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18

I don't know where you read about USB interfaces needing to "compress the sound", but it's nonsense. For your application two channels will do; at 96 kHz and 24 Bit that's less than 5 MBit/s: even USB-1.0 can handle that without compression. and USB-2.0 is already more than ten times faster, so even in multichannel applications it's often plenty good enough. ...


7

That is the result of bad isolation of either the DAC or the ADC. If the internal circuitry of the interface and the actual capture or playback circuitry share a common power supply, the operation of the electronics itself cause a distortion to the power being supplied to the capture or playback circuits. Capture and output both rely on a fixed reference ...


6

It was bound to happen before long: - Not easy to achieve technically and I can't vouch for its quality but I know two guys who have facebook "liked" this product and one of them does live gigs. The trick is to efficiently take a slice of the 5V offered from the USB and efficiently convert it to a higher voltage that is more practical for audio mixing such ...


5

A good digital signal should either get there or not. Minor differences in cable quality are not going to have any impact at all other than latency. Latency is simply the delay in how long it takes to get to point a to point b and won't impact the sound quality significantly. USB is a digital signal, so a "premium" USB cable is a load of crap. There is ...


4

If you won't be using it on stage or with other MIDI gear apart from a computer, a USB only on your keyboard controller should be okay. (Personally I find the connection more stable) Modern PC's should allow you to route the MIDI signals to other USB-MIDI devices plugged into the PC within the OS or software. In my experience with Macs, you can do the ...


4

A few quick notes At stage volumes, you really really want to be using a SSD Drive. You will have issues with normal platter style HDD's at stage volumes due to vibration Even with a SSD, you're going to want to sit the laptop on some vibration damping type material. Grab some mopads (designed for acoustically decoupling speakers) and sit it on that, ...


4

It depends on your device. Some Android phones support a headset input through the headphone jack (such as through this device [Traveler Guitar MI-10]). In that case, a simple adapter can allow you to feed an audio line in. Other devices allow what is called host support for USB. If this is the case, then you may be able to use a USB audio interface if ...


4

Focusrite Scarlett and an SM57 should be just fine. Combine it with a DAW like Ableton, Pro Tools, Cubase, Reason, Logic, etc, and you'll have a good setup. leftaroundabout mentioned many of the main reasons so I won't repeat them all, but the main reason is that USB2 is often not the bottleneck for recording applications unless you're doing extremely ...


4

I had a quick look at your device, it says the USB input is 16 bit / 48 kHz and that the device uses asynchronous sample rate conversion and 24 bit DACs @ 192 kHz. S/PDIF and Toslink are identical at the bitstream level and both are consumer variants of AES3 which supports 16 or 20 bit at 44.1 or 48 kHz. the HiFace2 says it has very good clocks, which ...


4

Here is 4 channels for $250 with mic pre amps and dedicated outputs should you need them. There are a handful of 2 channel units for under 200 here is a 4 channel right at the $200 mark. You are brushing right up on the lowest quality level at that price. You may sacrifice quite a bit of quality which may impair what ever research you are doing. Side note: ...


4

Just because someone got upvoted on reddit, that doesn't mean it isn't total and complete nonsense. OK lets get one thing clear from the start. S/PDIF and USB are simply data transports. In reality they have absolutely nothing at all to do with audio, they are just ways of getting data from one place to another. That data might be related to audio, and in ...


3

I find such arguments generally invalid. The whole point of digital is that the signal is transmitted as-is, without loss or coloration. Now, one might make an argument from the standpoint of interference (e.g., if you're running your USB cable alongside a thinly insulated power cable with a 10kw load), but such arguments are silly as well. If someone out ...


2

Maybe a Sound devices USBPre 2 ? http://www.sounddevices.com/products/usbpre2/


2

Echo make reliable interfaces and I'm gutted they've killed off much of their lineup. I'm hoping there's an Echo8 in the works.. Apogee Duet seconded. MOTU's Microbook looks promising but I'm hearing from people having trouble.


2

My answer comes years late, but this Q&A page still has high relevance. I landed here as part of my setting up my own MIDI piano. I share what worked for me on Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS "bionic": (1) Install necessary packages: sudo apt install sox \ fluidsynth \ fluid-soundfont-gm \ alsa-utils (2) Find the path where sound fonts got ...


2

I have the same USB midi keyboard and use it in both KDE and Ubuntu Studio using software MIDI routing available in the assortment of JACK packages (search for qmidiroute). I don't believe ALSA sound has any functionality for MIDI, so best to switch back and forth to use JACK for MIDI and instruments, and ALSA for playing media or hearing game sounds. USB ...


2

There is! Generically this is called an audio interface. These most commonly include ADCs/DACs and analog preamps, but an audio interface with a digital input (such as S/PDIF or optical TOSLink) will give you the "digital to digital" connectivity you're looking for.


2

Generally no, using multiple inputs shouldn't lower quality as long as the USB controllers still have sufficient bandwidth for the devices to function. If you use a hub to connect everything, then you may run in to data rate issues causing latency or outright failure, but in general, the data is digital and should get from point a to point b alright. There ...


2

Old question, I know. Use an USB isolator like this: Less than 10 dollars on aliexpress. What it does: Isolate ground (lift ground) on the USB connection with isolated DC/DC converter to eliminate ground loop/noise.


2

PlayStation Eye is one of the best and cheap recommendations. It is a microphone array with 4 microphones in row with only 35 dollars. Check amazon


2

In short, no. Your DAW will have the ability to route signals to and from the interface as is. Each channel strip in the DAW can have sends and receives, same for the monitor channel. For example if your DAW has a monitor channel that automatically receives solos, you route that monitor channel to a hardware output on the USB interface. The exact way of ...


2

Before you get too far in - make sure you are aware of the latency issues common with most android devices. This might not matter for your application but it could be a dealbreaker if you are planning on doing overdubbing etc. The first issue you will come up against with using multiple sound sources is that their clocks diverge. Even though each one is ...


2

Computer microphone inputs, both the built-in kind and the external USB kind, are designed to be used with relatively high-output electret condenser microphones. But that dynamic mic (Shure SV100) is rather low-level output and will not work very well with "computer type" microphone inputs of any kind, internal or external. Your experiment vividly ...


2

This could be a variety of things but there are a few things you can do to trouble shoot. Ensure that everything is plugged into the same outlet. In some cases crossed grounding can cause buzzing if things are plugged into various outlets. Try a different USB port on your computer. Since the interface (from my research) is buss powered the port you are ...


2

It's not the USB MIDI that is where the delay lies, it's the generation and digital to analog conversion of the sound. The amount of data that has to be processed to output a half second of audio is vastly greater than the amount of data processing needed to change a part of the display to show a character from the code page or show the mouse pointer in a ...


2

I also experienced the same problem. I am using the RODE NT-USB to record video course using my Windows PC. The microphone produces static noise all the time. BUT when I record using MacBook Air, the noise is gone. Then I found out that the problem on my Windows PC was caused because I plug in my RODE NT-USB cable into the USB 3.0 port in my PC. When I plug ...


2

There are some USB audio adapters which provide 5 or 7 channel output on 3.5mm TRS sockets. Those tend to have microphone inputs with bias voltage on them, too. Only problem is that the quality is not better than that of the average microphone input on a laptop. As a rule: anybody who has the temerity to provide a 3.5mm phone socket for a microphone will ...


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