Hot answers tagged

6

At first I was reluctant to answer this question, as I believe in order to do this properly, will cost more than the value of said sub-woofer. However as nobody else has commented, I will give you an answer on how you can do this. There are two problems we need to overcome: The mixer has no further outputs to connect the subwoofer. The subwoofer has ...


6

The main disadvantage is generally cost and modularity, the advantage is simplicity. With an amp and passive speaker system, you can invest separately in a good amp and good speakers. You can upgrade one without the other and you have more flexibility in how you can upgrade. Also, generally, higher quality combined speakers will be more expensive than ...


5

A sound card includes a DAC by necessity, but is a more complex device in theory. A sound card is able to synthesize sounds rather than simply play back samples and may have hardware that is capable of modifying samples on the fly (such as applying effects). A DAC on the other hand serves only the purpose of taking a digital signal and converting it to an ...


5

I am somewhat reluctant to answer the question, due to the fact that I cannot find any further info (such as manuals) for that Leem LMM-6S mixer. I did found a Leem HM-624 which looks at least somewhat similar, but that didn't allow me to download the manual either. Without further information, wiring diagrams, and details on the actual PA system, the only ...


3

You are correct in assuming that the speakers can only withstand the peak power for very short periods of time. The VP2520 is a 4 Ω speaker. Looking at the technical specs of the amp, it seems the continous power per channel for a 4 Ω load is only 500 W (rms). The peak power is 750 W per channel. In other words, the VP2520 appears to be a perfect match for ...


2

1 & 2) You seem to understand the reason your compressor is a part of your signal chain. It sounds as though your compressor is set up to adjust the level it receives from your console to about -3dB. If it is working for you then it is in a good spot IMO. However, I don't think your Topaz console has a master insert. An insert literally places your ...


2

I helped answer your last question as well, and nothing is wrong with your setup. I understand your confusion, but take from this that +27dBu definitely does not mean you are outputting +27dB. The dBu numbers correspond to the nominal operating level of your equipment, and in the pro audio world -10dBu devices require more gain to reach the same nominal ...


2

It's not ideal, but if you don't use the headphone output on the mixer, just run a stereo 1/4" to rca y-splitter cable to the rca inputs of the subwoofer. Otherwise, I'd have to agree that it would be more trouble/expensive than it is worth.


2

A sound card also includes Audio inputs converted to digital by ADCs. Here's a traditional block diagram of the sound card and circled in red are the DACs and the ADCs: - Your computer is basically the PCI bus which the sound card plugs into. There's a fair bit more in a soundcard than just the DAC part and of course the ADC allows you to record analogue ...


1

Well what you want to do is a bit tricky. Lets take it from the top and clear some basics. If you use a normal microphone driving it straight to the amplifier wont be a good option. Microphone 's output impedance is 600ohm opposed to the 10kohm (hi-z) that the guitar amp is waiting for at the input. So to cover the microphone part you would need ...


1

So my workaround looks as follows: connect SQ-1 to DAW via USB sync out Volca cable to sync in SQ-1 set bpm in Volca with the same value as in DAW hit record in DAW hit start in SQ-1 Probably not ideal solution but works.


1

Yes, you can use the FX send to send the 3rd channel to the recorder as you said. Just keep in mind that it's a mono bus on the out. But the recorder seems to only have 2 inputs and you will have to mix (any) two mics on one channel which counters the whole point of using the FX bus to get an extra out. You either need a recording device (or audio ...


1

Could you plug your computer into a channel on your mixer board? It's hard to tell without knowing what specific mixer you have, but you should be able to find a suitable cable for $5-20. On your computer, there are plenty of ways to play the sounds. Depending on your needs, you could play the sounds out of a music player, or a more customizable soundboard ...


1

The "USB TO DEVICE" connector is not useful for real-time MIDI. Both keyboards have a "USB TO HOST" connector, which can be connected only to a PC. So if you want to link them, you have to do this with software on the PC. (This typically requires a "virtual MIDI" driver.)


