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4

Yea I think the main thing missing from breaking waves is how the water sounds against a body. I would see if you can even mix in a few splashes that you may have, or water sloshing up onto something.


4

That sound has probably never been recorded before since people who are out on the open sea are usually in some sort of craft, whether it be a large liner or a small skiff or lifeboat. In either case the ocean is going to be interacting with said craft, breaking over the bow or slapping against the side. So, unless you're planning on recording from a hot air ...


3

Quite an interesting project indeed. The paper towel roll and cups are are working as an acoustic megaphone, also called (in ancient times) speaking trumpet. Directional focus of the radiating sound waves is part of the way the megaphone works, but that's not all, as, as you have noticed, there is also amplification in other directions, not just the front ...


3

Amplitude is an objective measurement. In a waveform, it is the value of the y axis at any given point in time. Loudness is a subjective measurement, based on how we perceive amplitude and other psychoacoustic dynamics like the Fletcher–Munson curves. There is no absolute way to measure loudness, there are many different options that will give you ...


3

A perfect sine wave can only be one shape as it is derived from geometry: So it always sounds the same. But yes, a wave can take any shape and this affects the timbre. An interesting point however, is that these movements all need to be reproduced by the speaker, which is possibly the weakest link in the chain. Consider how a speaker reproduces a perfect ...


3

According to theory, all complex sound waves can be decomposed into a set of sine waves, which are the most basic of wave shapes. Two sine waves of the same frequency will be identical except possibly for amplitude. That is, one may be louder than the other, but they're otherwise the same and can't be distinguished.


2

Interesting idea. If you play back a sound recorded from a solid, thereby rendering an inaudible sound audible, and it re-enters our bodies through our ears, I doubt that it'd be perceived in the same way as if we'd truly felt it through our guts, bones, hair, what have you. That's not to say that your idea isn't valid for sound design and as an effective ...


2

Spanner is a new AAX plugin from maggot which does the kind of thing you are asking. www.maagot.co.nz/software/spanner.shtml


2

You are mostly seeing the difference in quality between a professional mic and audio interface rather than a laptop mic and built in consumer sound card. The lower frequencies are picked up well on both, but the higher frequencies are much less sensitive and much more sparse. If you look at the actual pattern of it, the pattern is relatively simple. ...


2

Im still not sure of your exact question, but I couldn't tell much from the audio recording you posted, and you only posted the waveform for 1 of the titillates. If you can post the original titillate you found online, that would be more helpful. If you're directly looking at waveforms, you're likely looking at a recording that has been processed with EQs, ...


2

What makes a signal audible is it's variations, not it's absolute level. Both examples you mention (0% or 100% duty cycles are in fact DC signals, either at 0 or full voltage) can therefore not be audible.


2

Simple frequency intervals generally sound good. Our auditory processing parts of our brains appreciate simple relationships. A perfect fourth has a 4:3 frequency ratio and a diminished fifth (arguably not a very pleasant interval) has a 45:32 frequency ratio. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_ratio https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music) If ...


2

Always run it as the very last plugin in the chain. Even if you are going to be sending the mix away for mastering, setting both threshold & out ceiling to -0.3 will just prevent overs. If even at those settings it's too hot, then pull back the entire mix earlier in the chain. If levels are too low, you can use it to lift the overall levels, but I ...


1

Assuming it is the last plugin in your chain & you're using it it as a 'mastering leveller' then I'd set the out ceiling to just under zero. I find -0.3 avoids nasty crunching even on cheap playback systems & it survives format conversion well. Then it's just a matter of dialling down the Threshold until you can feel the compression happening, then ...


1

Pitch content that roughly matches the resonance tendencies of the shape will also get a boost relative to the other frequency content. The resonance frequencies of the tube are probably very limited, hence the sound will continue to be unbalanced in terms of EQ. The flare of the old phonographs have a wider range of resonant frequencies. The vibrations of ...


1

Particular intervals don’t sound good — they sound familiar. It all comes down to what you are used to. Which intervals were used in most of the music you have heard in your life, depending on its musical heritage. How trained your ear is to appreciate various intervals. If you grew up in Texas and have listened to country music all your life, the ...


1

I'm not sure I understand the question, but you can use the Fourier transform (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourier_transform) to decompose any signal into its constituent frequencies. The result should be trivial if your original signal is just one sine wave being generated at a constant frequency.


1

Sound is generated from signals based on movement of a speaker cone. The cone responds to the voltage applied resulting in a magnetic field that drives a magnet to push the cone. The movement of the cone pushes air which produces pressure waves that we perceive as sound. At no voltage, the magnet simply sits at rest. At full voltage, the magnet will be ...


1

The only shape a digital sound wave can not take is a perfect square wave (or impulse but its the same issue). This is a mathematical limitation caused by the electronics them selves. They simply need time to respond. Basically if you consider the sides of the square wave as perfectly vertical and the top as perfectly flat you will come to the realization ...


1

Can a digital sound wave take any shape? Now, there's no such thing as a digital sound wave. But most digital (16 bit wav 44.1kS/s, 24 bit wav 48kS/s, and higher quality) will get you VERY CLOSE to any reasonable shape. There will be some limitations, For example, very low amplitude sine waves will have noticeable quantization distortion. Also, frequencies ...


1

I agree with David, and have had to do this recently myself. You kind of want just some intermittent splashing going on without the white noise of water dispersal from waves. If you want the sound of being on a boat then recording on a boat or waves hitting posts at a pier might o the trick. But if you dont want the sound of a ot then my suggestion if ...


1

In addition to the aforementioned sound of water slapping against the boat I'd also try to work in some small sounds of the vessel reacting to the waves and the movement; anything from small wood creaks in rhythm to the waves to bigger moans of the hull depending on the ship. The SoundWorks Collection video to All is Lost (which is nominated for Best Sound ...


1

I think the best you could hope for is to use a very long boom pole to give you separation between the boat you are in and the point at which you are recording. Jay's point about working out what kind of sea you are trying to create is also very important. The chances of you getting a perfect recording are fairly small which means you'll have to "design" a ...


1

One way would be to record from a boat at sea. Or you could potentially use waves on a lake or take a boat out onto a lake to record for a similar effect depending on the situation.


1

As long as your files already contain the empty space at the tails to contain the decay of the effect and you are applying the same preset to each one, then you can use QuicKeys. I do technical pitch conversions (PAL conversions) this way. I can set it process files (sometime 40 or 50 5.1 tracks) with Pitch N Time Pro and walk away. I come back at the end ...


1

I think, unless you have one of your bones in contact with a surface, the effect won't be one of "realism". Wouldn't our fleshy foot-soles do the same thing as the shock mount? Doesn't mean it won't be a cool effect though; just last night i was recording some stuff w/ a hypercardioid+contact mic. Mainly for a surreal effect, though. Sound recordings don't ...


1

Hmm, this is definitely a cool idea. But whilst the effect of mixing in contact-mic recordings with standard recordings would no doubt create some very interesting effects, the only practical use of this I can think of would be to add an interesting spin to POV pieces. When recording, you'd contact-mic your own head up (or the head of the subject of the ...


1

I'd have to agree with NoiseJockey on this one. I don't think simply adding in a sound recorded through a contact microphone would achieve the results you're thinking of. To approach that ideal, you'd probably need to create a custom sound installation. Things like this have been attempted in cinema in the past...devices like vibrating seats, gas emitters ...


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