be if you want to work in Channel 38 (which is the new designated band for radio mics) a license fee should of course be paid for this. Otherwise if they are G2 Band E (look on the back) they still will work legally for the future in the Channel 70 unregulated band - I wouldnt worry about it too much if channel 70 works ...


1

Historically radio transmission has been moving up in the frequency spectrum VHF = very high frequency UHF = ultra high frequency you may expect better quality and lower power requirements (higher battery life) from UHF, but the experts say the benefit is usually less battle for channels and smaller antennae. Familiarise yourself with the legalities of ...


1

i would say if the gear is to be used by mostly inexperienced people, then maybe the lav is not the way to go. i would think it would be easier to boom.


1

I must say I'm very fond of Lectrosonic's transmitters/receivers! Built like tanks and very trusty in my opinion! The last year I've worked very much with the combo Lectrosonic and DPA, and for the first time when working with lavalier, though I still very much prefer boom, I'm fairy satisfied with what I got!


1

Have the actors use the pins if they have to, but use something around the wire to protect it from the pin. Electrical tape should do. I've never seen special pins before, but perhaps they exist. How many are the actors using? They really only need one or two - the rest of the wire can be attached with surgical tape to the skin and that's much kinder to ...


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