12

Well, the best way to do it is to find yourself a wild dragon that hasn't been exposed to humans too much and by tickling it behind its ears you will cause it to roar. You just have to make sure to stay clear of the tail and head though. And for the real answer: Most dragon roars or rather "animal" roars are a combination of different roars, breathing ...


6

It's a growing field of research and there's clearly much interest into procedural audio, because of its interactive/dynamic and synthesized nature. P.A. is mainly proposed to be a great solution for anything that's repetitive and for creating common "boilerplate" sounds such as footsteps and ambient noises that consume time, which the busy audio designer ...


6

Just FIND sounds. They come from EVERYWHERE. Some are recorded outside, some in staircases, some are found in patches on synthesizers or even generated in FL Studio-like programs. You should get intimate with time-based FX like reverb and flange, competent with EQ, and experiment with things like pitch-shift, reverse, and time stretch. Be creative and ...


5

No birds or other animals in BG. Quiet BG, since everyone is indoors trying to stay warm. Small sounds seem magnified in contrast to the quiet of the ambient sounds. Distant sounds are duller due to greater atmospheric absorption of high frequencies in colder temperatures.


5

Hi, AudioGaming developer here (which by the way is French, so please forgive my poor english skills) ! PA has been an ignored tool for a very long time, and because of that we sometimes have to struggle a bit against long-established habits, creation pipelines and existing content. But it really just is one more tool, not really designed to replace ...


5

The DAW is not that important (FL is ok to start). Since you are getting started and you will find difficult to design the sounds, you need a good set of VSTi plugins that emulate the video game consoles' soundchips. The good news is that there are loads of these plugins to make chiptunes (most of them free)... just take a look... Chipmusic Plugins 9 of the ...


3

if there's dialogue, over compress it. Really bring up the lip and mouth noises, the subtle slurps and wheezes. It's really uncomfortable listening and I feel it brings out the desperation/harshness of talking in the cold


3

An idea for the wings: Try grabbing a pair of gloves (any kind will do as long as they make noise when you flap them). Put them together palm-to-palm and grib the wrist part in your hands. Record yourself shaking the fingers back and forth rapidly. This is a fairly well-used technique for the sound of bird wings, if it sounds familiar... Take these ...


3

If you are interested in procedural audio, take some time to peruse Andy Farnell's website: http://obiwannabe.co.uk One of the best resources on the net. His book "Designing Sound" is also fantastic.


3

First off, I think it's cool they didn't just ask you to make it sound like Transformers! But I think it's a difficult task because the sound in the clip is very stylised and not actually in very tight sync to the action. It feels like you hear more swooping/flying around and atmos than actual synchronised movement sounds, so perhaps part of the challenge ...


3

From my point of view, there are often very good results when you use the best of the both worlds = simple audio manipulation + synthesis. In your case ("dark-feeling game" as you mentioned), it might be fun to work with a sound that is usually considered to be very close to actual ambient music. A combination of some dark electronic soundscapes and layered ...


3

It happens all the time. We also contact friends and peers who might have the sounds we need, and trade effects back and forth (which is a great way to expand your library). Everything in audio post is predicated on budget, time and need. We'd all love to record or synthesize brand new sounds for every element needed in a film, but that's just not a ...


3

To make chip music sounding 'nostalgic' you will also need to recreate the techniques used in the old days where sound channel is limited. Like you can have only 2 square waves channel. (that was NES's limitation, 2 Squares , 1 Triangle , 1 Noise and (delta modulation) sample channel) So, in order to form a chord you would use a very fast arpeggio to create ...


2

always funny to see different sound effects editors discover the same sound. I know that early in my career I thought that I was being very creative and original when I'd find a great library sound that worked perfectly in a given moment, then feel sick to my stomach when I'd hear that same effect cut in by someone else in a similar spot on a completely ...


2

are the files already named, and the new ones you'll record will match them? If so, I'd suggest adding a sorting prefix before importing them into protools. something that if you sort alphabetically they'll all line up into the way you plan to record the new lines. You may want to break slightly away from the "single track" thing if your workflow will ...


