9

Very good question. I found nothing about it in the manuals. It seems I'm missing some knowledge that the creators of FM8 and Ableton's Operator share and use. So, my question is how do synth makers control the modulator amplitude and how does the interface of the synth and the controls from 0 to 100 change the modulator amplitude in the background? You ...


8

The basic idea The characteristic "wobble" bass popular in mid-late 2000s dubstep is frequently (but not always) created by sweeping a lowpass filter over a harmonically-rich sound of some kind, usually some oscillators. The filter cuts out the higher harmonics, creating an effect similar to closing your lips while saying "ahhhhh. By moving the filter ...


7

Attack (A): the time it will take to reach its maximum level after note is triggered Decay (D): the time it will take to drop to the sustain level after the initial rise Sustain (S): the level that the envelope will remain at until the key is released Release (R): the time it will take to reach zero after the key is released The time ranges is dependent ...


7

There's really no such thing as MIDI Synthesis. Synthesis is the process by which sounds are 'synthesised' using various modulation and generation techniques. MIDI is the "Musical Instrument Digital Interface" and is a protocol by which electronic music instruments can pass control and note information. MIDI is only interested in sending and receiving ...


6

The Sound on Sound series of articles Synth Secrets provides a step-by-step approach for modeling range of instruments using analog techniques. Music, Physics and Engineering by H. Olsen provides examples of mechanical and electrical analogues to various instruments, and is in general a useful, if dated, reference. These examples are more directly useful ...


5

Sweden's power grid runs at 220v if I am not mistaken. Japan runs at 100v. Most modern electronics are capable of dealing with the range. Some older appliances are not. Check that the label near the keyboard's power cord shows 100-240v and 50-60 Hz. If it does not, you will need a "step-down transformer" (also called a converter). If it does, all you ...


5

First, the D-20 isn't a piano. It is a synthesizer, which is a type of instrument that allows you to create a wide variety of sounds. The good news is that the D-20 was intended for creating realistic instrument sounds rather than just sci-fi bleeps and bloops. The bad news is that by 2013 standards, the D-20 is going to sound a lot less realistic than ...


5

Warning: this is perhaps not the answer you are looking for :) You have already got enough gear. What you really need is time, patience, perseverance. Experiment with what you already have, whatever it is that you own, use your imagination and creativity. A typical style of music was not only 'invented' because of the sound or purpose of the gear; it was ...


5

Voices are separate oscillators, chorus is merely a delay-based effect. Usually the number of voices in a synth actually refers to the number of oscillator groups. For example, an analog synth with "six voices, each with two oscillators" means that you can separately program two different oscillator programs (e.g., wave shape, frequency, etc.), and then ...


5

Generally, you want to conceptualize this based on the reality of the situation you are trying to re-create. Firstly, shopping malls usually have crappy speakers, so imagine your sound being played through crappy speakers in a very large space, possibly with a fairly lengthy reverb time. Also, the speakers are often quite distant, so the ratio of direct ...


4

While you could create a wobble in Audacity, you might go insane trying. Instead, download pure data, and work through the tutorials. You don't need to get into much advanced stuff, just learn how to create an OSC~ and a DAC~ and a bit on filtering and FM. Then you can hook up as many oscillators as you want and modulate them and the filters. That's pretty ...


4

Try contacting Roland or your official Roland Service Center first. Korg and Yamaha both have reputations for helping out with their products even when they are long out of warranty. Roland doesn't have that reputation as much, but you should still start by asking them. If you can't get Roland to supply you with a chip, then look for forums where people who ...


4

The classical acid sound comes from the TB-303 Synthesizer. The effect is generated by using high amounts of resonance on its 4-pole 24 dB/Octave Filter. Then the filter gets modulated via an envelope. (Decaying motion in most parts) The Acid sound you here in this intro is a combination of a minimoog like bass synth and a "acid" TB-303-like fx/melody synth....


4

The entire clip you provided is performed on a synthesizer which begins with a bowed cello like setting in the lower register accenting the first beat while a pizzicato double bass plays the next 7 beats. This repeats, so by the 3rd time the cello like instrument sounds at 0:15 a melodic element is introduced which might be best described as a combination of ...


