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I strongly recommend you to get a copy of Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema by David Sonnenschein. It will give you a good idea of all the elements to look out for in sound design for film.


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All Ingmar Bergman movies if u wanna see the best use of silence. The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries etc etc.


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+1 for District 9 I was also fascinated by sound and music texture of Once Upon a Time in the West Percussive textures without music and excellent sound from my point of hear is in The Hurt Locker


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Wild Strawberries The Seventh Seal Cries and Whispers by Ingmar Bergman are the best ones to study the excellent use of silence in a film. Besides these a few of my personal favourites include Peeping Tom, The Conversation, Once Upon A Time In The West and OFCOURSE Apocalypse Now! A lotta films are going through my head right now, these are a few.


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+1 for Andrew's suggestion. My suggestion for you would be to break down film sound into components and approach the film for each one. Please feel free to look at my old dissertation if it helps you in that regard. http://ianpalmersound.com/2010/08/26/64/


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It sounds like you're still working your way into this process, and I think you're going to have a hard time getting much that is substantive from such a broad approach. You'll probably find it much more beneficial to focus on smaller bytes of information first. Select a scene only, and watch it over...and over...and over............and over. Get to the ...


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I agree with Andy Lewis on this one and feel that all of the elements are in the soundtrack are there to serve the story. With the elements in the soundtrack being dialog, sound effects, ambiance and score, one has to look at all of these things and how they tell the story, as well as how they work together to make everything complete i.e. the mix. Is the ...


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All the things you mention are usually there to try and give an emotive response for the audience when viewing. Try to think why the sounds are being used instead of just how they are used too. Think of what the characters might be thinking/feeling at any given point any how the sound is reflecting this. This might make it easier to piece together the ...


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In the UK, Masters level courses in arts subjects -tend- to focus more on theory/concept than the technical aspects; its generally expected that you know those already, and that what you're doing is of a personal research nature. I know that Edinburgh's course is fairly 'conceptually' focussed, for example. The balance of that may vary among these courses, ...


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Interesting question. I can understand your difficulty in making a decision. However I feel that you are overlooking the fact that you probably won't learn a whole lot, simply because you already have learned in practice. Most University courses I know focus a lot on technical aspects, that's not exactly what you need. (That is an impressive list of skills, ...


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Columbia College Chicago


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Two things I regularly study nowadays are: How are sounds choices playing contextually to the story/moment? (big, small, brash, subtle, etc) How are "real" sounds cinematicaly cheated effectively? (Example: hot cars always sound like a slip-n-slide and it feels "right" on screen, but hardly ever do we hear a car in real life creating those kinds of skids ...


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Stoker by Chan-wook Park it's sublime I must say!!! http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1682180/


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I'd have to second the vote on 'Playtime' (Jacques Tati) this is totally awesome use of Foley which brings together the whole absurdity of the film perfectly. The opening airport scene is brilliant! Without repeating anything suggested by anyone else, 'The Tree of Life' (Terrence Malick) and in particular the 30 minute evolution sequence. Demonstrates how ...


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Check out Robert Altman's large ensemble films like Nashville (1976) and A Wedding (1978). In Nashville, at least, he had 24 tracks going – one for each character.


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I love films of Turkish director Nuri Bilge Ceylan :koza, Iklimler, Uzak, Three monkeys.I also love the way Hou Hsiao Hsien minimally uses sound in his films like : A time to live time to die, Flight of the red balloons, Summer at Grand pa's and films by Terennce malick, The thin red line


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"Barton Fink" is a better sound-film made by the Coens than "No Country for Old man" if you ask me. The work is much more subtle but has a huge impact on the way we look at the characters' environment. Then there's this small new wave of documentary-makers in the Netherlands who all do some really interesting stuff with sound for example the film: "4 ...


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