14

While I haven't heard the second season of the show, I agree with Gary on this. As a re-recording mixer, I have heard plenty of my shows degrade once on air. One of the biggest things we are faced with now is the use of expanders by the networks. In a misguided attempt to compete with the volume levels of commercials, broadcasters are resorting to ...


11

quick fix to deal with it in post and save yourself time on the tweaking: duplicate the track, find the worst moment of sibilance and set your de-esser's settings to control that particular instance (you can do this RTAS or Audio suite)...on the duplicated track of course. once that's done, go through and crossfade/mix between the processed and unprocessed ...


7

I'm not a great authority on this, but i'll jump in anyway because you seem keen to get an answer: 79 dB spl seems to be the standard calibration for TV mixes. Commercials, from what i hear, tend to be pushed louder by ad agency execs who want their ad to thump people in the face, but it sounds like you're mixing a program so you should mix to standard spec ...


6

First off this 79 figure is based on room size. Look for the ATSC 85 document to verify. It's typical to mix to 79 for TV and 82 to 85 for film. Theatrical get's sometimes 85 up on LCR and 82 on Ls Rs. You need to take a room size measurement then using the figures in the doc above, and an SPL meter and the blue sky test tones (or pink limited mono wav ...


6

The basics are thus: "What are the specifications of the broadcaster you're delivering to?" You're asking us to distill a very complex process down into a "paint by numbers" process. If it were that easy, there'd be a manual that anyone could follow. I'm not trying to be mean by saying this, only trying to give you an idea of the scope of the question you'...


5

To add mystery to your quest , once the laugh man has come and gone and the mix is done .. the tone guy is called in. He too comes with a box BUT his is filled with tone. Generally they have various tones in their box and skillfully applies his expertize to the master. and just like that before your can say dolby on ,, he is gone !


5

So you need to fit the television sound in with the location recordings? Have you tried worldizing it? Recording it through a television with the same Neumann should help. Perhaps go back to the same space where you shot the scene and record it there. Be sure to do several recordings from different distances if you get the opportunity.


3

Yes, Paula Fairfield is really a great talent. She brings that stuff to life so well. They do a great justice to the books for the readers, while still keeping it interesting and balanced.


2

I have run comparison tests of all the key players in the market. For me the best, and most expensive, is the TC Electronic LM5D. I love the Radar display and the 3 measurement criteria are all displayed. If that is outside you price range then the Nugen Audio VIS-LM gets my vote, again displays all the data, excellent scrolling history display. However if ...


2

In my experience in dealing with this often, a TV feed is treated as being part of Hard FX and not BGz. So in that regard usually we always build from the ground up, then comp it down into 1 or two tracks, even for military/riot/crime scene stuff. On some occasions, shows have played a visual on a TV in which they obtained permission to use the footage, ...


2

I don't know the specifics of the production, but mic selection is important. Different mics treat different voices differently. Doesnt sound like you have much time for mic selection tests, but i'd start there. Can you set up multiple mics and pick the best?


2

I've been using the Nugen VIS-Lm for a while, and it seems fairly solid, and bang on in terms of QC. Settings for EBU, ATSC and ITU 1770.


2

If you can't go the projector route, I've seen an LCD encased in plexiglass, attached to a lazy susan. They didn't have to worry about dust in the TV or a wild prop ricocheting off the screen. It kept the room quiet, and they could position it to be viewable from anywhere. Quite clever really.


2

The very best solution would be to use a video projector, in another room, isolated from the foley stage.


2

No matter what you decide to do, always sum your mix to mono and check it, as many broadcasts and/or TV sets (not to mention some laptops) still come through in mono. ORTF takes advantage of time differences between the capsules to create a stereo image, which works great in stereo playback but can cause phase issues when summed mono. One possibility is to ...


2

Hi :) Have a look on Boom Library Cinematic Trailers Designed here.


2

There's this one library called big whoosh. Can't remember if that one is more over the top or not, so look for some samples to listen to first. It takes a bit more effort, but for more "tame" whooshes I've often had luck with arrow whiz bys and whooshes intended for fight sounds. Sometimes you want to pitch them down a touch and give them a little verb. You ...


2

I haven't had an opportunity to watch it yet, however I do personally know some of the sound crew and have heard it's a very great-sounding show - and I imagine that from seeing hat's it's aesthetic is like, it is a highly-demanding show as far as sound. The earlier seasons were helmed by Peter Brown over at Soundelux, which they recently garnered a Golden ...


2

The harshness of the compression is similar to API's boxes. It might be one, although I never can remember the number of model. The cool "damaged" sound are most certainly an artifact from (very likely Cedar) noise-reduction, EQ, and probably a mild distorsion to make it pop in the trailer. It's pretty safe to say it will sound different in the final film. ...


1

I worked on a 45 minute primetime drama for awhile. Usually the cycle was a week for a crew of about 5-6 like yours. 2 days is unreasonable unless they are willing to pay through the nose, or want a bad sounding track without foley and ADR. It was quite a grind, but fun and like completing a half a movie in a week. I learned a lot. It broke out roughly ...


1

I'm assuming that you mean post production sound turnaround for TV, in which case Primetime scripted dramas of 45 min in length have about a 5-6 day sound editorial turnaround (6 days assuming you're working on a Saturday). Followed up by 2 days of stage time for the mix (about 8-10 hours per day, maybe up to 12 hours per day). I know of at least two shows ...


1

Check it out! An article about Laughman, Bickelhaupt. Crazy interesting! http://nymag.com/arts/tv/features/laughtracks-2011-12/


1

I ditched all ideas of TV's in my studio pretty much the same day I tried them. CRT:s was sending massive interferences to the mikes, the plasmas I've seen was buzzing, and the LCD:s had, for some reason, a lot of delay. I use LCD-monitors in my studio for all monitoring, be it the two from the computer or through the Video Out from my Matrox-card via a VGA ...


1

Wild guess, but can you take an impulse response of the room in question, then pass your audio through Altiverb (using that impulse response), through a very good monitor speaker, and then back into your Neumann at the 3m distance? That would seem to get you pretty close (at least in my head.)


1

Anyone else watched Episode 07 yet? it seems those bugs, although still present, have been pushed back to a more appropriate level and especially in INT scenes haha, maybe they read this thread? anyway i think it works better because of it, they really pulled me out of the story, the way they instantly dropped out when someone spoke then popped back in ...


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