4

There are patch books out there that describe how to approximate various instruments and sound effects with a subtractive synth. Your best bet is probably to scour eBay for a few titles and see if they are close enough to what you are looking for. The Synth Secrets series that Dave mentions is the way to go if you want to build up your own patches from ...


4

The only thing that really stands out to me about your setup is the lack of FX. You can safely disregard any effects built in to your mixer. There are a ton of great rack units out there from the '90s that can be found for peanuts on eBay and your local version of Craigslist. Start with Alesis - take a look at the Wedge, QuadraVerb, MidiVerb and Ineko/Akira....


4

Balancing! All your lines should be balanced. What this does it splits the signal in two and flips one half of it. Then the side that is flipped is flipped back at the end, and added to the first one, therefore cancelling the noise induced in the cable out. You need a DI box, especially since your cables are long and then something to unbalance the signal at ...


4

What you describe sounds like Buss/Master/Group Compression gone wrong. This effect sometimes appears when you have a compressor set to affect both the bass and the lead (via any of the Buss/Master/Group) When the bass hits the compressor the really lows(which consume a lot of space) instantly bring the threshold down and lower the volume of each other ...


3

For anyone who wants to make this sound in MASSIVE it's pretty simple. You only need one Oscillator on. Select Squ-Sw 1 and pull the WT-position all the way to the right so you only get a normal saw sound. Pull the F2 switch all the way up. At this point you wont hear any sound. On "filter 1" select Acid. Pull the resonance to the top. Take envelope 1 and ...


3

The TB 303 obsentiably has a "square" and a "saw" wave, but neither one of them are particularly square or saw like--especially the square!. Your best bet is to find a sample of an original TB 303 (or one of the true clones) with the filter fully open and no resonance. Play around with a 3 pole or 4 pole filter. The TB-303 has a very messed up 4 pole ...


3

Sounds like a pretty standard dubstep bass lead. Those are usually done by feeding a fundamental wave (usually a square wave) through a ring modulator, and playing with cutoff, resonance, and square wave duty cycle to make the swoopy noises.


3

Definition of vibrato I'm using is a periodic change in the pitch of a note. What happens when a musical note consisting of a multiple of pure tones is subject to vibrato? I'm answering this way because the perceptual effect of what happens may vary between different listeners. Listener 'A' may hear something gliding back and forth whereas Listener 'B' may ...


3

Self-oscilation only works for analogue gear (because of the noise flow and constant active OSCs). Digital plug-ins can't self oscillate. But some programmers made algorithms that "imitate" self-oscillation to a certain degree. In NI Massive you can "imitate" self-osculation if you feed a bit to noise from the noise generator into the filter with a cranked ...


3

I actually spent some time recording the ADS+R envelopes in Massive to figure out what the x axis would be. Anyone who spends time messing around with Massive would soon figure out that the graph is not to scale which can definitely be a bit confusing if you're new to envelopes. But i was interested in the possible values so i timed the knobs out in ...


3

FM8 mirrors the DX7 implementation which uses a 0-99 value to represent modulation index of 0 to 14. So, an output level of '85' corresponds to an index of 4.


3

All I know is it seems to be a reference to french house, the "french touch," which is a filtered-disco sound. Expect a prominent, musical filter, but I am not an expert on filter design so I can't separate out the marketing angle from the reality of what you will get. Examples of the kind of music being referenced: http://thesearepowerfulhours.com/...


3

With a single MIDI input port, the 44VSL can handle only one device. Nowadays, it is likely that a keyboard has built-in USB. If not, you can use a USB/MIDI interface cable to get a second MIDI IN.


3

Can you assign a parameter in NI's Massive to the MIDI Pitch bend wheel? No, I don't think you can, Pitch Bend and Aftertouch have dedicated controllers(They aren't in the standard MIDI CC# 1-127 which Massive sees) - Meaning they won't show up in the list of CC#s in Massive. You may be able to do it with MIDI monitoring/editing software.


3

You need to understand sound sources (oscillators, noise generators, and samples), modulation (LFO in particular), sound shaping (envelopes), and then signal processing (read: math and audio physics). And honestly I'm being really high level here. There are a million details within each thing I mentioned. Its not really difficult, but I think it does ...


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