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9

The industry standard right now is 24bit, 48kHz. The frame rate doesn't influence those settings. Depending on the type of work you are doing (dialog editing, foley editing, sound effects editing or design), your sample rate may vary anywhere from 48k all the way up to 192k. But 99% of the sessions that are ultimately destined for a professional dub stage ...


6

To quote Thomas Edison "I have not failed. I've just found 10000 ways that won't work." It's always a horrible feeling when you look back at something at realize it wasn't as good as you'd hoped. Look at this as an opportunity to discover some things about yourself. Maybe you don't want to work under those sort of conditions in future projects, so that will ...


6

Use dynamic range compression. Set the threshold to kick in only on the louder voice, and adjust the ratio until the levels between the two voices match. Attack and release times of about 100ms should work.


5

Ah, the dreaded re-conform. There'a a variety ways to do this, on a variety of budget levels and time turn around situations. Software packages out there like Virtual Katy and Conformalizer work by comparing EDLs or working with Change Notes. While they can work very well as I've heard, I wouldn't be too surprised if you still have to massage all the ...


5

First off, the director doesn't know what he/she is doing if they're providing you 4 "final" edits. The most any director should provide is 2 (i.e. festival/feature cut and television/broadcast cut), and those are never simultaneous. In my experience, one is always completed and output before the other. You've also been exposed to the oxymoronic term "final"...


5

Most film is art, not life/reality. Sound designers have to match the visual art on screen with the sonic art of their mix, and that usually includes a certain amount of "realer than real", suspending some of what we "know" about physics in order to tell the story in a way that translates to this 2-dimensional, 2-sense media. Case in point, when we see some ...


4

Hi audiLE, I have had the same problems in the past where I have been sound editor/designer and not the on set recorder. What I suggest is you first ask for any room tones they may have recorded. If they are clean and well recorded then you may be able to mask some of the background noise. If they are not usable then its going to be even more difficult ...


4

My forté is not in dialog editing but I can shed some light based on working with and learning from some really talented people: Do you like 4 frames or 2 frames fade outs and ins on scenes? How long do you like your fades from character to character in a scene? Depends on the scene but I'd use 2 frames as the standard. That's how I prepare FX, BG and ...


3

Doing a series of commercial ads for survivor , they by this im referring to the agency ( agency team of blue haired , bad dressed , cell phone glued freaks ) wanted the following within their ads Ad 1 : Sound of piranhas eating meat of a man's left leg. Ad 2 : Sounds of a a python slowly crushing a human arm Ad 3 : A squawk of a parrot that has just been ...


3

Hey! I'm just going through exactly the same problem! I came up with some simple things who had reduced like 70% of the noise 40-50% of reverb. The scenario was just the same: 3 people having dialogue, one shotgun terribly placed, an empty bar with no furniture and large windows. Most of the noise came from refrigereting machines. My advice is as if don't ...


3

Since I started out as an ADR mixer and dialogue editor and did this for quite a while, I have a few guidelines I make sure are known if I have someone cutting for me, and these are: Never consolidate an edit. I like all edits to be on the track and easily fixable if there is something I hear that is not quite right (I have an ear for the slightest over-...


3

Exactly what Gary said - you don't need to ADR, what international M&Es are looking for are the effects and music, which includes foley. They do not need or use the dialogue track (someone please correct me if I'm mistaken). So yes, you will have to record fand/orcut in foley effects for PFX that are embedded into the dialogue tracks. The international ...


3

NOTE: this response was to the original iteration of the question. To be perfectly honest, this question rubs me the wrong way - a first actually. What rubs me the wrong way, and this is merely an observation of principal and NOT a judgement of personality/character... is that I sense a lack of gratitude, a lack of appreciation for what has been had and ...


3

Izotope RX is probably what you'd want. You can start with basic if your on a budget and then upgrade to advanced later. It has plugin components as well as a standalone version. It and Cedar are pretty much the standards at this point. Multiband compression/expansion or something like the Waves WNS or W43 can help for a constant noise.


3

A show usually has a leader reference tone and also has pops, known as sync pops or head pops (versus tail pops) or casually just called "2 pop". The reference tone is in regard to calibration level, the 2 pop is (secondarily for calibration) but primarily for ensuring sync - especially when we';re talking about ProTools sessions containing the ...


3

I'm afraid what you are asking for could be the equivalent of taking a Victoria sponge cake & asking for the flour, sugar, butter & eggs back in separate bowls. If there are clear spaces between each person speaking, you have a chance; any audio editor such as Audacity [freeware] can be used to [manually] split the audio at each gap, then move each ...


2

On a side-note to Shaun's post, if you're using Nuendo and cannot go the EDL route, there is a very useful alignment tool which will align any region to another. If you get the omf for the new cut, manually re-syncing becomes much, much easier. As Shaun said, you can load the new omf into your existing session and re-align the regions. To re-align, ...


2

Definitely don't grin and bear it. I think this is where managing clients' expectations comes in. The client needs to understand that reconforming takes up your time, especially when they don't even want to provide an edit change list! If it's an unpaid gig, it might be an idea to tell them that they can only submit one cut to you for work, and can't change ...


2

you're going the right away about it already it seems, if it's any help this is what I've done in this situation. 1) ask for alt. takes, you can replace some dialogue and cut it up to match lipsync. Stretching the vowels in words can help you fit them. 20 ask for room tones and ambiences, draw out bumps etc and cover using tone. 3) explain to the director ...


2

This is going to be an issue of managing your client's expectations. Make sure the director is aware of the difficult nature of the work, and WHY it is difficult. Obviously, you have to be careful doing this. Pointing out problems has to be presented in a constructive way. Talk about the possible solutions available and what effect they will have on the ...


2

Well as far as I know, Gary Rydstrom is the one who has won the most number of Oscars for achievement in Sound. But still if you wan to know more about others too, you can look up here. Hope that helps!


2

I haven't used it yet, but I've been dieing to try DUY's Magic Spectrum. I've heard great things about it. Might be worth a look. If you can't do that, I've found that EQ'ing in individual bands of frequencies at a time can make the job of matching dialog MUCH easier. Use high and low pass filters to make a band pass on the original and the re-record, then ...


2

I've done a lot of work in animation. As a rough guide I would say that a 12 minute episode (assuming a common delivery of 52x12 min episodes) that you would need 3 days tracklay and 1/2 day to mix. That's also presuming a fairly involved tracklay with little foley and most sounds from libraries. Make sure that you budget time to create all the delivery ...


2

I've recently had to do the very same thing for a kids show I work on. The most time efficient way to do this is load the laughs into a sampler, and 'play' them to picture. My sampler of choice for this is Structure. I map out my laughs in intensity from small to large across the keys leaving the black keys for any special laughs or reactions. I've been ...


2

I would also highly recommend checking out the new extended interview with Mike Wabro on the Pro Tools Expert blog. Download the podcast. Some great insight into conforming and re-conforming in it. Speaks highly of new Ediload software too. Definitely worth taking the time out to listen!


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