7

I'm not a great authority on this, but i'll jump in anyway because you seem keen to get an answer: 79 dB spl seems to be the standard calibration for TV mixes. Commercials, from what i hear, tend to be pushed louder by ad agency execs who want their ad to thump people in the face, but it sounds like you're mixing a program so you should mix to standard spec ...


6

First off this 79 figure is based on room size. Look for the ATSC 85 document to verify. It's typical to mix to 79 for TV and 82 to 85 for film. Theatrical get's sometimes 85 up on LCR and 82 on Ls Rs. You need to take a room size measurement then using the figures in the doc above, and an SPL meter and the blue sky test tones (or pink limited mono wav ...


6

The basics are thus: "What are the specifications of the broadcaster you're delivering to?" You're asking us to distill a very complex process down into a "paint by numbers" process. If it were that easy, there'd be a manual that anyone could follow. I'm not trying to be mean by saying this, only trying to give you an idea of the scope of the question you'...


3

Yes, Paula Fairfield is really a great talent. She brings that stuff to life so well. They do a great justice to the books for the readers, while still keeping it interesting and balanced.


2

No matter what you decide to do, always sum your mix to mono and check it, as many broadcasts and/or TV sets (not to mention some laptops) still come through in mono. ORTF takes advantage of time differences between the capsules to create a stereo image, which works great in stereo playback but can cause phase issues when summed mono. One possibility is to ...


2

There's this one library called big whoosh. Can't remember if that one is more over the top or not, so look for some samples to listen to first. It takes a bit more effort, but for more "tame" whooshes I've often had luck with arrow whiz bys and whooshes intended for fight sounds. Sometimes you want to pitch them down a touch and give them a little verb. You ...


2

Hi :) Have a look on Boom Library Cinematic Trailers Designed here.


2

I haven't had an opportunity to watch it yet, however I do personally know some of the sound crew and have heard it's a very great-sounding show - and I imagine that from seeing hat's it's aesthetic is like, it is a highly-demanding show as far as sound. The earlier seasons were helmed by Peter Brown over at Soundelux, which they recently garnered a Golden ...


2

The harshness of the compression is similar to API's boxes. It might be one, although I never can remember the number of model. The cool "damaged" sound are most certainly an artifact from (very likely Cedar) noise-reduction, EQ, and probably a mild distorsion to make it pop in the trailer. It's pretty safe to say it will sound different in the final film. ...


1

An Optical to RCA adapter will work fine. There will not be any noticeable latency. Just make sure your amplifier takes 1/4" or RCA input.


1

You have a few different options. You can use some gates on the lapel mics and set the threshold high enough to cut the TV bleedover, but not the character dialogue. This has the downside of potentially sounding unnatural, and you'll have to tune the attack and decay of the gates to get the speech to not sound choppy as it cuts in and out. If the TV sound ...


1

Look up Ebu R-128 you need to be using the 'LUFS' scale for delivery. Different normalizations are required depending what continent you're on.


1

Hire a composer to write music that fits. The extra polish that results can count for a lot.


1

End it with someone talking example: commercial starts -> music plays -> commercial ends -> "Jai jian real estate, because home is where the heart is" :P


1

In pro tools you can do a strip silence. Or that might not be it? First thing i thought of


1

Steve is correct in that LeqA is effectively an RMS style measurement. The main difference is that the measurement is weighted by an EQ curve (which is one of the reasons why there can be a difference between the LeqA and actual RMS measurement). Yes, you're going to need more compression to meet the necessary levels. Most television dialog sits in that -26 ...


1

I'm sure some more experience mixers can chime in, as I'm not a mixer by trade so I don't know all of the in's and outs. Although, from my somewhat limited experience, the LEQ(a) is effectively an RMS-type (averaged) measurement of sound energy. Meaning that it stands to reason in my mind that based upon what you've said, upward compression is the only ...


1

Check it out! An article about Laughman, Bickelhaupt. Crazy interesting! http://nymag.com/arts/tv/features/laughtracks-2011-12/


1

All of these options others have listed here are great. Just wanted to add that iZotope's Insight plugin is also excellent for monitoring True Peak loudness in accordance with EU broadcast standards. It's expensive, but it's also a pretty kickass metering plugin in general, it's frequency analysis is fantastic as well.


1

You really can't mix anything on headphones or TV accurately, its impossible!Totally impossible! Proof, take a graphic analyzer and check the wave dynamic of each TV & headphone & computer monitor's sound response output, and you will see a hundred different patterns on your hundred different TV's headphones etc., The EQ levels are all over the place!...


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