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6

I absolutely love psychoacoustics, it is the very reason I fell in love with sound to begin with, but frankly this is a very very hard question to answer. Psychoacoustics are rarely something really tangible like a sound or a certain technique. There are some cases where you can seriously point a finger at it, like the deep sine-wave in Irrèversible, the ...


5

Having worked on a project mixed in Dolby Atmos, here’s my 2 cents for what it’s worth. And no, I don’t work for Dolby. First, please go give Atmos a listen before you pass judgement. It is quite a promising and exciting technology, designed not to become obsolete in the next few years. While it does provide the opportunity to use the surrounds and ceiling ...


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The biggest thing is going to be careful EQing and using microphones as close to the actor's mouthes and as directional as possible. Feedback occurs when the amount of amplification applied to the microphone signal becomes enough that the background noise that the microphone picks up from the speaker is louder than the signal it is amplifying, thus forming ...


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AS to source material: As of 2009, the most common acquisition medium for digitally projected features is 35 mm film scanned and processed at 2K (2048×1080) or 4K (4096×2160) via digital intermediate. Most digital features to date have been shot at 1920×1080 HD resolution using cameras such as the Sony CineAlta, Panavision Genesis, or Thomson ...


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+1 to @Christian's answer. Just to build on it, it is important to remember that there are two areas of 'psycho-acoustics' in this context; things that will consciously affect the audience, and those effects which subconsciously effect the audience. Using 'conscious' affects on an audience is all to do with sound-association, where certain sounds draw ...


3

Musical theatre, more often than not, uses head-worn lavalier microphones that are positioned very close to the mouth. This gives a much greater signal-to-noise ratio for the Front-of-House mixer to work with. These mics are often flesh-coloured so that they are almost impossible to see. Lavalier mounting in musical theatre is a craft that requires an ...


2

For re-mounts and tours (same company) I charge 50% of the original fee. If another theatre wants to buy the sound design for their production, I negotiate by taking their venue size and multiplying it by the length of their run. I compare it to the same figure from the original production then calculate the percent difference, and apply it to the fee. It ...


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Hey Jeremy, You might want to check out this post about sound illusions. http://listverse.com/2008/02/29/top-10-incredible-sound-illusions/ I'm not sure how you would implement any of these in a theatrical setting, but they might give you some inspiration. Also following on from Mark's post, I read somewhere that the resonant frequency of the eyeball ...


2

All of my stem submasters run Limiters - something quick-response, transparent, and can take a beating like Maxim or L2007. Maximizers like the L1 or MV2 are too colorized for my liking and they let too much through. And then a run a PT MasterFader (but with NO limiters) just to monitor meters on the overall stem summing - because you can have no peaking ...


2

My son used MultiPlay for a show last year. He is a teacher. He had his students run the program for cueing through the show. It worked really well. It's Windows only. http://www.da-share.com/software/multiplay/ MultiPlay is a Windows based program designed to play audio cues for theatre or corporate use. It is free to use in both amateur and commercial ...


2

If you can get access to mac just use Qlab! It works great and for stereo playback, which I'm guessing is what you're looking for, it's totally free...


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Without knowing the context or hearing your director's request, my thought is that he's looking for an emotional sound that will supplement the practical sound of the body hitting the floor, ie. a "stinger" or something that will provoke a reaction from the audience. Is that what the director is getting at? Or is the sound supposed to be some other type of ...


1

AJ is correct on all accounts. There are a couple more things I'd like to add: speaker placement, aim, and signal route. Since you have an arena theater setup, think about where to put your speakers, where to aim them, and what signals you want to route to them. As best as you can, route voices only to speakers facing away from the arena stage. Route ...


1

I appreciate that this is an old thread, but for others who may read it I can add a bit more about Multiplay. It's relatively easy to use and, more importantly from a school context, requires no installation. It can even be run from a memory stick which also includes the audio files (although you have to be careful with file paths if you do that). School ...


1

https://github.com/sam0737/ShowCueWeb I was looking for the same thing for my one-off show. Without a satisfactory solution, so I made one - pure HTML5/JS/AudioContext and purely client side. Not only controlling audio but also video/images as well. Licensed in MIT, forking is welcome. I hope you will find it useful.


1

This a sound design forum, concerning the edit and mix of sound/music in sync to picture or images. Your question, although stated clearly is not exactly a topic of interest to most users. Have you considered contacting the website of your setup/brand? happy new year


1

Am I entitled to credit or compensation? If you have copyright for these particular sounds, then using the sounds without your permission is technically a copyright infringement. However, whether you want to go court is another topic, more likely the infringement that bothers you can be solved simply by negotiating. If you've signed a contract where you've ...


1

I agree with FAO that relying on a limiter on the master bus is largely a music mixing practice that has little applicability to film mixing. For a really good overview of calibration of monitor levels and how level management is being approached in the broadcast industry, go see ATSC.org web site and check out their paper on ATSC Recommended Practice: ...


1

Hei Peter one of the problems when working digitally is that the dbFs scale will give you no reference about how loud a sound is and if your signal is too hot, clipping, it will not be compressed and distorted in a harmonically way,like it would happen on tape, but because you are running out of 0 and 1 to process the signal it will sound very ugly. Long ...


1

Hi Greg Stereo sound like we know from music was never used in cinema. There are lots of article if you search in books or google, I can explain you the main facts: In the past, the first audio format was mono with one speaker in the middle of the screen. This format is still the most important channel if you imagine the situation of a cinema. Wherever you ...


1

not directly related to comfort levels, but you can also play with absence of sound. for example- if you play a recording of air conditioning, or similar at a low level for most of the show to establish the noise floor, and suddenly cut it out at some point then the new much quieter noise floor becomes more intense.


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I'm not sure if this is technically psychoacoustics as it's more about how the body reacts to sound physiologically than our perception of sound. But as we are physical beings, we also resonate when subjected to sound waves of the right frequencies. Much of it is subsonic - below the frequency of human hearing. Head: about 25hz Eyeball: ...


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Metrics are important here. Go back and look at how many hours you put into the project, then put a value on those hours. The total is what you want to make back to "break even". Indie Feature Production and Post Production Audio Budgets ^ The answers contained here are very helpful when it comes to pricing your hours for small projects. Once you've done ...


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If you end up using Qlab, and want to ad an interactive element to your show, try an ICubeX digitizer and some sensors: http://infusionsystems.com/catalog/info_pages.php?pages_id=237 It might help you find something new and interesting to do with sound design.


1

Sounds interesting! I would definitely agree with narrowing the stereo field. When i'm mixing indoor scenes i usually have my atmos panned to 50 at the widest, with at least one of my layers close to centre. Not that there's any rule, i just like the way this contrasts with exterior scenes. I wouldn't recommend rolling off any lows. The acoustic treatment ...


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