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9

Record one long shot. Split it from the half. Put one half to the right channel and the other to left channel. Export a stereo file. This way you will get a very wide stereo image that is hard to get from a stereo field recording and your sounds in the front will be clearly distinct from ambience. Do not just transform to stereo. If you do that, you will ...


4

Ok, so for backpacking and biking, here are the component parts: recorder: SD 702 - quality sound, durable build, simple operation. Its the heavier and bulkier of the viable options, but it won't ever fail you. SD mixpre + Sony PCM M10 - still quality sound, lighter and more compact, but also a little fiddlier since you're dealing with two devices that ...


4

Record 2 mono claps/pulses/shots, however you're generating it. Move the mic from one side of the room to the other for each, keeping each at the same distance from the source. Match up the initial claps later, save as stereo. It won't be perfect, but no-one except you will ever know ;-)


3

It's not impossible to record ambiences that are near-silent, if you choose to go that route. You'll have to go out of your way to find them, probably very late at night or very early on a Sunday morning when the urban noise is at its lowest, but it can be achieved. Even with a pristine recording of a silent background, you're going to have to manufacture ...


3

Yes, Paula Fairfield is really a great talent. She brings that stuff to life so well. They do a great justice to the books for the readers, while still keeping it interesting and balanced.


3

I would suggest naming them after the object that is the sound source for the recording. In the metadata you can then get descriptive and just add anything that would help you find them later into the keywords but as the main name I'd stick with source and other relevant details (e.g. induction_harddrive_writing_... or shorter ind_hd_writing ...).


3

First off, I think it's cool they didn't just ask you to make it sound like Transformers! But I think it's a difficult task because the sound in the clip is very stylised and not actually in very tight sync to the action. It feels like you hear more swooping/flying around and atmos than actual synchronised movement sounds, so perhaps part of the challenge ...


2

Hey, a fellow Australian sound editor. First up Rabbit Ears Audio have a bunch of tank libraries. You can buy them separately or in a bundle here: http://rabbitearsaudio.com/rea005-military-vehicles/ Are you in Victoria per chance? I was actually out at a track that has WW2 era Centurion tank. Though the Rabbit Ears library doesn't any recording of the ...


2

The majority of that video sounds like granular synthesis. You can find components that do this in Ableton Live, Reaktor, or Max/MSP. I think MOTU ship an awesome granular in MachFive. Or you can google Imperial Grains or a PC equivalent. Re the little sounds sprinkled all over the video, many are microsampled bits such as metal and glass particles (or you ...


2

I haven't had an opportunity to watch it yet, however I do personally know some of the sound crew and have heard it's a very great-sounding show - and I imagine that from seeing hat's it's aesthetic is like, it is a highly-demanding show as far as sound. The earlier seasons were helmed by Peter Brown over at Soundelux, which they recently garnered a Golden ...


2

Found this and it's exactly what I was looking for! http://boomlibrary.com/boomlibrary/products/sci-fi Hopefully this helps someone! :)


2

I had the same problem a few years ago, so I made Excel table for it manually from Juicer searcher, you can download it here - hope it'll help: http://liquidblasted.net/other/juicy_sound_tracklist_4.zip UPD: Here is a link to all tracklists for Digital Juice I, II, III and IV volumes: http://liquidblasted.net/other/digital_juice_tracklists.zip


2

If Boom didnt give you what you needed, you could always record the sounds yourself if you have the ability to. Ive had some issues with designing car shots myself in the past and I have just done some creative design work and it has worked for me. I have had to rely on creatively using the libraries I have to design what was needed, this involving "Everyday ...


2

I've just watched the longplay of Super Mario 3D Land, and have some advice for you. I work with casual games for about a year, and those sounds is from my type of work. The basic rule for this SFX's is "imagine, that everything is tiny". It's like living in a toy world. The sounds is more rounded and all envelopes is as glide as possible. In foley try to ...


