12

Well, the best way to do it is to find yourself a wild dragon that hasn't been exposed to humans too much and by tickling it behind its ears you will cause it to roar. You just have to make sure to stay clear of the tail and head though. And for the real answer: Most dragon roars or rather "animal" roars are a combination of different roars, breathing ...


8

Whoo-whee, that's a subjective area...that's also really fun! Can't wait to see the answers here. Starting with what works (and, granted, is cliched) doesn't hurt: Striking thin metal wires or springs under tension with other metallic objects. Good for base layers and achieving the baseline Star Wars or Wall-E sound, even if you do it just as an exercise to ...


6

the few things that I run into when doing forcefields: 1) electrical forcefields are going to sound different than magical forcefields. Be sure to know what's causing the FF story-wise as you pull together your source elements. 2) forcefields tend to be tricky to mix unless you plan the frequency spectrums out carefully. Its very easy to get caught up ...


6

It's a growing field of research and there's clearly much interest into procedural audio, because of its interactive/dynamic and synthesized nature. P.A. is mainly proposed to be a great solution for anything that's repetitive and for creating common "boilerplate" sounds such as footsteps and ambient noises that consume time, which the busy audio designer ...


6

Just FIND sounds. They come from EVERYWHERE. Some are recorded outside, some in staircases, some are found in patches on synthesizers or even generated in FL Studio-like programs. You should get intimate with time-based FX like reverb and flange, competent with EQ, and experiment with things like pitch-shift, reverse, and time stretch. Be creative and ...


5

Hi there, I'm going to respond as someone who is in the same boat as you are, recently graduating with an Associates in Recording Arts, focusing in Game Audio. First off, The Aaron Marks book mentioned above is pretty much the bible in the Game Audio community, he (and many other famous sound designers) contributes not only practical information, but ...


5

Hi, AudioGaming developer here (which by the way is French, so please forgive my poor english skills) ! PA has been an ignored tool for a very long time, and because of that we sometimes have to struggle a bit against long-established habits, creation pipelines and existing content. But it really just is one more tool, not really designed to replace ...


5

No birds or other animals in BG. Quiet BG, since everyone is indoors trying to stay warm. Small sounds seem magnified in contrast to the quiet of the ambient sounds. Distant sounds are duller due to greater atmospheric absorption of high frequencies in colder temperatures.


5

The DAW is not that important (FL is ok to start). Since you are getting started and you will find difficult to design the sounds, you need a good set of VSTi plugins that emulate the video game consoles' soundchips. The good news is that there are loads of these plugins to make chiptunes (most of them free)... just take a look... Chipmusic Plugins 9 of the ...


4

Try to run sounds through a fast doppler and layer those sounds together with real world weapons and wire sounds. Could be a way to give each laser sound a subtle character. Try to experiment with feedback loops and run it through a doppler. It's already late and these ideas are all that came into my mind. I hope that you can use them.


3

First of, I'm ecstatic that there's a new Tribes game, one of the finest and underrated Online FPS games of all time. Trailer is great, great panning and mixing, the stereo image was amazing especially when the crafts flew over head at the end. Can you answer some questions? in terms of sound design, are you just mixing? recording foley (if needed)? and ...


3

Spore famously used PD as their audio engine but it took a hell of a lot of work to get to play nice in a game context. The problem is that PD isn't made to be IO efficient, it works great standalone but in a game there's a whole load of processing and memory requests, making them operate in an orderly fashion is all part of a game programmer's job (...


3

This does change from project to project but here is my short list of negatives: Time Constraints Tools (programmer time = ironically a time constraints too) Everything else is a mixed bag. Ironically in my humble opinion the console resources are not that important IF you have tools and engineering support to handle the console limitations intelligently. ...


3

Well, if you mean cutting up trailers and doing a sound re-design on them, you'll want to tag them as a sound re-design so as to not be confused with the real deal. If it's trailer's that you've actually done, I believe it should be fine since it is your own work and being shown for demonstration purposes. In my reel I make sure to tag the production ...


3

Experience and Passion. Not necessarily paid experience, but you must be able to show that you understand how games work and how to design sounds for them. Also be able to talk about them, so play alot! Passion because game studios run on passion, no one is in it for the money ;) you've got to love what you do, and drive yourself and other team members to ...


