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4

This is a very big topic, I will start by redirecting you to a very useful site/article: Mastering for Vinyl from Recording magazine. Also I would like to state that I'm not a mastering engineer, I'm a mixing engineer only working with analog gear, so I'll try to tell you what we keep in mind when going for vinyl. The article is far more detailed and ...


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Analogue medium do technically have a higher dynamical range than digital due to the nature of being analogue ("atom"-level wave description, although you have material limitations of the material vinyl itself, but still). If the human ear can hear the difference of a 24-bit digital version of it, or even a 16-bit version, is of course open for debate. If ...


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It's hard to say for sure, but I believe you're right in this case - the tape marker appears to pass underneath the headshell, and there's a pronounced "pop" sound as it does so. I believe the tape is bumping the stylus back into the previous groove, thus creating an endless loop. It's worth mentioning that the artist in this video was using that "loop" as a ...


3

The article you read has either been misinterpreted or was monstrously misleading. It is possible that what they were referring to was the fact that the frequency response required from an analogue medium was only enough to record 100kB/s of digital information. That does not mean that the recording quality of the original recording was equivalent to a ...


3

A record works by cutting horizontal grooves in vertical troths that the needle runs through. These are typically a loop which works from the outside to the inside of the record. In order to make a loop, either the spiral is replaced with a circle (with the loop lasting as long as the rotation can hold audio, or you can force it by placing tape over part ...


2

I think this little project going to be dependent on your desire as well as budget. You probably already know this. Getting the audio into digital format isn't all that difficult. There are a lot of different turntables which automatically do this for you now (some doing direct Vinyl to SD card MP3 conversions). Else, you can always just run Audacity on ...


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Honestly, I think you'd have a much simpler task if you tried some de-clicker software on the best of the pair than attempt to keep two independently-recorded analogue tracks in prefect phase-sync for three minutes whilst cross-cutting by eye. I know of no software that could automate your chosen task. My de-clicker of choice is Waves X-Click Two others I'...


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From my experience as a vinyl cutting engineer, the phase response makes it look more triangular in shape, but it sounds very similar.


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Looking at the specs of the IBM 2401 tape drive from that era, you can see it's at least more complicated than that. The fastest of the 3 models recorded 90 kbyte/s while running the tape at 112.5 inch/s (and you thought a 15 inch/s tape recorder was fast), and the data rate rose with tape speed. That does not mean this was the limit of the medium, though. ...


1

There is no way to compare them because one is analog and one is digital. The way to calculate kbps is: bit depth * sample rate * channels Neither vinyl nor cassettes use bit depth or sample rates. The best you can try to compare is the similarity between bit depth of the CD and dynamic range of the cassette or vinyl


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Thing is that such a signal only exist in theory - practically this signal will be made up of a number of sine waves with varying frequency and amplitude. The generator or the sample rate format determines the upper frequency limit (i.e. how "sharp" that seemingly discontinuous signal edge will be a the corner/peaks). This alone will transform your step ...


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Guys who master vinyl will tell you something like this: - A pure step signal has an infinite spectrum and, considering you can't hear above 20kHz (a lot less as you get older) there's no point doing what you suggest. You may then say "oh please do it" and the vinyl mastering guy might say "OK we'll give it a go" and then completely ignore your request ...


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Do never touch your needle with your finger! Usually there is a small carbon needle brush provided with each new cartridge. I got one with each of my Ortofon cartridges and with the Shure I bought once, so I guess this is standard, though you might get one in commerce if you don't have any. In order to clean your stylus from small fibers, etc. just brush ...


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I don't know if this is approved of, but I have a little brush that I use. It's about 3 inches long with the handle and I can't remember where I got it, but it's not too rough and works perfectly. Needless to say, I use it carefully. I pull the actual needle out(Sure & Stanton cartridges) every few months to get right up inside with the brush. I think I ...


1

After doing a lot of research I came up with a way of digitizing my records, which I am quite happy with. I posted my recommendations already at Discogs, but would like to share my experience here too. I have to say that I ended up spending much more than I anticipated, but I am fine with that. Recordings sound amazing and let us say I made myself a couple ...


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I would never use apps for this, I'd count the bars before using an app. I use Rane's Scratch Live. It has some pretty accurate BPM detection. There are other good ones out there though. I have a BPM display built into my mixer actually, but I never use it TBH. What I would do: If you're going to play each track to get a sample, then you may as well run ...


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the "digital remastering" itself is not a problem. the year it was done and by who will affect whether it became a problem in a specific instance. if you can get a mint copy of an original issue vinyl album, it's often nicer sounding, but it depends on your taste of course and your reference points. the digital vs analog aspect of remastering especially ...


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