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Only a non-answer for now: I searched on this issue for weeks, and found no research or publication that investigate what Ayasugi or other sound box patterning actually do (in English at least). In some translations from Japanese or Chinese, it is simply stated that this feature improves the sound. I searched mostly for the instruments Koto and Gu-Qin. An ...


2

I'd suggest 5 ways, 1. Find a Piece old enoguh that it has become Creative Commons and Take a recording of it. 2. Google the CC audio up 3. FM Synthesize it Convert this Youtube video into an Audio file (You can't use this Audio file in you track if you are planning to release your track since the video is not creative common, But if you are not planning ...


1

Effects You can apply a reverse-compression (a quick Google search will give you many results). This will make the sound more plucky and it will feel like a palm muted sound because the release length (ADSR) of the sample will have a lower volume compared to the other parts of the sample. Now you can apply a low-pass EQ and a little bit of distortion. Now ...


1

It's DC offset. Apply a DC filter or a high-pass filter to remove.


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Like Mark said, you can't. Mixing audio is literally adding the samples together at each moment in time to produce a single result. That works whether it's digital numbers, analog voltage, or acoustic air pressure. So "unmixing" a track is like taking the number 273 and figuring out what two numbers were originally added to get it. You can't do that. ...


1

As @hobbes mentioned, what you are proposing is not possible. It is, however, possible to render a 5.1 signal to ambisonic B-Format and thence to Binaural which can be experienced only with headphones, but it is not possible in the context of a pair of speakers. In any rate the binaural experience is not as immersive as true 5.1 and this will not be possible ...


1

What you want is to create an audio file that, when played through a speaker that distorts, somehow compensates for that distortion. That's generally impossible, because the distortion is an unpredictable, chaotic 'signal' that's added to your audio. It depends on the exact volume of the audio, the loudspeaker, other sounds in the room, and (because you're ...


1

That’s not a snare, it’s a rimshot and/or a woodblock hit.


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