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Interesting topic! If you first imagine that sound waves emanating from a point source (which you are going to have to approximate as a speaker) will emit spherically. Where the sphere intersects first with the paper, you will notice a dot on the paper appearing in your image. That is the point at which the wavefront hits the paper and is the earliest ...


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In the three clips you call out, the only effect I hear is a slight reverse reverb or pre-echo. In your audio editor, select the audio you want to process and reverse it so it plays backwards. Then apply a short reverb effect. Don’t go crazy here; a little goes a long way. Then re-reverse the audio so the reverb tails fade in before each word. It’ll ...


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Effects You can apply a reverse-compression (a quick Google search will give you many results). This will make the sound more plucky and it will feel like a palm muted sound because the release length (ADSR) of the sample will have a lower volume compared to the other parts of the sample. Now you can apply a low-pass EQ and a little bit of distortion. Now ...


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There are no standards as such for Sound Effects libraries. There are related standards around file data formats maintained by the AES but generally there is nothing required that is related to Sound Effects libraries specifically. There are industry conventions that you might consider, such as: Recording at a minimum of 48kHz sampling rate (preferably ...


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It has noise. A square wave. (B Note) A click in the low mids. two click in the low The person who recorded this video, added extra machine sound which is not necessary to add. Or you can just add another layer of noise and keep you EQ band at low mids.


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