5

I am an engineering student my self and I use Audacity to generate Sine, Sawtooth, Square waves. It's easy as pie. Download Audacity from here. Open Audacity and click on Generate from the Toolbar on top. Select the waveform you need, the frequency, the amplitude and duration you want it. Play the track.


4

You may want to check out SPEAR. From the website: SPEAR is an application for audio analysis, editing and synthesis. The analysis procedure (which is based on the traditional McAulay-Quatieri technique) attempts to represent a sound with many individual sinusoidal tracks (partials), each corresponding to a single sinusoidal wave with time varying frequency ...


4

Any DAW (digital audio workstation) or even most video editing software will display a waveform for the audio in a particular file. You can not, however, make a "sine wave of whatever audio file" because the file doesn't contain a sine wave. A sine wave is a very particular type of fixed frequency oscillation. You would set a signal generator to a ...


3

Instead of simply listing practical details about how you're making your sounds (eg. types of mics, foley techniques and so forth), you might consider making more theory-based speculations about why certain sounds, or qualities of sound, are appropriate to convey the particular messages that you're trying to convey; how they create meaning for the listener ...


2

Although the focus is on sound design for theatre, Ross Brown's Sound: A Reader in Theatre Practice is a brilliant resource with a wide-ranging bibliography. 'Reader'-type books are great for initial research for this very reason: someone else has gathered all the essential reading into one book! As @Arran says, theory-based texts about why we use sound are ...


2

From the top of my head, the book "Sound Design" by David Sonnenschein is a very good start! I'm on my second read-through on it myself right now :-)


2

You can use Sony Sound Forge, there's a waveform generator inside of it. Best for you could be Audacity which is free see the doc. You could also use a synth in a DAW to generate sines even squares etc...


1

If my memory is good, Sony - Sound Forge have an Auto Region tool. This could do the trick.


1

Since this is in soundDesign I will assume you are doing research on sound design in films. One of my favorite films for sound design in general (and fits in a bit before your civil war era) is Master and Commander, you really need a nice 7.1 setup to get the full effect but worth a listen. The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen has man to beast as well ...


1

Going for the obvious... Raging Bull - one of the greatest movies of all time, which happens to be about a boxer. Fantastic use of sound throughout the film. no recommendations but Glory looks exactly what you're after. TV series like War and Peace (2007) or Napoleon (2002) might have good research material (haven't seen them) American Werewolf in London ...


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