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5

I think you've misunderstood what Frequency is, with respect to audio. Whilst 'Frequency' typically is 'how frequently something occurs', in audio it's how many times a sine-wave oscillates in a second, rather than how many things you hear in a second. eg. A standard kick-drum track at 60 BPM means you'll hear a kick-drum sound once-per-second. That actual ...


4

I want to preface this by saying that I could be totally wrong and invite anyone to correct me as this is just my best guess from one internet academic to another. But what i think is going on is this: Any time digital audio exists it is created with both a sample rate and bit depth. The sample rate controls how high a frequency is accurately produced (how ...


3

Having listened to mentioned in comments - the effect doesn't come in at the 49s mark, it's there right from the start. It is definitely a phase issue - but I'm not sure what's causing it. If you've eliminated the potential physical issues as described by Joel, than what remains is a routing issue. I'm going to take a ...


2

Imagine a professional mix engineer who has just started playing guitar asking you "How can I play guitar as well as Tom Morello or Pat Metheny?" You would probably see at least 5 - 10 years of practice in their future to be able to play guitar at a professional level, if not much more (20 years?). You are in the reverse position. Creating a professional ...


2

Most of the definition in a human voice is usually between 2kHz (attack) and 4kHz (presence/diction). If you need almost no definition bring the filter down to where most of the speech is presented, which in people is between 60Hz and 255Hz. If you low pass that low, I'd be shocked if you can hear any definition at all. If you want slightly more, bring ...


2

In response to another answer, noise should definitely not be replaced with sound. A tone generally refers to a single frequency. Sound is a general term, but would usually be used when you are talking about a single tone or collection of tones. The distinction between sound and noise depends on your perspective: there is the signal you want and the ...


2

PCM samples in a wav file are coded in 2's complement. For a N bits sample size, it means that the maximum positive sample value is 2^(N-1) - 1 and the minimum negative value is -2^(N-1). For N = 24, it leads to a maximum positive value of 2^23 - 1. The maximum positive value of a sample composed of 8 lower bits set to 1 is 2^8 - 1. So the dB FS value of ...


2

There is a website that can help - https://www.szynalski.com/tone-generator/ . As long as your computer can send audio wirelessly. You can change frequencies on the fly (and even punch in precise frequencies), select four waveforms (sine, saw, square, and triangle), and quickly double/half the frequency


1

Audacity (and probably other resampling algorithms as well) use filters that are steeper than 48 dB/octave. The difference might be audible. As the goal of filtering in resampling is to cut frequencies above the new fs/2, the filter frequency needs to be placed a bit below fs/2. Again, the difference might be audible. Concerning the sentence in your answer ...


1

Glad the OP is no longer having the problem, but I am very confident I hear the artifacts of a noise reduction plugin all over this YouTube recording. Coupled with a considerable amount of ambient room noise from the mic not being close enough to the person speaking, NR will cause exactly this kind of result when the settings are too aggressive or drastic. ...


1

FINALLY! I found this in the Audacity docs, and this part of it: Right-click once again over the required input device, click Properties then click the Advanced tab. Set Default Format to mono or stereo to match with the number of "recording channels" in Audacity's Device Toolbar or the Devices tab of Audacity Preferences (Audio I/O tab in legacy Audacity ...


1

Most likely there is a fault with your recording set up or microphone. The 'Mars effect' might actually be caused by a low frequency vibration that is getting into the mic, possibly from the computer or fan somewhere. It may cause some modulation on the signal depending on how loud it is, some structural vibrations from a desk can be quite loud. Try ...


1

ableton has a drag n drop feature that allows you to place a wave or mp3 in a midi track and get kind've interpretation of what the melody and harmony is, though you may have to use your sensibilies to extract the parts you want


1

This sounds like an audio to midi converter. By analysing the audio file, you can retrieve pitch and duration information which coincidentally is what you require to generate midi note-on and note-off messages. Something like this?


1

It's simple really; Your speakers can't reproduce a 1Hz sinewave, and if it could, you wouldn't hear it due to the limits of human hearing(plus, due to the size of the speaker cone, it would have very little energy). If your speaker could reproduce a 1Hz sinewave, you would see the speaker cone moving in and out with a one second period. If you were to play ...


1

I think perhaps this would be better/more accurate if the term noise were swapped out with the term sound instead. A tone is a noise (sound), generally associated with one particular frequency or note. A noise (sound) does not necessarily consist of just one single tone. For instance: The note, "A" is a tone which resonates @ the frequency - "440Hz". In ...


1

Nothing beats recording live from a great amp. However, even a guitar player with 20 years under his or her belt might need to use laptop setup with a DAW to put down ideas. Producers and engineers need to know how to get good tones even if they don't play instruments (of course, playing instruments helps). You didn't mention what style of guitar music (...


1

As @bart-arondson has mentioned in his comment, you should use PCM wav files to store your audio signal. Be aware that : pure tones close to half the sampling frequency might produce artefacts depending on the technology used by the TV set DAC. TV loudspeakers are not linear at frequencies above 16 kHz (approximately), and your signal might be noticeably ...


1

This is digital noise-> everything smaler than the resolution of a system is noise!


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