5

I may be wrong but this sounds to me like a simple ring modulator.


4

There are different aspects in "the Mickey Mouse voice (effect)": One is the relatively high general pitch of the voice. Mickey has always been spoken by a man, but the speakers voice's pitch or frequency (called 'F0') has always been at the level of a higher woman's or a child's voice. So, there is generally two possible ways to achieve that: a) if ...


3

Have you considered flex-pitch in a product like Logic X? I don't do music and therefore haven't used it a lot, but you can make some interesting effects with it. You record the phrase in your normal voice, then use pitch correction to change the note and octave to your liking. It seems like you have a decent ear for what makes the Mickey voice (high ...


3

Having listened to mentioned in comments - the effect doesn't come in at the 49s mark, it's there right from the start. It is definitely a phase issue - but I'm not sure what's causing it. If you've eliminated the potential physical issues as described by Joel, than what remains is a routing issue. I'm going to take a ...


3

I'm not too familiar with Garage Band or Logic (I'm a Windows Cubase user), but your best bet is to simply record a child, but I'm assuming that's not an option. You can use just about any DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) to record your voice and using a blend of pitch shifting (shifting the lead vocal an octave or two down) and combining the newly modified ...


3

Well I've tried to come close : I used reaper, Izotope Trash 2 for saturation and Izotope Ozone 5 for multiband compression. 1. pitch shift - 3 semitones 2. Cut some low freqs with EQ 3. Izotope Trash with these settings : http://i.imgur.com/Sd5k2lq.jpg 4. Izotope Ozone with these settings : http://imgur.com/a/6RC4G You ...


3

unless they are very talented, i think it's a very good idea to not use employees on videos. so your boss is right, but he should also bare the consequence of it and hire an (amateur) actor. you'll get a professional sounding result unlike with any of the options you've already mentioned. just make sure it's recorded and 'directed' properly.


2

Compare similar phenoms like eh uh pt zk you know. If a lot of them are identical it might be Computer generated!


2

I'm not sure you'll find a magic plug-in for this. The majority of the effect is performance from the actor and then some EQ, reverb and maybe a bit of distortion. Remember that an FX plug-in will enhance what is already there, but if it's not there is the first place (from the actors) no amount of processing will give you the magic you desire.


2

You can certainly drop the pitch, but the tricky bit is that a tenor voice has a very different timbre - there are different harmonics, different resonances etc. The preferred solution would be to get someone with a deep voice to help you :-) If you have no-one else to help then try a combination of lowering the pitch, and stretching the time frame. The ...


2

You could probably use Melodyne to alter the pitch slightly, and preferably the formants the most. This could make your voice so different that your boss won't recognize it for beeing you, and still don't make your voice into an artificial sounding one.... There's a free 30 day trial version at their website.


2

Get an audio host such as FL Studio or Cockos Reaper Download an audio repeater called Virtual Audio Cable (VAC) and make sure you run the program as administrator In the control panel, configure soundcard playback to primary speakers driver and configure soundcard recording to primary mic driver Open the audio host and put the Pitch effect on the master ...


2

This sounds very much like the MicroKorg vocoder but most vocoders will sound similar. There's a lot of free ones out there that will do the same thing. I would recreate it by recording the vocoder processing and the dry unprocessed dialogue at the same time on 2 separate tracks as the mix is mostly dry. The vocoder doesn't have any note change, it's just ...


2

I have just seen the following article where this sound effect is mentioned (http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/la-en-craft-star-wars-sound-20160204-story.html). It is interesting to note that the dialogue was recorded with two mics: one in the helmet itself and the other on the chest. Clearly the timbre of the two recordings will be different, ...


2

Unfortunately, there is no analytical way of seperating the signals the way you want, i.e. you can't isolate the vocals. To go a little more in depth about why there isn't an analytical solution, consider this problem to be one of linear algebra. For simplicity's sake we'll assume our three sources (vocals, drums, saxophone) are in mono, i.e. three vectors ...


2

You will need to search for tutorials on "Audio Sampling", "Audio Pitch Manipulation", "Audio Editing" and "Video Editing". You will need to learn how to use a Digital Audio Workstation such as "Reaper" or "Pro-Tools". If you are starting from scratch, it's a long road ahead of you, but rewarding as you make the journey.


2

No, Ashok, there is not. If you are doing this for a client then you need to pass on the cost of the voice talent.


1

Most likely there is a fault with your recording set up or microphone. The 'Mars effect' might actually be caused by a low frequency vibration that is getting into the mic, possibly from the computer or fan somewhere. It may cause some modulation on the signal depending on how loud it is, some structural vibrations from a desk can be quite loud. Try ...


1

It is a common practice in video games to have one actor voicing several characters. For film and TV there shouldn't be an issue since actors are ussualy capable of voicing, though over-dubbing is another well used technique in post production.


1

A bit of pitch I guess, the rest is acting an a strange language.


1

Glad the OP is no longer having the problem, but I am very confident I hear the artifacts of a noise reduction plugin all over this YouTube recording. Coupled with a considerable amount of ambient room noise from the mic not being close enough to the person speaking, NR will cause exactly this kind of result when the settings are too aggressive or drastic. ...


1

FINALLY! I found this in the Audacity docs, and this part of it: Right-click once again over the required input device, click Properties then click the Advanced tab. Set Default Format to mono or stereo to match with the number of "recording channels" in Audacity's Device Toolbar or the Devices tab of Audacity Preferences (Audio I/O tab in legacy Audacity ...


1

Marcus Weaver-Hightower, PhD states in this video that "there's no magic transcriber out there" to remove human effort from the transcription process. That being said, his suggestion of using voice recognition software to speed up the transcription process may be something of value to you. You could consider using software like the Max Planck Institute's ...


1

You may have a look at Melodyne. I've never used it though.


1

One option is live pitch-shifting plugin, for example Waves Ultrapitch - it can pitch up and down in realtime as well as shifting along the "formant" axis which can make the voice sound more nasally or more throaty. To set it up, you would just have to have your microphone feed routed through a DAW running the plugin; the delay that it induces is really ...


1

The better question is what does a parrot sound like to you? To me the most telling qualities of a parrot voice is the heavy inflections that might scale an octave (in my imagination at least, I dont own a parrot). Also maybe something to distort the sound a little, like a light distortion or ring mod. Maybe some EQ-ing to get rid of the bass in a humans ...


1

The Vocoders I use are the built in Ableton Live, and NI Razors vocoder.The way I would try to recreate this particular sound is by first recording your dialogue, then maybe duplicating the track and pitching it up followed by throwing a vocoder on it. Maybe even playing with a filter, an Eq, and blending the tracks together. You could also playback your ...


1

You can download the ladspa plugins for Audacity. That has a bunch of free tools that can help you achieve what you want. You can mess around with pitch shift and add flangers or whatever effect suits your requirement.


1

I've recently stumbled across this software from the guys at SoundMorph called TimeFlux. Looks like an awesome and intuitive little tool that allows you to morph up to 4 different sound files in interesting ways. I've had no chance to use it myself, yet, as I just came across it this week but it looks like it could give you some very unique results and ...


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