10

...if most consumer-grade audio playback systems are not designed to be flat or accurate, why is it considered practical to write, mix, or master your music on "flat" monitors? Because most consumer-grade audio playback systems are not flat or accurate... The goal of a "flat" near-field studio monitor is to let you hear what is actually going on, while ...


9

What you have is too much bass bouncing off the walls. You've created what are called standing waves in your room, which is very common. When there is a standing wave for any frequency, some spots in the room will have almost none of that frequency audible and other spots will have almost double. When you move around, you pass through both kinds of places. ...


7

No such thing as flat response There is no such thing as a speaker with a flat response - neither in theory (maths) nor in practice (electronics + mechanics) such a speaker can be built. The term is often used like so: Flat response, 60Hz - 20kHz, ± 5dB @ 100 dBSPL. Which means that within the frequency range given (60Hz - 20kHz), when test signal was ...


6

Several points are to be considered : PC output vs dedicated Audio Interface output A PC will output consumer line level. A dedicated interface will output either consumer line level or professional line level, or both. The quality of a dedicated interface will probably be better than the default sound chipset of a consumer PC. The difference might not be ...


5

The audio interface would be used instead of your sound card. The laptop itself shouldn't play a role in the quality of the sound. (Though it can happen... see @left's comment below) The sound quality will be affected by the signal chain. I.e., the original audio quality, the settings of the software you use to edit the audio, the interface you ...


3

A couple of things to add on; If you are djing, then I assume you won't be sitting by your computer?? The way you describe it, it does sound like standing waves. If you are to produce, then you should get correctly set up. Using headphones with a flat response can help you get an idea of how your monitors should sound. Bear in mind that while producing ...


3

If you're using the set up purely for mixing in the DJ sense, as you've indicated, then it doesn't particularly matter how you position things. I'd suggest you go with your gut preference and what gives you what you feel you need to hear. However, you will find it an advantage to learn to mix in a variety of monitoring situations, the monitoring in DJ booths ...


3

If you take a look at any studio you will most likely see a few sets of monitors in them, someone beat me to the NS-10's but its worth going into a bit more depth on why they are so important historically. First off flat monitors (or close to flat) are useful as they generally have a wide range and you can hear everything you need to though them from bass ...


3

It is worth using an audio interface if you want to maximize sound quality, however you can also get by just fine with your built in sound card for a while if you want to save for a better interface. The #1 difference between a professional audio interface and a built in consumer sound card is the quality of the DAC or Digital to Analog Converter. ...


3

I don't think you'll find any monitors that are truly flat. Each brand and each set of monitors seems to have its own way it colors the sound. Choosing a set of monitors is one of the more personal choices you can make for your studio. Other things to take into account are the slew rate or how fast it reacts to frequency changes, transients etc. Bass ...


2

Just because a monitor is flat at one particular target listening volume does not mean that it is either a) flat at all volumes or b) able to reproduce the same range of frequencies with the same dynamic range. One set of speakers may be able to keep a flat response across a range of volumes and simultaneously produce both clear, quite sounds while still ...


2

Construct a CD with 5-8 songs of different genres. Ones you really like the mix in and that you know well. Listen how each song performs on the monitors. Make sure the monitors are in a room that is also treated when you test them. I see the word studio, so I will assume that there is acoustic wall treatment then.


2

The two options you are suggesting are very different. But there may be a third that you are not thinking of. To understand this, you need to understand that there are three components at play here, but these components may often be combined into a single device. These three components are controller, synthesizer, and monitor. The controller is your ...


2

This might be overkill, but you can use the same security cables you'd use with a laptop or anything with the Kensington security slots, but instead of relying on the slots, you'd install the same fastener points on the speakers as you will to the desk. Targus Security Plates I'm sure there are other options, and ones that may involve either stronger ...


2

The mini-jack will be a stereo jack socket, which requires a TIP/RING/SLEEVE plug to interface correctly. The two signals you will need are TIP/SLEEVE and RING/SLEEVE - with SLEEVE being the signal ground. You should be able to obtain a stereo minijack to RCA converter cable or plug adapter that will do this for you. The signal loss across this connection ...


1

One thing that I found out btw is that when I plug Behringer directly with its USB to pc there is no more noise. It seems the problem is my MAudio Interface. But what will I do with that? Should I change my usb cable? The USB cable is unlikely to be the culprit though it's the cheapest solution so maybe worth a try. If the MAudio device supports an external ...


1

You should consider a "Studio Monitor Controller" with the appropriate number of input (stereo-)channels, and appropriate amount of output (stereo-)channels for your specific requirements. Connecting both my mixers and my audio interface to my studio monitors This title of your question indicates 3 input (stereo-)channel/sources two sources connected ...


1

Technically, you don't need studio monitors. If you know what a great mix sounds like on your headphones, and you understand what mixing decisions are necessary to create a similarly great mix, then do you really need anything more? This is the underlying concept behind A/B'ing and why it's so important. Studio monitors are a fantastic tool for creating ...


1

The term "2-way" has nothing to do with mono or stereo. 2-way means that the monitor speaker reproduces the audio signal with two speaker cones, each responsible for a certain frequency range that are finely tuned to work together. The same is true for 3-way monitor speakers, or any monitor speaker with more than one cone for that matter. A single monitor ...


1

That horrible hiss sound is system noise. Realtek audio inputs on PC's and laptops are cheap and the circuits are not well shielded. So noise from the electronic components finds its way in to the audio path. Either buy an interface or a better soundcard like a soundblaster if it's playback.


1

Studio monitors are very practical, not to mention an all-around wise choice. The two foremost reasons in my mind are: 1) As an engineer, you NEED to be able to hear exactly what's going on in your audio... no more, no less. Studio monitors gives you this ability - depending on what grade of monitor you purchase. Consumer payback systems cannot give the ...


1

One thing that I don't see mentioned in the other answers but which some industry pros claim (or at least those at Polk do) is that having a very wobbly frequency response graph sounds (subjectively) worse than one that has smoother slopes... even if both fall within the same absolute bands (e.g. plus or minus 3dB). It doesn't sound hard to believe in ...


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