3

You need to ABSORB sound partly to reduce, and partly to keep it from bouncing around (which is why it sounds like a bathroom). So THICKER things like heavy curtains or moving blankets (or quilts) or even old mattresses propped up against the wall have been effective. If you MUST use egg cartons (which you already know are not very effective), then at least ...


2

First things first, use your crossover. You should connect your main outputs to it and feed your main loudspeakers and your subwoofers power amps from it. Connecting and learning how to configure your crossover should be easy enough and straightforward, after you do some reading of the manual. This will give you the advantage of using less faders to control ...


1

A diffuser is used to scatter sound waves unevenly so the surface needs to be also very uneven. So you need a mildly reflective material such as wood or cork cut out so that it has edges and crevices of different sizes, angles and shapes. This will cause the round or flat (depends if we're talking near of far field and consequently the size and shape of the ...


1

I covered my dorm room with egg cartons when I was in school. We used contact cement or a tough rubber cement (I think it was called "Goo") to stick them to the walls and ceiling. I agree with the idea of doubling the layers. you should also stagger the crates to cover the joints in the lower layer. Besides all the other disadvantages mentioned above, I will ...


1

Egg cartons won't do much of anything. There's a lot of research on this on sound engineering forums. Get yourself some acoustic panels instead.


1

Have you heard of Doscha Wool? http://www.archello.com/en/product/wool-insulation Works very well and is environmentally friendly as well! And not extremely expensive. Arnoud


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