6

To quote Thomas Edison "I have not failed. I've just found 10000 ways that won't work." It's always a horrible feeling when you look back at something at realize it wasn't as good as you'd hoped. Look at this as an opportunity to discover some things about yourself. Maybe you don't want to work under those sort of conditions in future projects, so that will ...


5

Most film is art, not life/reality. Sound designers have to match the visual art on screen with the sonic art of their mix, and that usually includes a certain amount of "realer than real", suspending some of what we "know" about physics in order to tell the story in a way that translates to this 2-dimensional, 2-sense media. Case in point, when we see some ...


3

A show usually has a leader reference tone and also has pops, known as sync pops or head pops (versus tail pops) or casually just called "2 pop". The reference tone is in regard to calibration level, the 2 pop is (secondarily for calibration) but primarily for ensuring sync - especially when we';re talking about ProTools sessions containing the ...


3

Izotope RX is probably what you'd want. You can start with basic if your on a budget and then upgrade to advanced later. It has plugin components as well as a standalone version. It and Cedar are pretty much the standards at this point. Multiband compression/expansion or something like the Waves WNS or W43 can help for a constant noise.


3

NOTE: this response was to the original iteration of the question. To be perfectly honest, this question rubs me the wrong way - a first actually. What rubs me the wrong way, and this is merely an observation of principal and NOT a judgement of personality/character... is that I sense a lack of gratitude, a lack of appreciation for what has been had and ...


3

I'm afraid what you are asking for could be the equivalent of taking a Victoria sponge cake & asking for the flour, sugar, butter & eggs back in separate bowls. If there are clear spaces between each person speaking, you have a chance; any audio editor such as Audacity [freeware] can be used to [manually] split the audio at each gap, then move each ...


3

If you're 'just' editing, at a push you can use pretty much anything. If you're mixing, or any situation where you need to be aware of true EQ, levels or placement within a stereo field, then headphones can often be misleading. With speakers, your brain can figure out not just what, but where each sound is & the relative levels between them. On ...


2

Well as far as I know, Gary Rydstrom is the one who has won the most number of Oscars for achievement in Sound. But still if you wan to know more about others too, you can look up here. Hope that helps!


2

This is a screenshot I just made from iZotope RX. Note the irregular selection in the frequency domain, and the photoshop-like tool buttons in the bottom right. iZotope has many frequency domain editing possibilities, as does Adobe Audition since the days of Cool Edit Pro, more than 10 years ago. With an old tool called Coagula, you can convert image ...


2

Well amplitude is a pretty important thing to know about. As is waveform shape and DC offset. Adobe audition has allowed spectral editing for many years now, as does Izotpe RX and Iris. 3d spectrograms for audio currently look like this: (From Izotope Ozone) I'm not sure editing in 3d would provide any more functionality than 2d which we already have. ...


2

My advice would be to always import everything into PT, make your choice which 'blend' of mics suit each other over the edits. Then audiosuite/RX anything needed, but keep the original in place, muted, or on an inactive track. My personal experience is to go as easy on the denoiser as possible, and use volume and eq to fix up things. Happy mixing :-) ...


2

I'll bring them all in and sync them first, then do a broad chop of all of the unusable stuff. This is so that I can cover those tracks with crossfades, which I can't do in RX. Once I have my basic edits completed I'll do an RX pass, then reimport to protools for mixdowns.


2

This is an ordinary function of any audio editor -- it's what editing is. I don't know of a specific tool within your program to do this, or what specific challenges you see. But unless there are odd or unusual circumstances, it's a simple matter for an experienced operator to join two segments. In a program like Audacity (free), you might place the two ...


2

Hard work, talent and a good attitude ... Your reputation well precede you. If you are good people will find out.


2

1st of all, if the voice coming from the speaker has some characteristics picked up by the fact that's miced and going through amps & speaker, maybe you could EQ those so they can pop a bit and create a contrast between the other sounds/people talking w/e.. If the "right next to the camera" talkings obscure the speech, sadly there's little you can do. ...


2

No "standards" that I'm aware of, but what I've seen most often in film post-production is: Production Dialog ADR Group FX Design BG Foley Music


1

I would use Audacity. It is a free sound editing app, relatively straightforward and easy to use, and has the capability of opening and saving as mp3. Two recommendations: Save as ogg/vorbis, not mp3. The quality will be just as good, if not slightly better, and using the format does not require any licensing. MP3 is a proprietary format and if you make any ...


1

Nowadays it can be edited with programs like Tascam Hi-Res Editor: http://tascam.com/product/hi-res_editor/ From their site: TASCAM Hi-Res Editor is a new, free application that plays and edits up to 11MHz DSD or 384kHz WAV files. The software allows playback and export of DSD files without converting to PCM audio. This app is available now as a free ...


1

This is a complex question =-) there's only one software that allows for true DSD editing, Sonoma Systems. This software however relies on sound card dependencies. DSD cannot be edited because there's only one bit, therefore it cannot be manipulated. At the point of edit Sonoma converts the audio to multi-bit DSD, and then goes back to 1bit after the edit. ...


1

You could theoretically take the wet and dry tracks and drop them into a new session, invert the phase on the dry track, and then adjust the level on the dry track until it cancels out the dry component of the wet track, then bounce the result as your new wet track. The easier way to go about it is to simply produce a wet track that is 100% wet, rather than ...


1

That's due to something called aliasing. You see you can hear from 20Hz-20kHz so you need to sample sound at twice that frequency. This is why CDs use 44.1kHz. Now I know what you're thinking. Your sound is sampled at 44.1kHz or 48kHz, and you're right but hang on. Whenever you display your audio on your screen you're effectively resampling a sampled ...


1

Most DAWs should be able to accomplish this. That said I think you should check out Reaper. You can keyframe, as well as draw envelopes/curves. It also has ripple delete which is nice, and some video editing features as well. Premiere is clunky when working with audio, I think you'll find Reaper much more fluid. The only thing I'm not sure about is saving ...


1

Well I listened to "I say a little prayer" and your singing could improve somewhat - a bit pitchy some people would say. But this can be worked on. I was the same and I improved some folk will say LOL. Now what I hear as the main problem is that the backing track is probably fairly compressed so the dynamics are constrained so, when you place an ...


1

I bring everything into Pro Tools and clean with RX or EQ/Compression inside of ProTools. It's makes it easier to keep a copy to go back to the original if needed as well as keep everything in sync and process your files more "in the mix" of how your finished tracks will sound.


1

Normally you cut on a break in the sound. If not, as long as the sound on the other end of both is roughly the same, you could try a cross fade. Otherwise, you are pretty much out of luck. Sounds are very complex things for the most part and if we're very good at picking out if they don't line up right. Almost any sudden change is going to be ...


1

DISCLAIMER: I am veeeerry tired and maybe the following text is just plain stupid. In that case: Excuse me and ignore the following :) I think thunderclaps can be used in different ways. If thunder is used only as a dramatic effect, there is no reason to be realistic when it comes to time delay. In those cases the thunder could be understood as something ...


1

I think its because as you say; the time offset would be odd in a narrative. In films the point of the thunder/lightning is to possibly give information about the environment for plot reasons or to enhance the mood of a scene. In mot cases there is no story reason to have "accurate" time offset of the thunder.


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