2

If you have Reaktor, then try S-Layer: http://twistedtools.com/shop/reaktor/s-layer/


2

What André said. Then try describing what you HEAR. Buzz, hiss, whirr, growl, whine. You're basically putting keywords into the filename - good practice in my opinion. If I was a sound editor/designer looking for buzzy, whiny electronic sounds, I would search my database for some of those adjectives first, unless i knew I had just the right recording of a ...


2

This is a really general answer and you may get better ideas by chatting with someone in person but: I think this is a really classical example of balancing time, effort and economics (how much are you asking for, how much are the others asking for). It's really just something that you need to balance, so that it feels good for you and others that are ...


2

This is kind of a broad question. Sounds like this in commercials and movie trailers came from the mainstream success of EDM like Skrillex etc. I hear a lot of the bread and butter tools of aggressive synthsizers - modulating the cutoff of resonant filters, etc. I hear some "lo-fi" stuff, most obvious in the beginning, that sounds like it had a reduced ...


2

A combination of heavily modulated synthesisers. Just sample them and play with the values while you record stuff. Then cut out the coolest parts and use them in a sampler. automate the pitch to get crazy change of modulation speeds and tonal changes and use external fx like chorus reverb and distortion and automate their values so they fit the rhythm of the ...


2

Another tip if your packing for ultra light situations: buy a nagra sd and a pair of dpa 4060's or 4063's. And get wired coathanger as a stereo bar. You can look at a binaural setup here (not my site BTW). http://www.manvanhetgeluid.nl/en/binaural-sound/ But I agree with Rene that the 702 is perhaps a better allrounder that lasts a long time. You can pick ...


2

As such, I would never mix effects on the sides but nothing in center, and I normally place most effects, and here I'm talking about straight in-frame effects, pretty much centered, with only reverbations in the sides and rear. Unless it's panned. Then it's still mono plus acoustics, but panned. On certain rather big things though, like close ups to trains, ...


2

Based on their About page: Just copy the file(s) into that folder then I’ll check your recording and move it to the appropriate theme folder (e.g. ‘Dog Barks’) then I’ll invite you to join that folder. When you accept, the entire ‘Dog Barks’ folder will sync to your Google Drive – the more themes you contribute to, the bigger collection of ...


2

The simplest way is to find some free gunshot sound effects online. If you need to create your own it can be done by layering 2-3 basic sounds. Start with a cookie sheet being hit against something (try to get a few different sounds from the hits). The cookie sheet will give you the metallic sound on top and should be the root sound. The next part of the ...


2

The average frequency range (the linear portion of the typical frequency response curve for phone speakers) is about 500-5000 Hz (source 1, source 2), and one speaker manufacturer produced this frequency response chart (source) which does show a shifted range towards the higher end (it is more like 1-10kHz: This means that you should definitely avoid too ...


2

I think it would be better to find other sound effects... Or, better yet, make them yourself. Cleaning those sounds will probably be a lot of work for a non ideal result. Additionally those sounds may be protected by author´s rights and you could have legal problems using them. Enjoy the process of your sound effects creation!


2

This depends a lot what you are trying to archieve with sound (is it supposed to imply power, violence, is it stealthy, do you want to emphasize the weapon used etc), but here are some elements I've used Attack/impact: -Short clip of metal scratching to metal sound. -Knife stabbed to soil -Crowbar hitting soil -Slush stomp impact -Different fruit/...


2

I've always used things like jet engines and thunder from libraries and a mish mash of other odds and sods. Another trick I tried was to compress a sound until it distorts the converter, (you need to turn your speakers off for this) then send it to another channel and record it at a lower level. If you've ever played Titanfall you'll know the sound I mean. ...


2

There's no set way of making these sounds, the first one sounds like lighting/electricity mixed with some sort of computer generated sound from a synth. Second one is something being pitched down again, maybe a synth. Third one, sounds like an explosion and again, mixed with a digital sound. Of course, this is just my opinion and I could be completely ...


2

Whenever I want to recreate a sound synthetically, I start by analyzing the envelopes, source, filter and modulations and effects. The source will certainly be white noise since there isn't any tonal content. The main filter is a low pass but to add realism, I would also use some band pass filters and/or eq peaks. I would use one eq peak or BPF (in a ...


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