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4

There are any number of things that could be contributing to it, but the most likely culprit is the frame rate...24 is a freakin' minefield! The biggest issue with 24fps, is that there are multiple formats: true 24, 24P, 24PsF, and 23.976 (sometimes abbreviated as 23.98). It's important to note that these are all slightly different...they are not ...


4

ASSUMING (and this could be a large assumption) that the Camera and Production audio have matching TimeCode and that the editor hasn't stripped it out in the AVID, you can use the Field Recorder functions of PT using match to Time Code only... You may end up with some clips that have the same timecode but it should shave hours off your workflow. Basically ...


3

You might have a speed problem. Is this PAL or NTSC? If it's too fast try resampling at 46034 Hz. If too slow, resample at 50000 Hz. Sync with plosives like P or B, also M's will work. You should not have to re-sync each word.


3

Is there guide audio? The animators "should" have had scratch dialogue in order for them to draw the lip movement. I'm not totally sure of your workflow, but sync has to be achieved when you're recording your actors. You can cut and paste and squeeze and stretch dialogue all you want, but if you process it too much, it'll just sound wrong. If there is a ...


3

Confirm that your session is in the right frame rate (Session Setup window). Also make sure that you don't have any pull-up or pull down enabled (same window); you only need to do that if you're bouncing to a different frame rate than your session.


3

A bit of a kludge but may solve your problem. Use a 2nd wireless mic that goes directly to your Canon HF10 camcorder as described here: http://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/canon-vixa-hf-10/using-wireless-microphone-system/ Looks to be about $250.


3

Another thing you could do with the tools you have: Export the raw footage as a sound file, sync in audacity, then edit. You'll have less cuts to contend with, and everything will be in sync BEFORE you start editing. Failing that, PC editing options are slim, but I have found the Sony Vegas family to be reasonably priced (look at vegas studio vs vegas pro) ...


3

Do expect drift between non-timecode-locked equipment. This is common. One way to get around it is to feed the sound from your recorder back into the camera, monitor via the camera's audio/headphones out, then use the sound from camera in your edit. Lots of cables, but fewer posts on forums later if you don't run across other complications. Sync drift can ...


3

Unless the recording devices are locked to each other or a common masterclock like a blackburst generator the devices will drift over time. The best thing to do is probably slice and readjust as needed, whether thats by song or a really tiny adjustment part way through each song. You could try a slight time stretch but that will probably introduce more ...


2

I think you've done the best you could have in the situation...probably exactly what I would have done as well. Honestly, it's something that should have been accounted for in the visual edit; hiding the spots where it's really noticeable with different shots. Obviously that's not always possible though.


2

That's the best I can think of. That, and to charge by the hour. :D


2

B's and P's baby. To a lesser extent F's, M's and V's.


2

Frame by frame, line by line.....You have to accept the tedium of the task. That's the price for an inaccurate performance (if the sync was done after the picture). Elastic Audio as well as some other TCE tools such as VocAlign will work...but I would cut the "lines" into the smallest possible pieces - using TCE as minimally as possible.


2

Maggot's "Assemblerator" or Sounds in Syncs "EdiLoad" both do what you need if you can get an EDL.


2

To extrapolate upon Shaun's solid answer, have you checked for pulldown? A skew of that much within that duration time has me guessing theres either an 0.10$ pullup/pulldown which needs to be corrected for. Hit CRLT+2 in PT and check the bottom section for Pullup/Pulldown and see if any of the NTSC presets (+/- 0.10%) seem to fix the problem, at least ...


2

I agree with rene. This doesn't sound like a complete redo rather than a chunky re conform with additional work to do with the new material. Products like conformalizer and virtual katy exist to help this process but with some thought, and careful editing practice, you should be able to work through the film. Save a new session as the director's cut, make ...


2

sounds like you've got a common mess on your hands. as much of a pain as it is, you'll probably get a better result from going through the reconform steps than from re-doing the entire thing from scratch. There are utilities that can help with this. Maggot Software's conformalizer has tools that can compare edls from the first cut and the second cut - ...


2

I hate idiosyncrasies like this. First things first: How many frames is it off? Have you asked the director how he rendered? Are you working from his rendered files or something like an OMF? I've had similar issues where the audio will be about 1 frame longer than the video (when going from a Pro Tools audio render to a Premiere video render). Sometimes ...


2

Wow.. that sucks ... Where is the assistant editor?! Are they sure they can't go through and matchframe their edit clip by clip to give you the full multitrack audio? Quite standard practice in situations where you havent decided on this audio-conforming workflow. I'm assuming you're having to go through this process because they have cut with the mix ...


2

As long as the time code is reliable and your camera didn't drop frames, it should be as simple as laying them back to back and then syncing the audio. I normally recommend syncing to a point in the beginning and then checking if it still lines up at the end. If not, a couple of factors could be in play. It could be that the timecode is just off from ...


2

Unfortunately, even if you script a trigger for both apps at the same time they will not reliably be synced, so you are better off planning to sync in post production. This can be very easy if you use a clapperboard or similar- this gives a sharp sound which is ready to line up in any editor ( some will do it automatically ) and takes very little time.


2

Ableton Live can output MIDI notes/CCs pretty easily, so if you have visualization software that can use this to trigger visualizations, you should be set - you can just wire them togeter with some virtual-MIDI-port software (Bome's or OSX IAC or something like that). Ableton also has some kind of MIDI Sync feature, although I hear it's fairly buggy. I've ...


2

I don't know of any editor that do this natively, but there are plugins such as the RedGiant's Trapcode Sound-Keys (it has a free trial so you can check it out first) which allow you to this is a fairly easy manner.


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