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9

Record one long shot. Split it from the half. Put one half to the right channel and the other to left channel. Export a stereo file. This way you will get a very wide stereo image that is hard to get from a stereo field recording and your sounds in the front will be clearly distinct from ambience. Do not just transform to stereo. If you do that, you will ...


8

I like to take some interesting ambiences and pass them through a short doppler effect. You can generate a lot of varied material rather quickly and have precise control over the length. It works great with natural elements such as wind but I've had some surprisingly good results with machinery, there is quite a large opportunity for experimentation with ...


7

Soundminer has a built in function called "freelance mode" that let's you install the software and databases on the same portable drive as your library. So you can just bring the one drive, plug it in and you are ready to go. Go to the help window in Soundminer, pull up the manual and it is all explained in there. Good Luck.


6

No. This would come under the heading of selling "derivatives," which most licenses specify that you may not do. If you want to sell sound effects, they have to be ones that you own the distribution rights to...from source to finish. This doesn't preclude you from hiring someone to record or generate some source material for you, but it would have to be in ...


5

Yep, pretty much use any decent synth you can find for sounds in those sections. Some simple ideas to try for musical feedback buttons: Load your synth. Choose a preset. Find the main amp envelope and adjust so ADSR all on zero. Raise decay till you have a quick bleep. Adjust the ADSR of both AMP and FILTER envelope of synth. Always keeping the ...


5

Typically, I'll drop a marker and keep moving forward. On most projects that I'm on I don't have the luxury of spending hours on a specific sequence, let alone a particular effect. If it's not coming to me fluidly at that moment, I keep making progress on the rest of the project. Eventually something, a clip down the timeline, a phone call, a daydream, ...


4

This boutique library from John Leonard called "sounds of flight" might do the trick. The price is certainly right...


4

three suggestions: two possible ideas, and one to help you find your own. I immediately start thinking of rustling sounds and cord whips. Something like Tim Prebble's Swishes library could be very useful. Ryan (Utopia) has given you some useful suggestions for generating rustling sounds, but I wouldn't be afraid to expand it out of the realm of fabric. ...


4

Unless you're cutting an instructional film for ornithologists don't worry about the species. This is your scene. What kind of birds do you want to hear? What sounds would enhance the feeling the movie cries out for? This is where the sound editor earns his money. Create a sound environment that dramatically does it for you and the audience will be ...


4

That's not really how editing and mixing works. Everything that goes into an audio track needs to support the narrative, the characterization of the central figures, the mood in that scene, and the persepctive the director wants in focus. There is no prescriptions that says, "This sound plays at this level." It's a process of decision making that affects the ...


4

The human voice is one of the most versatile synthesizers going and I've recorded many whooshes that can be used as base sounds and then layered with other sound textures.


4

Some links: http://www.jetstreaming.org/2011/09/30/selling-sound-effects-how-to/ How to make money with sound design. This is your competition: http://www.sounddogs.com/ http://www.soundrangers.com/ http://www.airbornesound.com/ http://designingsound.org/sfx-independence/ http://www.sound-ideas.com/ http://www.pond5.com/sound-effects/1/*.html http://www....


4

Ok, so for backpacking and biking, here are the component parts: recorder: SD 702 - quality sound, durable build, simple operation. Its the heavier and bulkier of the viable options, but it won't ever fail you. SD mixpre + Sony PCM M10 - still quality sound, lighter and more compact, but also a little fiddlier since you're dealing with two devices that ...


4

Record 2 mono claps/pulses/shots, however you're generating it. Move the mic from one side of the room to the other for each, keeping each at the same distance from the source. Match up the initial claps later, save as stereo. It won't be perfect, but no-one except you will ever know ;-)


3

Steel wool? I would experiment with getting two strips of astroturf and rubbing them lightly together. There are also sponges you can get from bath&body type stores which are hard-fibered sponges - like those big sponge balls - they might create an interesting layer. Horse hair brush? Like the ones used to shine shoes. Raid a salon and steal all of ...


3

When we were designing the soundtrack for Tangled (the Disney movie), one of the big challenges was how to create the sound of Rapunzel's hair. We recorded a TON of material, mostly plant-based but also using different types of cloth. Some of the results were less than astounding but there were some great discoveries along the way, and although they weren't ...


3

Hi. What kind of things are you looking for? While I don't live in Russia I am in Estonia, next door, and Estonia has lot's of wide open spaces with no traffic, airplane or human sounds. If there is something specific you want maybe I can get it for you!


3

Russia is pretty huge, what part of Russia are you after? I'm in finland that is also just next door but a bit further north, so if there is something specific I could help or might even have it already. Alternatively check out this guy http://www.kaamossound.com/ he lives further north than me and has an extensive collection of local recordings.


3

As far as I understand it the copyright applies more or less only for electronically, and preferably (but not exclusively) musical, designed sound. Like the ringtones from polyphonic/PCM-cellphones to name one thing. When it comes to Zippo's, Cadillac doors, Harley-motors, the buttons on a Nintendo NES, et cetera, it is, still as far as I know, like taking a ...


3

Anyone familiar with this technique??? http://designingsound.org/2010/02/charles-deenen-special-100-whooshes-in-2-minutes/


3

I've always believed that if you are going to process a borrowed source to the extent of being unrecognizable, why not just create it originally? The purpose of borrowing, sampling a source would be to utilize a characteristic of the source. If it's truly processed past that point then why did you use it? If you can only get the result desired by using the ...


3

this is a pretty good starting point for you: http://www.jetstreaming.org/2012/09/05/an-introduction-to-sound-effects-mastering/ Once you have read that article explore the rest of the jetstreaming blog, as a lot of it will be useful info for what you are tackling.


3

This might provide some ideas.


3

Wheel barrows usually have rubber tires on them. Throw some in soft weight that won't bounce (canvas sand bags can be pretty good), rig up your mic to the wheel barrow so you don't have to have someone chasing it, and push that sucker around. The two wheel variants might be more stable and give you better control with less handling noise.


3

Really nice work! I recorded some printing presses last year, and found the big industrial ones to be incredibly challenging to get just right. I was really running and gunning in a massive industrial complex though. Sounds like you had the opportunity to sit and do a study on one machine, which is very cool IMO. What was your recording setup?


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