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5

I think you've misunderstood what Frequency is, with respect to audio. Whilst 'Frequency' typically is 'how frequently something occurs', in audio it's how many times a sine-wave oscillates in a second, rather than how many things you hear in a second. eg. A standard kick-drum track at 60 BPM means you'll hear a kick-drum sound once-per-second. That actual ...


5

It's a little tricky, but in Audacity you can use the "Sliding Time Scale / Pitch Shift" effect (in the Effect menu).


5

This is a matter of taste more than a technical issue, so I'll be using terms like "groove" and "feel" rather than more quantifiable criteria. It comes down to making it seem natural instead of jarring. Since you mention club DJs, I presume you mean "in front of dancers," and the human body is going to move differently at 90bpm than it is at 130. A simple ...


4

I don't know about free or open source. Ableton does this. It usually works or you can adjust the result of the algorithm's guess fairly easily. It was a pioneer in this in the last decade or so, but most major DAWs now have some of this functionality.


3

I created a small program in Python that does beat alignment. You may want to take a look: https://github.com/smiszym/tempoligner It's not perfect; probably usable just for simple cases. It doesn't do beat detection - you need to mark beats manually in Audacity. Yet it's free, easy to use and worked for my needs.


3

Broadly speaking, the technology you're looking for is called "timestretching" and specifically something that can stretch time to a musical time grid. Timestretching usually connotes changing time while making an attempt to preserve pitch and texture; that is to say, the audio doesn't pitch up and down as it's sped or slowed. The go-to answer for this is ...


3

Depends... If it's a track played by humans then unless they played to a click then it's unlikely the BPM is consistent because people will fluctuate tempo. Obviously the best will fluctuate only microscopically but fluctuate all the same. However it's electronic then the BPM is (likely) to be consistent. Therefore what happens isn't that it suddenly goes ...


3

If the tempo is ragged in each track, it's a much bigger job than if the tempo is even but simply different. I'll assume the second. There may be software that can help automate this, but here's how I'd approach this using (free) Audacity. The concept is simple and would apply to any program capable of the same tricks. Load each instrument to a different ...


2

If you are going to be using them to create a tempo detection program and need something constant Audacity has a great tool for creating metronome tracks. If you haven't already download and install Audacity from http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ Open Audacity Navigate to the menu Generate > Click Track Choose the tempo and other various setting you wish ...


2

This can be done easily in FL studio as well. not open source but they have demo versions of their software that includes the time stretching feature. Both FL studio and Logic do this very nicely with different types of beat-matching to choose from --Options to change pitch or not when time stretching etc.


2

I think this little project going to be dependent on your desire as well as budget. You probably already know this. Getting the audio into digital format isn't all that difficult. There are a lot of different turntables which automatically do this for you now (some doing direct Vinyl to SD card MP3 conversions). Else, you can always just run Audacity on ...


2

Pro Tools has some of the best time-stretching algorithms. Check out Elastic Audio.


2

Firstly it's nice to see someone making use of RS5000! Sadly, though, it works in the same way as most samplers in that it achieves the pitch changes simply by playing back the sample data at different speeds. Within Reaper you could do the work using ReaPitch which would also allow you to do formant correction to compensate for the vocal sounding ...


2

There are some well hidden impractical default MIDI import options in Cubase's preferences that prevent this. Here is how to fix it: Go into Cubase's preferences window and go to MIDI -> MIDI File Find the option that says Import to Left Locator make sure it is checked Find the option that says Ignore Master Track Events on Merge is unchecked. Now you can ...


2

Tempo can be an illusion. I suspect what is happening is that your loop sounds great at 191 (it was written that way) but at 96, different things stick out. Things that sounded good with speed might seem to drag, because the swing or pulse was never meant to be the focus, and now those things are made much more obvious. I'm just sort of shooting in the ...


2

You can do this by selecting from the top menu Edit->Tempo->Show Tempo List, and then click on the + symbol to add a new tempo change. The default starting point will be the location of your time bar, though you can change that and the expected tempo by double clicking on the values that appear listed in the Tempo List window.


1

Both MIDI and .wav audio have its limitations in absolute time. For .wav files, this is usually quite small. If the sample rate is 44,100 kHz, you have enough time resolution to control your note length to 1/44100th of a second or 1/44.1ms. If you need even more resolution, you can increase the sample rate to 48kHz, 96kHz, or even 192kHz if your audio ...


1

It's simple really; Your speakers can't reproduce a 1Hz sinewave, and if it could, you wouldn't hear it due to the limits of human hearing(plus, due to the size of the speaker cone, it would have very little energy). If your speaker could reproduce a 1Hz sinewave, you would see the speaker cone moving in and out with a one second period. If you were to play ...


1

You can use Sony - Sound Forge for precise pitch-shifting with curves if your problem is a problem with the tape recording speed. To note that pitch-shifting if no time-stretch is added to it doesn't significantly alter your original sound quality it will only change the tone. Steinberg - Cubase's tool seems pretty accurate too. Also, Ableton - Live and ...


1

A drop from 191 to 96 is quite drastic but a drop from 191 to 115 is also quite dramatic. Is there an absolute reason you want the interlude to be exactly half tempo? If not you should follow your ear and go with 115 if you like the way the drum loop sounds at that tempo. A plan is great to get started on a track but dont be afraid to let the music go ...


1

I would never use apps for this, I'd count the bars before using an app. I use Rane's Scratch Live. It has some pretty accurate BPM detection. There are other good ones out there though. I have a BPM display built into my mixer actually, but I never use it TBH. What I would do: If you're going to play each track to get a sample, then you may as well run ...


1

Just made some down and dirty heart monitor beeps for a scene. The main character is in a hospital bed and has just come out of a coma. I used a couple instances of Structure, a single trigger for each that I region-looped, and then tempo-mapped subtle heart rate changes through the scene based on her reactions. Then re-recorded the output of each Structure ...


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