4

In my experience, it all depends on where the audio is to be used next. If there is a limiter of some kind in the next phase of the process. Sometimes a limiter will be applied at varying levels below 0dB to prevent overload and clipping distortion. -o.1dBFS is a peak normalization preset because basically, that is the highest level a sample can be without ...


2

If you normalize all of your samples to -0.1 dB, then use them in your DAW projects, you'll end up clipping your audio tracks all the time as soon as you use a plug-in. I use Pro Tools where the channel faders default to unity gain in a new project. The channel fader on an audio track is post-plugin. This means if I put a Kick Drum sample on Channel 1, and ...


2

You can't do this in the multi-track section of Audition, but you can in the waveform editor if you turn on the preview editor in the view menu. Not quite what you're after, but still a very useful feature if you need visual feedback of how an effect will change your audio before you click apply, and also a good teaching tool.


2

That is because what you are doing is called DFT rather than FFT. All stuff in computers are discrete. Sounds become aliased when they are sampled into 'grids' while the analog counterparts don't. Thus analog signals have true FFTs while the digital ones will always have some errors. If you try doing DFT on a pure sine wave, what you will get will not be a ...


2

Basically, you're right with all your points. The level between different albums can indeed be dramatically different, depending on how agressively it was mastered. Records from the early days of CDs are often very quiet (engineers celebrated not having to worry about vinyl's noise floor anymore, and also, early CD players didn't really work reliable with ...


1

You need a digital sampler. Most DAWs come with their own, dedicated software sampler but a great 3rd-party sampler is CWITEC's TX16Wx sampler since it's modeled after real hardware technology. Also, defined instruments in soundfonts can be configured to span the whole keyboard spectrum so double check and make sure they aren't limited to one key like you ...


1

You can edit out all sorts of noises with iZotope RX 2 and e.g. Adobe Audition's spectral editor, but that'll take ages and is not worth it, if there are constant mouth noises. Follow Miska Seppa's advice and try to solve the problems as well as you can during recording and minimize the amount of editing. Spectral editors and "audio repair" tools are nice ...


1

Who is recording them? You should try to minimize pops and smacks in the recording phase. Of course some speakers, older people especially, are more prone to making extra cicks and smacks, but you should maybe record from a little bit further away and keep the speakers hydrated with a jug of water etc. Take enough breaks. The audiobook guys usually are ...


1

This post may be insightful: http://www.stavrosound.com/blog/wordpress/2012/02/the-rice-crispies-mix-snap-crackle-pop/ The deal is, with what you mention, is that it really doesn't matter what software tool you use at all - there is no magic bullet to this stuff. it's about rolling up your sleeves and getting dirty like how professional dialogue editors ...


1

Reaper, hands down the most flexible editor and also with fully configurable scrub modes. Cross-platform is just the beginning of the benefits. www.reaper.fm Cheers.


1

I'd do like I've always done, buy a few vital things with the highest quality possible (it's more expensive in the long run to upgrade), and work only with the sources until I could afford more trustworthy monitoring so I could start filtering and processing more seriously. Of course I wouldn't be nowhere near buying an Aaton at that time (still isn't), so ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible