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5

One little technique you can try which is very quick and can yield surprisingly good results is converting random files into audio data. You can achieve this by downloading 'Soundhack'. It's an old, free bit of software that allows you to attach a wav. header to any file; be that a text file, movie, image etc. It mainly produces white noise but can ...


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You mentioned that you've been using sine waves so this may cover some already-tread ground, but the basic process can apply to lots of different source material. What you'll need is a base sound of some kind (ie. a tone generator, a synth tone, etc) running through a few basic plugins (ie. an amplitude modulator, a flanger, a chorus, etc) and outputting to ...


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@Ross- There's a lot of ways to approach this, but for me it depends on the 'era' of computer you're going for and what's unique, cool or important about this particular computer? Then research the technology that may have been available in the era. Now you've got it narrowed down a bit....and you can start looking at ways to build the sound into the ...


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One of things I am learning now is the Doepfer A100 analog modular synthesizer. Mostly used for making electronic music, I believe it has a lotta scope for creating various sci-fi sounds. Ofcourse, it is not possible for everyone to own one, or find one very easily to work on, but you can literally create the synthesizer using the Nord Modular G2. Its a free ...


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I don't like suggesting proprietary products, but.. TBH, I think NI Reaktor and it's dozens and dozens of pre-built ensembles make all kinds of synthetic noises (especially short bleeps and UI-like sounds) fairly trivial, because many of them can be used without much thought/understanding of what's really happening. They're built for playing and many of ...


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