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If you're 'just' editing, at a push you can use pretty much anything. If you're mixing, or any situation where you need to be aware of true EQ, levels or placement within a stereo field, then headphones can often be misleading. With speakers, your brain can figure out not just what, but where each sound is & the relative levels between them. On ...


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In general, to lift consonants, you have to push back the vowels, otherwise things can just get 'fizzy'. You could try this with EQ - lifting somewhere between 1 - 4kHz, but I think that's more likely to over-emphasise T's & S's than R's, resulting in 'fizzy'. I'd go for a compressor - particularly a multiband compressor. This will allow you to ...


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Unless you have specific measuring tools for headphones, you'd have to do it by ear - see this for a quick rundown of how you can do it on Mac - How to do speaker correction on a MacBook Pro Retina Windows might be a tougher proposition, unless you can leverage something like Equalizer APO into your workflow. I have no real experience with audio routing on ...


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Like Mark said, you can't. Mixing audio is literally adding the samples together at each moment in time to produce a single result. That works whether it's digital numbers, analog voltage, or acoustic air pressure. So "unmixing" a track is like taking the number 273 and figuring out what two numbers were originally added to get it. You can't do that. ...


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One thing that might be helpful is to use what I believe is called "strip silence", where logic will analyze the audio file and break it into chunks by removing any portions that don't have any audio above the threshold you set (I haven't used this in a long time, so that may not be the name of the function but it's something like that). From there, you'd ...


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