2

Shepard's Tone Illusion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shepard_tone


2

The Jedi lightsabres are tuned in A and the Sith ones are tuned in G. The 2 semitone pitch difference is present to make the duels seem more sinister and tense. It works too, if you pitched them both the same there would be a noticable difference in dramatic effect.


2

Approach your explanation of the importance of sound from a marketing and branding perspective--that is what is important to developers. Sounds applications make shape how the application is perceived--if skype's message alert sound wasn't carefully created it could have a serious negative effect on their branding. This is why there's outcry about the ...


2

I've just watched the longplay of Super Mario 3D Land, and have some advice for you. I work with casual games for about a year, and those sounds is from my type of work. The basic rule for this SFX's is "imagine, that everything is tiny". It's like living in a toy world. The sounds is more rounded and all envelopes is as glide as possible. In foley try to ...


2

There are probably as many approaches to this as there are people doing sound design, there's no hard and fast rules, and finding your way is part of the 'art' of it, the thing that makes it yours rather than someone else's recipe, or worse, a cliche. First thing to do is get comfortable in some audio editing or sequencing software package. It doesnt which ...


2

Use Ableton! Then go to its inbuild granular synthesis of audio files and warp it with rythmical/transient algorithm. Check the transient marker and move them if needed. Then set the mode to -->|. (Looks like two arrows in default). So every gunshot is now played once. Then you can pitch it without quanticing or loosing pitch. Other way is slice to Sampler ...


2

I'd try several DAWs before settling down, most have free trials. Once you've committed to a platform and started investing in specific resources for it, inertia makes it difficult for you to switch, so take your time. I'm an Ableton fan, in part because creating your own macro/automated setups for effects chains is incredibly addictive and easy... and also ...


2

Are you looking for a degree in this field? Or just online resources to learn yourself? Here is a course you can look into: https://www.digipen.edu/academics/degree-programs/bamsd/ I am part of the audio programming degree here. Its absolutely amazing and if you are into music and video games this is where you would want to go.


2

If you're looking to learn about foley this is the book... http://www.amazon.ca/The-Foley-Grail-Performing-Animation/dp/0240811259


2

Here's a few great books on Sound Design/Effects, and they explain it for most mediums: http://www.amazon.com/Sound-Effects-Bible-Create-Hollywood-ebook/dp/B003FQM2S4/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1419161790&sr=1-1&keywords=sound+effects+in+books http://www.amazon.com/Sound-Design-Expressive-Effects-Cinema-ebook/dp/B003FQM2XY/ref=sr_1_3?s=...


2

it sounds like some sort of pad, are you sure that's brass? definitely a wet sound. try to find a pad in your DAW that sounds somewhat similar. Add a flanger effect and toy around with the decay. Shorten the release up too. I think you'll be able to recreate it that way. The humming sound is a guy going "o0o0o0o-o0o0-o0o" but with a vocoder effect on it. I ...


2

I will give you some feedback! I like long and constructive feedback so I will give that to you. One of the things I really liked was that bottle smash, really good job on that sound effect. I also like the underlying music tones at the beginning and the end of the trailer. Things I didn't care for is how everything sounded very close and could easily tell ...


2

I would start off by learning wwise. Audiokinetic has a lot of tutorials and sample projects available. Beyond that, I would download Unity or UE4 and start following tutorials on implementation. Knowing how game audio works and is implemented will help you begin to sound design for the game and the players experience. Further, when you are playing games, ...


1

Game development is actually slightly more harsher to the programmers, because few people care about how the technology behind the game is constructed. All they care, for a reason, is the game: what they see, hear, read and can feel. Thus, the work of the programmers is generally not noticed or studied, because it's simply not apparent to those that aren't ...


1

Look at Pure Data (or the commercial Max/MSP) on the software front and Arduino or Raspberry Pi (or both) on the hardware front. You'll need to dig in a lot to understand how to get them to do what you want, but those are the tools most often used for this type of creative interaction projects (involving sensors).


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