1

Here's some basic checks you can do at each stage. This applies more generally to pretty much any signal chain too. I'm sure if you go through and check everything, you will find a place where your preamp volume is too low, you have a bad cable, or you're not getting power to the mic, or something else simple along those lines. Your signal chain should be ...


1

Annie Lennox of the Eurhythmics quite famously recorded her vocals in the control room rather than the studio. This was done by using two techniques together. A dynamic mic with a high rejection to the rear - Shure SM58, really a 'live' mic rather than studio vocal mic. She performed whilst literally touching the pop-shield with her lips as she sang, so ...


1

a) Shotgun microphones perform best when cancelling off-axis planar wavefronts. In short, not indoors. They work best outdoors. b) You are obviously feeding-back your microphone signal into your monitors. You should be able to turn this feature off in the sound driver, or in the application you are using. c) You might want to try a lavalier mic. With ...


1

As you'll know, an electric guitar typically requires amplification to be heard, hence usually plugging it into an amp! On top of this you usually throw a bunch of standard distortion and reverb effects, and EQ, that your amp will offer. The DI box performs this amplification when you are using a PA system, or recording straight into a computer, etc etc. ...


1

One solution could be using a mixing console converting your signal to mono then routing back the signal to your amp. In the same category, why don't you convert to mono your output source. This kind of process is usually really simple with DAWs and depends on your OS but you should find options or programs that help you doing this kind of things Another ...


1

I have found out the problem, I will share this with anyone that may run into this in the future. It was a simple problem yet I could not notice it at first. The table I had my turntable on was vibrating from the speakers, thus causing the stylus to shake all over the record.


1

I have a "recording" folder on my HomeComputer and a "recording" folder on my StudioComputer, and I wanted these working folders to stay in sync, similar to dropbox or google drive. The folders contain my Logic 9 projects, sample libraries, and small video projects. The solution I found is synchronization software called GoodSync, and it's working pretty ...


1

You should be fine plugging your power bar into the furman (i do the same thing) as long as you don't pull too much current. The pl-8c has a 15amp 'breaker' on it, so don't exceed that. I don't think using your power bar would nullify the benefits of the furman 'cleans' in the incoming ac current then delivers it to it's outputs, which your power bar plugs ...


1

You don't mention how you record; are you splitting the masters from the QX1832USB, recording via the USB interface, or anything else? A different solution to what owl describes could simply be to mic the room. Although you don't get anything near "studio" quality of the resulting recordings, this can sound surprisingly well, and room mics will capture ...


1

For reference, such a mic is typically called a condenser mic rather than a capacitor mic. Condensor is a former term for capacitors, but condenser continues to be used to describe microphones that work on the principal. That's a type of mic that uses changes in an electrical field between two wires to detect sound and it is more sensitive in general than ...


1

1) This isn't invalid, but it is a little weird. An insert goes before the fader where as the output goes after. Using the insert would give the master fader total control over the output level where as the positioning on the outside of the board means that a) it will protect the output gear from accidentally going too loud and b) it will make the behavior ...


1

From the list of speakers you have there, they could all be appropriate for the size of gigs you describe. You would be much better off with unpowered speakers though - if you use powered speakers you need to be able to plug them all in to the mains, and at many venues this can be a problem. In general, a couple of subs (bigger can be better if your music ...


1

A powered speaker will generally cost more and be heavier, since they integrate the amp. If you are going with 4 speakers, and want flexibility in adding more in the future, it may be worth it to go passive. Behringer makes some nice 4 channel amps that are lightweight, look for the iNuke series. I have 2 of the 10" Behringer active speakers and they are ...


1

The importance of gain is often overlooked. Many recording interfaces have some sort of clip meter Indicator (often in the mid price a single red light). Manufacturers often recommend setting gain until the light only occasionally lights up to get a desirable input level. However it is not just the highest loudness without clipping of the input signal which ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible