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If you're on a Mac or UNIX box, you might be able to do something useful with a UNIX-domain socket and dtach - basically you'd have your recording "server" save to the socket in .wav format, and then have dtach connect to the socket and multiplex the output into multiple encoders (cat, lame, flac, etc.). It would look something like this: dtach -A fifo-...


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A tiny mixer is probably the easiest and most straightforward way to go. Although product recommendations are generally off-topic, it's difficult to illustrate a solution without showing actual hardware. A quick search turns up the Behringer Xenyx 502 which should do what you're looking for. Your two inputs would go into LINE IN 2/3 and 4/5 (they are stereo ...


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In my experience this is a hardware issue. The sound is when the input hardware of the PC getting too hot signal and clipping. The first step to try then is to decrease the "gain" of the signal going into the PC. There migth be a volume control on the line out or something similar. A probable better solution is to purchase a simple external sound ...


2

First, I highly recommend Reaper http://www.reaper.fm/ and the Sweetwater Studio Extensions. You can use Reaper 100% free for a really long time and then decide if you want to drop the $60 on a personal/non-profit license. I'm not sure about realtime, but check out this tutorial Beat detective


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Hey one thing that I use for such tasks are automator patches! In apples Automator you can Programm (dont worry its simple) simple movements and tasks like pick a file and move it to this place ... Then you can use the compressor (software You find in the Apple store, best Software to encode) to create a droplett (Icon on the desktop, when you put a file on ...


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@ OP Isn't this what you need? vban receptor app


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You need to use Dante Via by Audinate.


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You can use something like Sonos. This is a simple way of creating a multiroom streaming service. If you're a bit technical and think the Sonos is to expensive you can look into something like the HiFi Berry. This is much cheaper but requires a bit of work.


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When you plug a mic into your soundcard, it's typically plugged into a dedicated microphone input. If you're going to connect the stereo output of your mixing desk to your computer, you'll most likely be using a different input, typically called the line-in (most soundcards have one). The best way to be sure is to test it out before hand, would be asking ...


1

Shotgun microphones, by definition, are very narrow directional microphones. Placing them on the side will give you a hard time because of that. Microphones should be placed in front of you, since I assume you are talking toward the TV, and aimed at your heads. Panning each microphone hard left and right should give you a good separation from each other. ...


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Snag an sm58 or anything of similar type. I've seen a bunch of tutorials where the instructor has one hooked up to a mic stand and right near their mouth. Works great. Obviously the easier thing would be to get one with a usb out. Something like this http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=751977&gclid=CjwKEAjw6_q5BRCOp-Hj-...


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I'd look for any encoder that can support MPEG-TS encoding for 30 channels. The problem you will run in to with doing 30 independent ffmpeg streams is that they will not properly interleave and you will likely get jumps when switching channels. You need an encoder that can take in to mind all 30 streams and use a fixed clock to sync the packets of audio ...


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As Todd Wilcox pointed out, one would normally record directly into the DAW. Reaper is a great choice for that, cost-wise. However, if you're interested in finding out where a beat is lagging or pushing against a set tempo, simply record into any software that can provide a click for you to play to, then listen back (with the click enabled and playing) and ...


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