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5

Sometimes you just need to put a bang on it! It may feel like it's not a weapon because we're so used to threatening weapons having a sharp initial sound. I'd add something like that, doesn't even need to be as distinct as a gunshot. Then back it up straight away (literally from when the trigger is pulled) with a friction type sound such as the one which ...


4

Shotguns help, but they do not 100% isolate anything. The main way to "isolate" a sound in the field is with distance. You want to get as far away from undesired noises and as close to desired noises as possible. The difference with a shotgun is that when you aim it correctly, it gives you more flexibility on the distance, but it doesn't completely isolate ...


4

With complex sounds like that I think the best thing to do is break it into its component parts. What is the sound when it's still (if any). Trigger sound, firing preload, firing impact, texture or unique sound of firing, net leaving the gun, net through air, net landing. For me if I breaking it down into smaller sounds is what can it a uniqueness that ...


4

I don't know specifically how the sound was made, but you can get something very similar using just software. When trying to recreate a sound, it helps to break it down in to layers. This sound for example has an initial transient, a quick sub-drop and an oscillating trill. Start with the trill, for this you can use a sampler that has LFO's and a LP filter....


3

Makes no difference...at least not one that I've ever noticed.


3

If it's for dialogue I'd try and buy a secondhand MKH416. If you had to buy new right away then a K6/ME66. I honestly don't think anything below these is worth owning as they all lack sensitivity and are too noisy. If this wasn't an option I'd hire instead.


2

Mortars tubes firing can work well as it is something big and heavy moving down a barrel at relatively high speed, very similar to what a net launcher would have to do. You probably then want to add a sound of the net flying through the air, but I'm not sure how I'd go about trying to get that component of the sound. You'd finally want it hitting the ...


1

here is a short side-note before I answer your questions: the NTG4+ is a shotgun mic, it might not be the best choice for indoor use (it has an interference tube: it works great outdoor for making the mic more directional, but not so much indoor because the sound bounces off the wall). But if you were to get only one mic for your use-cases for budget reason, ...


1

Actually, there is already a preamp stage of sorts in your signal chain in your PC's in-built MIC IN (I assume you're using mic in, and not line in, right?). In-built sound inputs, however, are usually pretty poor in quality - noisy, not much gain, etc. Another potential problem in your signal chain could be the XLR-3.5mm cable connection. The output of ...


1

The whole idea of the shotgun is that it mainly picks up ambient noise that is in the direction it's pointed. Have the speaker stand with their backs to the quietest area around. If there are trees, walls, hedges, etc., that's where you want the speaker. A truck rolling by or a jet flying over is going to get all over your audio no matter what, so you have ...


1

There are a few ways to do this. For one you can pull it out in post production with some mixing tricks. EQ and noise gates can be your friend here. Keep in mind that you wont want to go too crazy since some background noise is nice. You can try tucking the lav behind a collar or in the neck of the shirt. this may help to block some of the wind. You can ...


1

I would also go for something used with that budget, like a MKH416 or possibly NTG-3.


1

There aren't a ton of options out there. The few that come to mind are the Audio-Technica AT835ST (right around $1k), Sanken CSS-5 ($2300), and the Sennheiser MKH418S ($1700). The Audio-Technica can be used in either M/S or XY mode (it's outputting a decoded M/S signal, not true XY) and the Sanken has multiple modes as well. The Sennheiser is M/S only. I ...


1

If I could only have one mic for FX, I don't think I'd want it to be a shotgun. Shotguns are great, but not for an all-purpose mic. I'd much rather go with an MK4 or MK41. The humidity issues on Schoeps mics are way over-hyped. I doubt you'd have any problems except in the most extreme of conditions, at least based on reports I've heard from Schoeps ...


1

An advantage of the MK41 is the ability to upgrade to an MS stereo setup by adding the MK8 to your rig. You can definitely do that with the CMIT5 as well, but its pickup pattern is narrower, so it may not work as well for an MS rig. If unwanted background noise is an issue with your FX recording, the the CMIT5 may be your best choice because of its increased ...


1

Great idea! I actually did something similar in excel when I was choosing gear. Why don't we start something similar in google docs open to everyone? If more people get involved and can edit, we can have a more exhaustive table even with personal experiences about different gear. In a few hours I'm going to open some excels to start with. I will post them ...


1

Hi, are you sure you don't mean the NTG-3 (may look like an 8, i guess). If so, I use this mic often and it sounds fantastic for outdoor booming. It was a toss up between this mic and the Sennheiser MKH416 and I found that the MKH416 sounded a bit thinner and not as warm as the NTG-3. A little side note, they used the NTG-3 on "Lost", so booyah to that.


1

Never noticed they had something like that. While off-topic, I really wish Rode made a M-S shotgun/field mic.


1

Yeah, me too I'm using Marantz PMD-661 with RODE NTG-2 shotgun microphone.Fantastic pairing, but I recommend it. Check my sound demos


1

I am looking at getting the Zoom H1 recorder, but a decent Shotgun Mic, and then build a Boom Pole and a Shock Mount. I searched youtube.com and came across many videos on how to build them. I have a nady shotgun mic, it doesnt pic up the best of quality, but with some editing I can clean it up pretty well.


1

I use a Audio Technica AT875R short shotgun mic. It is supposed to be powered with 48V Phantom power, but actually you can power it from the couple of volts plug-in power from the Sony M10 , believe it or not. Obviously, there is a drop-off in performance but it works quite well. The upside is the AT875 produces a large output signal so it doesn't require ...


1

Supercardioids are most commonly used for interior dialog recording, due to their excellent side rejection, and pretty decent rear rejection characteristics. Cardioids and hypercardioids, with their broader patterns, are not nearly as common, though they can be used when framing is tight and you are close to the talent, or if the room is relatively anechoic ...


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