3

Hi, Benjie! You have already very nice suggestions above and I'd like to share mine too: very recently, by accident, I step into a sonority very close to the laser thing. (Apart from handling the gun and other great details that should make the difference) I took a file of a metal impact with some reverb on it, reversed it (here I might choose to keep the ...


3

Hey Michael! For learning by yourself I suggest you use either Unreal Development Kit or Unity 3D. They're both free and quite easy to get into. When I teach at Stockholm University I let my students replace the sfx in one of the UDK levels. It takes me about four hours to teach them the basics of the User Interface and implementation of audio. This is a ...


3

If you are interested in procedural audio, take some time to peruse Andy Farnell's website: http://obiwannabe.co.uk One of the best resources on the net. His book "Designing Sound" is also fantastic.


3

An idea for the wings: Try grabbing a pair of gloves (any kind will do as long as they make noise when you flap them). Put them together palm-to-palm and grib the wrist part in your hands. Record yourself shaking the fingers back and forth rapidly. This is a fairly well-used technique for the sound of bird wings, if it sounds familiar... Take these ...


3

if there's dialogue, over compress it. Really bring up the lip and mouth noises, the subtle slurps and wheezes. It's really uncomfortable listening and I feel it brings out the desperation/harshness of talking in the cold


3

First off, I think it's cool they didn't just ask you to make it sound like Transformers! But I think it's a difficult task because the sound in the clip is very stylised and not actually in very tight sync to the action. It feels like you hear more swooping/flying around and atmos than actual synchronised movement sounds, so perhaps part of the challenge ...


3

From my point of view, there are often very good results when you use the best of the both worlds = simple audio manipulation + synthesis. In your case ("dark-feeling game" as you mentioned), it might be fun to work with a sound that is usually considered to be very close to actual ambient music. A combination of some dark electronic soundscapes and layered ...


3

It happens all the time. We also contact friends and peers who might have the sounds we need, and trade effects back and forth (which is a great way to expand your library). Everything in audio post is predicated on budget, time and need. We'd all love to record or synthesize brand new sounds for every element needed in a film, but that's just not a ...


3

To make chip music sounding 'nostalgic' you will also need to recreate the techniques used in the old days where sound channel is limited. Like you can have only 2 square waves channel. (that was NES's limitation, 2 Squares , 1 Triangle , 1 Noise and (delta modulation) sample channel) So, in order to form a chord you would use a very fast arpeggio to create ...


2

Have you looked at the Source SDK (Valve softwares modding engine) - If I remember correctly there are a few maps that are freely available e.g. one of the first levels in Half Life 2. Basically you can replace all for this level, and add some of your own. I am pretty sure that UDK and unity have similar levels available to play with.


2

Try taking any sort of electric hum or buzz and running it through a RTAS pitch shifter with a high feedback. The more you pitch it the more powerful the forcefield will sound.


2

Game design, team vision, scheduling work, the level of integration of the audio design within the game design all affect quality more than technical restrictions. I'm fortunate to be on a project where audio is equal amongst animation, art, narrative, etc. but that's rare. If I had to specify a technical constraint, memory tends to be more limiting than ...


2

1.how long have you been in the video games industry and how did you get started? started in 2004 designing, programming and doing sounds for Flash games. Currently work as Audio Lead at Remedy Entertainment. 2.what equipment do you use in the studio and for foley recordings? and what computer programmes and Middlware used? We outsource a lot of the the ...


2

What kind of game is it? What kind of perspective are we hearing the rivers from? If you have a contact mic or hydrophone, try recording running water by attaching the mic to a pipe (non-metallic preferably), or some other surface which is in contact with running water. I've recorded some great running water sounds using contact mics, which I imagine would ...


2

My whole basement is a giant Amerigo Vespucci sail boat that creaks wherever you go. There's a spot on the first step of the stairs that has a wide bandwidth going from high to low frequencies. I recorded it by controlling the speed of the creeks with my foot or my hand and got some laser type sounds this way. Laser in real life don't make any sound so I ...


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