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6

They will be able to reduce echo in their complete state, but don't expect them to help too much, as there are some caveats: Just piling them up in a corner won't be very effective - they will absorb many frequencies better than a solid wall, but you still have flat reflective surfaces, and they will each have a resonant frequency. As long as the resonant ...


5

It's perhaps worth going into a bit more detail about the setup. From what you've said I presume it was a PA system and people speaking, right? In makeshift situations like these I think the important things are: Use a cardoid/hypercardoid mic. If it's a lectern situation miniature shotguns like the akg c474 are good for this sort of thing Get your speaker ...


4

Hey Geronimo, why don't you experiment with re-amping the dialogue track through a slightly open door. Even if the result isn't usable, you'll at least have a very solid reference that you can aim for with regards to verb and eq. speaker in room A -> half open door -> mono mic in room B from camera perspective alternatively you could shoot an impulse ...


4

Sometimes I ask that the Director to wait a few seconds after frame is called by the cam operator. If there's not enough time there. I ask for 15 seconds to 30 seconds of quiet before cut is called on the 'final' take of a scene. The truth is room tone is mostly used from the takes themselves.. not from the separate room tone recording. The only time you ...


3

I've had decent luck experimenting with making a "distant" sound with just processing: A bit of lowpass filter (not too aggressive, but obvious enough) to dull it, and leave other sounds in the mix more prominent. Reverb with a semi-long initial decay and dense reflections. The idea is to suggest that there was plenty of space between the sound and the ...


3

You should check out this site. He is very helpful but you must read his requirements for activity on his forum very carefully. http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php. Also this http://www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html Bass trapping is the main place to start. I wont explain bass trapping here as you could spend months studying it but I can tell you ...


2

It is partly due to the voice being mixed differently, but also comes from how the voice is recorded - controlled conditions in the studio, using a large diaphragm condenser with the actor close-in. Recording like this gives more bass and nice crisp highs in the tone of the voice. If you compare that to the way dialog on set is recorded - with a boom, from a ...


2

I need room tone by microphone angle for dialog editing. I usually make fill with pauses between breaths, but if I can even get 10 seconds per angle, then I'm pretty happy. A general room tone is really helpful when I'm backfilling MOS shots, then I don't have to try to make a fill from other takes, or the take prior. A trick that I've been using on sets ...


1

You have experienced a high quality system in a controlled environment. You may not be able to duplicate it exactly in your room but you can vastly improve your room experience and over time, as your budget allows, you can improve it. Since you say your music consumption comes in the form of digital files on your Iphone you need to start educating ...


1

Great answers so far. I suppose if you have the chance to Worldize it that might be worth a go too!


1

Join thesoundcollectorsclub and contribute some recordings to the echospace theme. there are some good museum recordings in there.


1

Tim Prebble once undertook a massive "globalsourced" library dealing exclusively with room tones but don't believe it ever came to fruition. Perhaps he would be a resource? Otherwise I concur with @Stavrosound; you'll more than likely need to create your own to match what you're seeing on the screen.


1

You may have some luck with the Rabbit Ears Audio REA0013 set. There's a few good ones in there which you can layer, although I feel some are riddled with preamp hiss. I believe Soundeffects.ch has a roomtone set, although I'm not familiar with it. Likely to achieve the sound you want, it will involve layering different roomtone textures and EQing them to ...


1

I was just at a shoot where after the last take the director himself asked everyone to stay in place for 30 seconds for room tone - brilliant


1

Flipstar gave a good explanation—I'll add that I've worked with a couple of directors who actually like to have a long silence on set right before the first take of a scene. It's a moment for everyone to relax and think about what they are about to do for the shot. Plus, no one is trying to "pack up silently" while you linger and curse them for every floor ...


1

It's very important to establish a routine with the 1st AD (if there is one) as well, as he or she is most often the one who handles the scheduling of the day and calls the roll. On the first production day, make sure you let the AD know what you need (room tone as well as wild sound) so that recording room tone is an expected and integral part of the day. ...


1

Well usually what is expected from the director and the other members of the crew is roughly 5-10 sec of silence before the Director says ACTION and 5-10 sec silence after the Director says cut. That's what I request my director to do. Some of them follow, some of them just disregard it and think that everything can be FIXED in post. If you are freelancing ...


1

Look up this topic on jwsoundgroup.net, there are several quite long discussions about it by top professionals in the business.


1

if the scene has lots of cuts i'd be inclined to keep the background stuff consistent and only change the dialogue reverb for the perspective shifts.


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