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10

The best course I can recommend is to use the best tools and resources you have available. Headphones are not ideal, but they're better than bad speakers, and probably better than even good speakers in a bad listening environment. A lot depends on what you're mixing and what the target environment will be. Mixing music or voice that will mainly be consumed ...


8

When you have a measurement of inches referring to a speaker it is the diameter of that speaker, so a 12" 400W speaker is physically 12" wide and is rated at a maximum of 400 Watts. The wattage is so you know how much power you can push through the speaker without damaging it. More Watts = more volume The physical size is very closely related to the ...


8

Suggestive Specifications Both the inches and the Watts are suggestive specifications of the following: Inches - The approximate diameter of the bass driver cone (if there is more than one driver, like in multi-way design). It is an approximation since some designs spell 8'' for what is really 7.8''. This spec vaguely correlates to the lowest frequency the ...


7

As you still seem to wonder about differences in sound between different speaker sizes: The speaker diameter is not directly related to how much bass you can get. Most important for that is the cabinet size: without a cabinet, for any speaker most of the air will just "flow around" from front to back vice versa, if given enough time; so some distance away ...


6

The connectors are simply there to allow you to daisy chain speakers. You can go in one and out the other. The order does not matter at all as it is just a basic parallel circuit with the drivers in the middle.


5

The audio interface would be used instead of your sound card. The laptop itself shouldn't play a role in the quality of the sound. (Though it can happen... see @left's comment below) The sound quality will be affected by the signal chain. I.e., the original audio quality, the settings of the software you use to edit the audio, the interface you ...


5

At first I was reluctant to answer this question, as I believe in order to do this properly, will cost more than the value of said sub-woofer. However as nobody else has commented, I will give you an answer on how you can do this. There are two problems we need to overcome: The mixer has no further outputs to connect the subwoofer. The subwoofer has ...


4

It is a good idea to avail yourself to as many different listening environments as possible. As others have mentioned, higher quality monitors and higher quality listening environments will allow for more precise control. However, unless your end user will be listening in that same high quality environment, some of that precision will be lost to the ...


4

The way I look at it is that the speaker is an air pump. The larger the diaphragm, the more air that can potentially be pumped. However, the larger the pump, the more resistant to moving the air it will be. Like trying to waft a big sheet of cardboard around, you need strong arms to waft it faster, and if someone asked you to waft the card 2x per second, ...


4

Watts per pound. That is to say you want to evaluate on the following criteria: How portable is it? (Can you fit it in your car with all the other gear? Will these be light enough for you to pick up and move?) How powerful is it? (Can you fill your average venue with enough clean as in non-clipping volume with some head room to spare?) To simplify, the ...


4

An electronic circuit is what the name implies - a circuit. For it to work there has to be a continuous unbroken loop from the power source (in this case the amplifier) through the load (the coils in the speaker) and back to the amplifier. Hence the two wires. Without an unbroken loop no current can flow, and nothing can happen. Another way to look at it ...


4

First, you will need to provide a power amplifier for each different speaker cabinet. You did not mention what model you have so we don't know what power, what kind of processing, etc. you would need. Then you will need to divide your signal (source not disclosed) into the channels appropriate for each speaker cabinet and come up with five wireless links ...


4

MDF has very good acoustic properties at a low price. But it is heavy and does not hold up well to being bumped around. Also doesn't do well in moist environments. It is not used for pro portable speakers for those reasons. It's a good choice for speakers that won't be moved very much. Almost all professional speakers use void free Baltic Birch plywood. ...


4

Electrically, yes. Acoustically no. You also have to take into consideration the physical effects of having multiple point-sources of audio, specifically the way that each point-source interacts with the other. IF you are placing these four speakers inside a single cabinet, then there are other acoustic effects relating to bass porting and cabinet volume to ...


4

There's quite a few ways this question can be answered, but perhaps the most concise way to do it is to ask you to consider the properties of waves in general. You understand that in order to produce sound, the membrane has to vibrate. In order to vibrate, a force must act upon it and that force is provided by the coil and the magnet that sit at the apex of ...


3

While I agree with Jim, to use the best tools you can, I always recommend headphones, if for no other reason to isolate what you're recording from the background noise. You have no idea how many times I've not heard the applicance running in the background until I had my headphones on. Alternately, you may hear a lawnmower outside, but only upon wearing ...


3

Josh said most there is to say already. If you like the sound you have now over studio monitors (something NS-10 like, without subwoofers) then you shouldn't worry about it sounding horrible over laptop speakers – all music does. If it already sounds bad over such monitors or smaller hifi speakers, you probably should do something about it. Again, EQing ...


3

A couple things come to mind... Unless you're mixing for internet streaming, don't base your mix on how it sounds through laptop speakers. Those little 1" drivers are just plain incapable of producing anything down in the bass fundamentals range. You say you've tried EQing in some higher frequencies. You can only "EQ in" what's already there of course, ...


3

Your question contains part of the answer: eliminate the speakers as a factor by trying headphones, or by connecting the current right speaker to the left channel and so on to see if the imbalance follows the speakers. If they're not the problem, do all inputs to the amp show the same effect? If so, it's very likely the amp. If there's only one input and ...


3

There is a logic to your argument, but the problem arises from the fact that there are thousands of models of consumer speaker, all with their own way of 'flattering' the sound. If you mix on one pair, it may become bass heavy on another. The idea behind studio monitors is that the sound is as neutral as possible, so that the mix will more or less be ...


3

I can't tell the exact speaker model, but they are studio monitors from KRK Systems. The devices on the bottom of that photo are production switchers, which are designed for doing live video production. The screens appear to be the monitors for the switchers themselves, so it isn't software, it is hardware. You are also probably looking at atleast 25 ...


3

I agree with @leftaroundabout, this sounds just like a problem I saw at my old middle school many years ago. Almost certainly there is a noise gate somewhere in the signal chain that is cutting out when the input signal is too low, or not responding fast enough when the signal is present. Look for something with a "threshold" parameter. If the system is ...


3

Whether it its a sine wave or not is almost irrelevant. I say almost, as if you do hit a resonant frequency you could destroy something else in the room - theoretically... you would need power to do this though. You did not destroy your laptop speakers because you played a sine wave. You may have destroyed them because the volume was too high or there was ...


3

It is impossible to tell without the input impedance of the speakers, but generally speaking the answer to your question is yes - you can damage either the speakers or the amp. Say your speakers are each 8 ohms. If you connect 3 in series, you'll be presenting 24 ohms to the amp (8 + 8 + 8). This means the speakers will easily 'suck' the power off the amp, ...


3

If you are referring to the hardware that retains the jack, in the US it is a 3/8-32 jam nut. Most likely.


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