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12

We (I work at a premium car manufacturer, in development) always use black or grey Tesa Gaffer tape, the type that's almost fabric-like, rather than plasticy, with lots of fibers in both directions. It doesn't tear off the paint, holds very well (I tested it up to 280 km/h, taping mics to the underside of cars etc) and leaves little to no residue. If it ...


6

Great question! It's encouraging to see that sound people are still thinking outside the "plug ins" box. The concept of using outboard gear in an attempt to alter your source material is certainly worth pursuing, and what you would capture might indeed be something quite special and unique. I wholeheartedly recommend that you undertake the effort! Bear in ...


4

It seems to me that a good choice would be a Nagra tape recorder, which was a recorder very much used starting in the 1950's until digital recording took over in the 1980's and 1990's. While this technology would be significantly better than the optical soundtrack you'd find in the 1930's, I think it would be a pretty flexible option. Since Nagras are ...


3

Not really an answer, but a bit long for comments… To echo Dave's sentiment; as owner of many old reel-reel machines, gathering dust in a junk room I would heartily agree. Keep them for if you ever need to rescue something. I have tape baking facilities for that eventuality, which have seen occasional yet important use over the years. For all other ...


2

Audio tape speeds are measured in ips (inches per second) or in cm/s (centimeters per second), not RPM (i.e. there is no typical/common RPM). The actual RPM of the reels changes with the amount of tape. The speed of the tape is not controlled by the reel motors them selves, but rather the capstan motor, which then ensures a constant speed (and typically the ...


2

have you tried eq + izotope vynil?


2

You could record your audio to a cassette tape, wrinkle it, and grab the playback audio. Nothing beats the real thing ;)


2

The more important question here is why are you not doing this is what ever software you are using? But in response to the question at hand... As for tape decks the older Tascam 8 track and 2 track machines (at least the ones I have) do have a speed control but it is in the form of a pitch + or - selector with no units. There is no direct indication of ...


2

AFAIK (well it's not even a guess, but almost a certainty), VCR does not do the kind of lo-fi that you're looking for. It's too hi-tech and you can see the specs to verify that. The "real" choice (without stretching to carving your own record) for old audio quality would be a reel to reel tape recorder or (but you may lose quality in this) a cassette ...


2

I happen to still own my Tascam 1/2 inch 8 track tape deck and I will warn you DONT BUY ONE while recording on tape seems like a "fun" idea its actually a nightmare. Ill give you a few reasons why (then ill get to adding analog to the chain). Tape is expensive: 8 Track tape is not made in the quantity it used to be made in and does not last for ever it ...


1

Wav files are better quality but unfortunately converting a compressed .mp3 to a .wav doesn't improve quality. I would interpret the "blanket" over the voice to sound like it's muffled which means the high-mid to highs may be lost but you can try to balance it out by lowering the low as well as raising the higher frequencies. Also using a limiter or ...


1

If the break is at the beginning (or end) it might be easier to simply discard the short piece and attach the tape to the nearest hub. Some people over at TaperSection.com have shown how to do it with old cassette splicing tape but then carefully trimming the excess (because cassette tape is wider than DAT tape). But unless you have some current good (i.e....


1

Cut properly and under magnetic tape (non magnetic area). You can stick with transparent thin tape. We used to do this with audio and video tapes.


1

I've never heard of the 'sticky tape' phenomenon affecting anything other than specific Ampex 456 tape made during the 80s… & boy, have I baked some of those over the years ;-) Old cassettes may shed a little, but I don't think they should be sticky. I'd play one track at a time & clean the heads before each track. Unless your heads are so far out ...


1

I play all kinds of tapes from the 70-90 no issues here. I think they will still work flawlessly. Tapes are build like tanks :) You definetely won't rip them off at the end. I tried to rip one by Hand. No chance.


1

Well, derjur beat me to it as I was going to suggest doing it for real as well! Cassette players are cheap on eBay, I got one last year for futzing things and it was about £9. Tapes are cheap too as no one wants them anymore!


1

might also consider sourcing some old film sound that has what you are going for and using a match eq function with something like ozone5.


1

All of these are excellent suggestions, but if I make one more relating to workflow... Whatever method you use (re-record, pass through old analog gear, amps, plug in chain, etc), try doing a pass where you push that to it's ultimate limit... make it the grungiest, nastiest, ugliest version of that particular chain. Now bring that back in WITH the original ...


1

Avoid the crap at all cost, if you can't get out of it, outsource the da88 transfer. The transfer facility will then have the issues with creating tapes that work, finding stock that isn't crap and dealing with any re-transfer issues. Still I'd try my hardest to avoid it!


1

I know of a number of companies which still have DA88 format on their delivery specs but with some when you look at the small print it is possible to deliver files instead. So I would agree with Shaun go back and check. Although it is possible to buy cheap secondhand DA88s, if they haven't been properly maintained there is a good chance that tapes recorded ...


1

Is it possible they've just never updated their delivery docs? I'd give them a ring and confirm that that's the only format they'll accept, because it seems odd to me. In general, I'd avoid investing in any equipment that's reached the end of it's life cycle. DA-88 won't be making a comeback.


1

An option would be suction cups, the ones with levers to create the vacuum. I have found them in large box home stores such as Home Depot and also in hardware stores such as Northern Tools or Harbor Freight. If you elect to use a suction cup, be sure the paint is clean. Spray a bit of water on the surface to give the suction cup a bit more grip. I have ...


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